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Full text of "The Maryland Magazine"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/marymaga35univ 



Volume XXXV Number One • January-February 1963 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 




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ALWAYS THERE . . . WITH YOUR HELP 



the 




magazine 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXV Number 1 



[Maryland — 




The Cover: Always eager to publish a cover illustration which reflects 
the spirit of the University, the Editors commissioned artist Howard 
Behrens, A&S '61 to prepare this view of the College Park campus. Faced 
with the prospeet of trying to show a 300-aere campus and its 83 principal 
buildings, Behrens selected general outstanding architecture features, and, 
using a telephoto lens effect with contrasting blocks of white and black. 
achieved a striking portrait. To those sharing our enthusiasm for the art 
of Howard Behrens we will be pleased to send an 8x10 glossy photograph 
of the cover illustration without commercial message and without cost. 
As this issue goes to press the artist begins work on his second commission 
— an imaginative view of the Baltimore campus. 



2 



The Exuberant University Theater 



10 



The Alumni Diary 



11 



Alumni and Campus Notes 



16 



Secondary Education in the Sixties 



22 



Inside Maryland Sports 



23 



Through the Years 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 

HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 

LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

RICHARD W. CASE 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 

WILLIAM C. WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. MCCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
HARRY E. HASSLINGER '33, President 
DR. EDWARD STONE, JR., '25, Vice-President 
MRS ERNA RIEDEL CHAPMAN, '34, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. BARBARA HARRIGAN, Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



ADVERTISING DIRECTORS 
MRS. H. B. GILLESPIE 

411 Range Road 

Baltimore 4, Md. 

828-9050 



RICHARD F. ROSS 
6136 Parkway Drive 
Baltimore 12. Md 
435-6767 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park, Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. -$3.00 per year-Fifty cents the copy-Member of American Alumni Council. 



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ayers first test: the audition. 



PHOTOGRAPHS BY EMORY KRISTOF 



The 

Exuberant 

University 

Theater 



SHAKESPEARE, 

WILDER, 

BURROWS . . . 

Maryland students play 

each with vitality and effect. 

As these photographs will 

illustrate, the necessity to 

communicate the excitement , 

drama and meaning of the 

living theater becomes a 

matter of serious concern — 

even when playing such an 

tin- serious show as 

Guys and Dolls. 



H 




«*fc 



After a wait in the wing, Charles Ford and 
Dawn Chubb march into the play. 



Student seamstresses rush completion of costumes. 




Run through it again. 
Roy Hendricks and Bill Higgins rehearse a duet. 




The Director (Rudy Pugliese) is worried. 
Rehearsal stops. 



The 
Catalyst of Rehearsal 

The work and worry of fitting the people 
to their parts, and the parts to the play. 



Exhaustion. 




)PENING 
NIGHT 

he house is sold out. 
The cast is ready. 
Curtain up. 







* • ■'; M 



I I M2*K 




Carolyn Snyder anticipates 
her first stage appearance. 




Hendricks and Higgins in costume, on stage; the musical 
unfolds without hesitation. 




Beginning its twentieth season, 

University Theater plays to a University Community 

audience of 10,000 each year. 

Its four annual shows attract the participation 

of 150 students from all of the schools and colleges. 




At the finale, thunderous applause 
— sole reward for their creative effort. 



The General Alumni Council 

school and college 
representatives: 

AGR I I 1 i lint 

Mylo Downey, '27 
Abram Z. Gottwals, '38 
H. M. Carroll, '20 

ARTS k SCIBMCKS 

Joe Mathias, '35 
Jess KrajcH ic, '32 

Richard Bourne, '57 

'.ESS * PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas E. Bourne, Jr. 
Chester W. Tawney, '31 

Jacob B. Sclar, '34 

DENTISTRY 

Dr. Charles E. Broadrup, '32 
Dr. Edward D. Stone, Jr., '25 
Dr. George B. Clendenin, '29 

EDUCATION 

Edward S. Beach, Jr., '49 
Harry E. Hasslinger, '33 
Miss Dorothy Ordwein, '35 

ENGI N EERI NC 

Emmett T. Loane, '29 
Tracy Coleman, '35 
James A. Stapp, Jr., '47 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Ruth Lee Thompson Clarke, '42 
Mrs. Mary Ward Davis, '55 
Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '43 



Hon. W. Albert Menchine, '29 
Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 
Hon. Joseph L. Carter, '25 

M EDICINE 

Dr. Arthur G. Siwinski, '31 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 
Dr. Frank K. Morris 

NURSING 

Mrs. E. Elizabeth Roth Hipp, '29 

Miss Doris Stevens, '51 

Mrs. Kathryn P. Donnelly, '48 

PHARMACY 



Hyman Davidov '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen '25 
Dr. Frank J. Slama '24 



EXOFFICIO MEMBERS: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, A&S '38 

Director & Executive Secretary 
Victor Holm, A&S '57 

Field Secretary 
I'ast Presidents 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, DDS '19 
C. V. Koons, Engr. '29 
Talbot T. Speer, Agr. '17 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, MD '12 
Col. O. H. Saunders, Engr. '10 
J. Homer Remsberg, Agr. '18 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, LL.B. '33 
Joseph H. Deckman, Engr. '31 
Frank Block, Phar. '24 
Harry A. Boswcll, Jr., BPA '42 
Mrs. Elizabeth Rohr Singleton, 

Nuts. '47; Edu. '51 
Dr. Reginald V. Truitt, A&S '14 

ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENTATIVES : 
Baltimore — John L. Lampe, A&S, '50 
"M" Club— George W. Knepley, Edu., '39 
Montgomery County — Donald M. Boyd 
Pittsburgh— A. B. "Budd" Fisher, Eng '26 
Prince Georges County — 

Dr. John W. C ronin, DDS '36 
Richmond — Paul Mtillinix, Agr. '36 
lenapin — James w. Stevens, Agr. '19 
U. S. Department of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, Agr. '26 
Washington County — 

Charles B. Huyctt, A&S '53 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



10 



THE YOUNGSTER IN A SMALL COUNTRY HOME WAS FASCINATED BY A FRAMED 
placard which hung on the living room wall. It said, "Make new friends, 
but keep the old. These are silver, those are gold." Some years later, this same 
young man was given a "two-month" assignment at the University of Mary- 
land. He was to set alumni records and addresses in order so a strong Alumni 
Association might be established. This was January, 1947. Many new friends 
have since been made, and many of the old have remained. 

An amazing change has taken place. We could go back to earlier student 
days, or even to a generation which preceded us at Maryland. It is more 
satisfying, however, to start at the point where we became an active part of 
the Alumni Association. The initial Alumni mailing list contained less than 
5,000 addresses. This now exceeds 40,000. Approximately 85% of our living 
Alumni have graduated since the close of World War II. The total valuation 
of our University physical plant was less than ten million in the mid-forties. 
In 1963 around eleven million will be spent for new construction alone. The 
enrollment figure, which then totalled a few thousand, now exceeds forty 
thousand. 

One Alumnus focused attention on the past sixteen years, when he said 
"Why not call on some of the younger Alumni? I am getting a little old and 
somewhat tired." He added, "Your requests continually point to the fact that 
I may still have an obligation to the University for what it gave me. How long 
do I work before this obligation is met?" 

Admittedly, many of the "older workers in the vineyard" have reason to 
be tired. Certainly, there are others who deserve to feel they have fulfilled 
their obligation to the University of Maryland. Why not put a "paid-in-full" 
stamp on the "old alumni work horse" and let him quietly relax? The answer 
lies in the present and in the future. Our Alumni President is a prime example. 
He has given more than 16 voluntary and unselfish years to the University 
and the Alumni Association. His daughter happens to be one of the 17,500 
students on the College Park Campus. Undoubtedly, she would have been 
here whether or not he was an active Alumnus. His long years of service make 
him one of the "old friends of gold." He has helped the Alumni Association 
grow from 286 dues-paying members in 1946 to more than 5,000 at the 
present time. 

Why does an Alumnus stay active? Why does he feel a continuing obliga- 
tion to serve and to contribute? Perhaps he realizes that the great bulk of the 
Alumni are young, tied to new jobs and to new responsibilities, busy establish- 
ing homes, and possessing little time or money to call their own. Until they 
are available to share the burden, the work must be carried by those of 
experience in whose memories the nostalgia of a small, intimate campus 
still remains fresh. Second, these are individuals who have experienced the 
pitfalls, heartaches, successes, triumphs and discoveries of life. These are 
the ones who must plant the orchard from which the next generation will 
harvest the fruit. 

It is this older Alumnus, the "friend of gold" who now speaks to the 
younger Alumnus, the "friend of silver." It is he who sees the patterns of life 
emerging from our explosive and revolutionary age. He has moved through 
the Steam Age, the Electric Age, the Machine Age, the Flying Age, the day 
of Radio, the era of Television, into the Atomic Age and now the Space Age. 

He dares to believe that his generation will be remembered best for its 
contribution to civilization, and for efforts to bring freedom and self-determi- 
nation to the underprivileged around the globe. 

To the younger generation of Alumni, he states that the World will not 
be secured by men of small adventure. Those who want most, who are hungry 
and resentful and restless are going to make a furious challenge. 

The World of tomorrow holds great promise and no generation can avoid 
its encounter with destiny. 

The older Alumnus will continue to plow the furrow, and sail the ship, 
while you who are younger Alumnus prepare to meet the problems of his day. 
What will you do with all you possess; how will you make the World safe 
for man; how will you accommodate yourselves one to another, race to race, 
religion to religion, and nation to nation? Before you know it, you who are 
now "friends of silver" will be the "friends of gold." Tempus fugit! 

The Maryland Magazine 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



FEBRUARY 



22 Wrestling, Duke, Away. 

22 Swimming, North Carolina, 
Away. 

23 Basketball, Clemson, Home. 

23 Swimming, North Carolina State, 
Away. 

23 Wrestling, North Carolina, 

Away 
28 National Symphony Orchestra 



MARCH 

1 Swimming, South Carolina, 
Home 
1-2 Basketball, A. C. C Tourna- 
ment, Raleigh 
7, 8, 9 Swimming, A. C. C. Tourna- 
ment, Raleigh 
25 Maryland Day 
28, 29, 30 Wrestling, N. C. A. A., Kent. 
Ohio 

28, 29, 30 Swimming, N. C. A. A., Ral- 
eigh 



APRIL 



1 I Faster Recess Begins Alter Last 

Class 
16 Easter Recess Ends. 8 a.m. 



Study being made of the Life of H. L. Mencken 



A new biography of Maryland's great 
writer and critic, H. L. Mencken, is 
being written by Dr. Carl Bode, Pro- 
fessor of English. Dr. Bode is planning 
his work with the cooperation of 
August Mencken, brother of the writer, 
and with the support of Alfred Knopf, 
leading American publisher. The manu- 
script is expected to be completed in the 
summer of 1965. 

Dr. Bode began his collection of 
material last summer; among other 
things, he is the author of Mencken's 
biographical entry in Encyclopaedia 
Britannica. He is acquainted with 
August Mencken and has visited his 
home. 

"The cooperation of these two men 
is valuable," Dr. Bode said in discuss- 
ing his work. "Through Mr. August 
Mencken I will be able to see more of 
the biographical material than anyone 
else has to date. Through Mr. Knopf 
I will be able to learn of Mencken's 
literary life, for he was Mencken's 
publisher." 

"This will be a scholarly study of 



Mencken's life; a concentration on his 
life rather than his work. 

"Mencken's relationship to Maryland 
was an important one. Although he often 
criticized Maryland and Baltimore, he 
loved them; he always returned to them 
and always identified himself with them. 

"Mencken was the outstanding con- 
troversialist in the State in the 20th 
Century. But he had many sides. 

"He was a first class newspaperman. 
He maintained his Sunpapers affiliation 
most of his life. He wrote some of the 
liveliest columns in modern newspaper 
history, especially during his free-lance 
period. 

"He was also a fighting literary critic. 
He had an eclectic taste. He enjoyed 
and defended realists such as Theodore 
Dreiser, and at the same time could 
relish the elegant novels of James 
Branch Cabell. As a critic, he was 
particularly against inflated and pomp- 
ous writing and for honest and literal 
writing. 

"Mencken was also a serious thinker, 
as best indicated by his three published 



treatises including Treatise on the Gods, 
due to be reissued shortly. 

"He was an outspoken conservative 
in politics in the sense of 19th Century 
Liberalism. He felt it vital to speak his 
mind. 

"Mencken was an authority on the 
American language. His volume Amer- 
ican Language, with supplements, is a 
classic work." 

The development of the manuscript, 
due to be completed in June. 1965. is 
partially supported through a grant of 
the Graduate Research Council. Dr. 
Bode intends to make special use of the 
Maryland Room at the Enoch Pratt 
Library, which holds the best single 
collection of the works of Mencken. He 
also will review materials reposing in 
libraries in New York City. Princeton 
University, Yale University and Dart- 
mouth College. Dr. Bode will be inter- 
viewing such people as Hamilton Owens. 
a former editor of the Sun; Louis (Jnter- 
meyer, American poet, critic and an- 
thologist: and Mr. John Lohrfinck. who 
served as secretary to H. L. Mencken. 



January-February, 1963 



11 




The 1 2th Annual M Club Awards Banquet 




Athletes display their award trophies. From the left: 
Thomas W. Brown, All-America in baseball and football, 
received the John N. Guckeyson Memorial Award; David 
H. Crossan, outstanding tackle, received the James M. 
latum Memorial Award; Donald C. Staufjer. outstanding 
track athlete, received the Charles P. McCormick Award; 
John N. Belitza, outstanding pole vaulter, the Talbot T. 
Speer A ward. 




President Elkins presents the Distinguished Citizens Award 
to Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. 
Byron Raymond White, center, first member of the Foot- 
hall Hall of Fame to win the National Football Founda- 
tion Annual Gold Medal. Justice White received a law 
degree, Magna cum Laude, from Yale University. Dr. W. 
Lawrence Smallwood, President of M Club [right), looks on. 



12 



The Maryland Magazine 



AT ITS 12th annual banquet, the 
"M" Club presented its Distin- 
guished Citizens Award to Associate 
Justice of the United States Supreme 
Court, Byron White. The presentation 
was made by Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, 
President of the University. 

Justice White was elected to the 
Football Hall of Fame in 1954, and re- 
cently became the first such member to 
win the National Football Foundation 
Annual Gold Medal, previously award- 
ed to President Eisenhower, President 
Hoover, President Kennedy and General 
MacArthur, as football's highest honor. 
For three years at the University of Col- 
orado, Justice White was a star passer, 
punter and ball carrier. In 1937, he was 
second in the balloting for the Heisman 
Trophy, emblematic of the best in foot- 
ball. He played pro-ball with Pittsburgh 
and Detroit in the National League. He 
received his Law Degree from Yale, 
Magna cum Laude, and subsequently 
was appointed Law Clerk to Chief Jus- 
tice Vinson of the U. S. Supreme Court. 
President Kennedy named him Deputy 
Attorney General and last April ap- 
pointed him to the Supreme Court. 

A number of other awards were made 
to athletes and persons associated with 
sports activities at the presentations De- 
cember 8 at a Washington, D. C, hotel. 

Toastmaster for the evening was 
Dan Daniels, radio and television per- 
sonality. 

C. Robert Boucher, Vice President 
of the Club, presented the Charles P. 
McCormick Award to Donald C. Stauf- 
fer, track champion; the Talbot T. Speer 
Award to John N. Belitza, winner of 
a number of low and high hurdle 
championships; the A. V. Williams 
Award to Clayton A. Beardmore, mem- 
ber of the All-America Lacrosse Team 
in 1961 and 1962; and the John William 
Guckeyson Memorial Award to Thomas 
W. Brown, a two-letter man who has 
received All-America recognition in 
both football and baseball. 

The James M. Tatum Memorial 
Award was presented to David H. Cross- 
man as the outstanding tackle of the 
year. 

All America Awards were presented 
by David L. Brigham, Executive Secre- 
tary of the Alumni Association, to Clay- 
ton A. Beardmore, Lacrosse; John N. 
Belitza, Track; Thomas W. Brown, 
Baseball; and Donald C. Stauffer, 
Track. 

Clayton is an outstanding midfielder 
and opposing player. In 1958, he was 
named to all M.S.A. Lacrosse Team. He 
received the William P. Cole Memorial 
Award, 1961, and the 1961 Naval 
Academy's Seth Memorial Award. 



John was named to the NCAA All- 
Amcrican Track and Field Team, holds 
the Conference Pole Vault Record; took 
second place in the National A.A.U. 
Championships, and placed fifth in 
World Rankings. 

Thomas was All-Conference in base- 
ball his Sophomore and Junior years. 
and All-America in 1962. In baseball. 
he already holds the AAC record lor 
the highest batting average, and boasts 
innumerable accomplishments in foot- 
ball, including All-America recognition. 

Donald was named to the NCAA 
All-American Track and Field Team. 
stands eighth in World Rankings, and 
was high point scorer for the University 
Team in 1961-1962. He and Belitza 
turned in the best performances in the 
NCAA ever made by University of 
Maryland track men. 

The Atlantic Coast Conference Cham- 
pionship Coaches Award went to Bill 
Campbell, Swimming; Jim Kehoe, 
Track; William E. "Sully" Krause, 
Wrestling; and Doyle P. Royal, Soccer. 

Persons selected for honorary mem- 
bership in the "M" Club were: 

Edward Bean, outstanding golfer, 
past Club Champion for the Prince 
Georges Country Club; Joseph C. Blair, 
long-time University of Maryland Sports 
Publicity Director and present Publicist 
for the Washington Redskins; M. S. 
"Mit" Collins, owner of the American 
Publishing Company, sports publication 
plant; Augustus Hines, long-time friend 
of Maryland athletics; and Justice Byron 
White, recipient of the year's Outstand- 
ing Citizens Award. 

The State of Maryland Athletic Hall 
of Fame Awards were presented by 
Joseph H. Deckman, Treasurer of the 
Club. They went to: the late George 
"KO" Chaney, professional boxer from 
1910 to 1925, in the bantam weight, 
feather weight and lightweight classes; 
Albert B. Heagy, all-around Maryland 
athlete and Past President of the "M" 
Club; William B. "Swish" Nicholson, 
major league baseball player with the 
Philadelphia Athletics, Chicago Cubs 
and Philadelphia Phillies; and C. Loun- 
des Johnson, Maryland yachtsman and 
designer of yachts, including the Comet 
Class Yacht. 

Recently named to Helms Hall, Na- 
tional Sports Shrine, were two Mary- 
land immortals, Louis W. "Bozey" 
Berger, first All-America Cage star at 
the University in 1932, and at present 
Superintendent of Building Services at 
the University; and H. Burton "Ship" 
Shipley, Dean of Maryland Coaches, 
who retired in 1960, after a coaching 
span of 24 years. 



Charles I*. McCormick 
Named k Man of Year' 

( haiies P, Md ornnek. ( haiinian ol 

the Board oi Regents, was named "Man 
ot the Year — 1962" by the Advertising 
( lull oi Baltimore at a luncheon on 1 1 
cember 5 in the Emerson Hotel ball- 
room. 

The year, 1962, marked the golden 
service anniversary ol Mi. Md ornnek 

with McCormick & Company and the 
thirtieth anniversary ol his progressive 

management philosophy. 

The "Man of the Year" award is the 
result of the experience and judgment 
of a special Advertising Club commit- 
tee composed of outstanding business 
and civic leaders in Baltimore. 

J. Harold Grady, then Mayor of Bal- 
timore, was present at the award-giving 
festivities and offered his personal and 
official congratulations to Mr. McCor- 
mick on behalf of the people of Balti- 
more. 

The Honorable J. Millard Tawes, 
Governor of Maryland, also attended 
and praised Mr. McCormick for the in- 
terest he showed in the growth of indus- 
try by his maintenance of his firm's 
world headquarters in Baltimore, as 
McCormick Company grew on a global 
scale. The Governor also recognized 
civic contributions made by Mr. McCor- 
mick on a local, regional and national 
basis. 



Cohen 'Portrait' Published 

Dr. Leonora Cohen Rosenfield, As- 
sociate Professor of Foreign Lan- 
guages, has written the first book in 
English about her father, the noted 
philosopher Morris R. Cohen. 

Portrait of a Philosopher is a color- 
ful and candid picture of Cohen who 
lived from 1880 to 1947. Youthful 
diaries, love letters, unpublished 
manuscripts and over 500 contempo- 
rary letters have been used to paint 
an intellectual and social picture of 
the man and his age. 

His vast correspondence with 
friends, students, and associates in- 
cluded Felix Frankfurter, his former 
Harvard roommate. Justice Oliver 
Wendell Holmes, Albert Einstein. Ed- 
win Arlington Robinson, George San- 
tayana, William James, John Dewey. 
Harold Laski, Benjamin Cardozo, 
Sidney Hook, Learned Hand, Roscoe 
Pound, Bertrand Russell. H. L. Menc- 
ken, and others. 

A professor at the City College of 
New York, Harvard and the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, Cohen greatly in- 
fluenced Twentieth Century law. logic 
and social science. A three-and-one- 



January-February, 1963 



13 



half million dollar library has been 
erected in his name at the City Col- 
lege of New York. 

Dr. Rosenlield. whose publications 
on French literature and philosophy 
are well known, applied the tech- 
niques of the French prose masters 
in writing the biography. 

Born in Manhattan. Dr. Rosenlield 
has receive degrees from Smith Col- 
lege, the University of Grenoble, the 
Sorbonne, and Columbia University. 

She is the author of From Beast- 
machine to Man-machine with a pref- 
ace by Paul Hazard of the French 
Academy, and Discovering Plato, 
which she translated from the French 
of Alexandre Koyre. She has edited 
her father's posthumous works and 
contributed to the third volume of 
Cabeen, A Critical Bibliography of 
French Literature, as well as to many 
historical magazines published here 
and abroad. 

Dr. Rosenfield is a member of Phi 
Beta Kappa. She is married to a Wash- 
ington lawyer, Harry Rosenfield, and 
is the mother of a daughter, Marianne. 

Portrait of a Philosopher: Morris 
R. Cohen in Life and Letters is pub- 
lished by Harcourt, Brace and World, 
Inc. 

Seniors Present 
Peter, Paul, Mary 

The Senior Class of the University will 
present the folk-singing trio, Peter, Paul 
& Mary, between 8:30 and 10:30 p.m. 
on April 27 at the Cole Activities Field 
House. 

Choice seats are being reserved for 
alumni, who may purchase tickets for 
$2.50 each by sending the money and 
an enclosed self-addressed envelope to 
Alumni Tickets, Post Office Box 80, 
College Park, Maryland. Tickets will 
also be on sale on campus and at the 
door. Profits will be given to the Mc- 
Kcldin Library. 

1963 Speakers Bureau Issued 

More than 1 30 professors and staff mem- 
bers of the University of Maryland are 
listed in the 1963 Speakers Bureau, a 
roster of speakers on more than 400 
subjects who are available for appear- 
ances before civic, service, and social 
organizations. 

The Bureau offers a wide range of tal- 
ents and topics as a public service. 

A listing of the speakers and subjects 
are available to any organization which 
contacts The Speakers Bureau, North 
Administration Building, University of 
Maryland. College Park. To contact the 
Bureau by telephone, dial WArrield 
7-3800. extension 253. 







E. E. Powell 



C. M. White 



Born of Fire 






OUT OF A FIRE WHICH LEVELED THE 
main building of Maryland Agri- 
cultural College fifty years ago, came 
the flame which initiated Gamma Pi, 
destined to become Delta Phi of Sigma 
Nu Fraternity — the first fraternity at 
College Park. Organized in April 1913, 
the fraternity has matured with giant 
strides. 

Following the fire in November of 
1912, students were scattered in private 
homes in College Park, Riverdale, Ber- 
wyn and Hyattsville. This had been a 
strict military school, students were 
quartered in barracks, under military 
discipline, and no fraternities were 
allowed. 

In the new situation, eight members 
of the Senior Class organized into 
a fraternity. Faculty approval was 
another major problem. Accordingly 
three Seniors were appointed as a com- 
mittee to endeavor to secure recognition 
from the faculty of the College so the 
group could proceed with its organiza- 
tion, and attract new pledges. Through 
the cooperation of two professors, 
Thomas H. Spence and F. B. Bomberg- 
cr, the approval was granted, and the 
eight Seniors agreed to the name 
"Gamma Pi." 

Two outstanding alumni survive from 
the founding eight. One is E. E. Powell 
of Towson, who is universally known 
as the "Father of Lacrosse" at Mary- 
land. Mr. Powell organized the first 
Maryland Lacrosse team in 1910. Fol- 
lowing graduation, he was a road build- 
er in Western Maryland, and later, in 
building construction in both New York 
and Connecticut. He served 18 months 
in France in World War I, and then 
held the following positions — Office 
Manager for Mack Truck; Field Man- 



ager of Traffic Analysis with the Bureau 
of Public Roads in Pennsylvania and 
Illinois, and from 1925 to 1956 with the 
Black & Decker Co. in Towson. 

The second remaining founder is 
Charles M. White of Cleveland, Ohio. 
Mr. White, a devoted supporter of the 
University, began a career in the steel 
industry, which required the physical 
strength of youth. He eventually became 
Chairman of the Board of Republic 
Steel, a position from which he recently 
retired. Perhaps the spark which ignited 
this leader was found in the opportunity 
to organize a fraternity "Born by Fire." 

The flaming torch was adopted as the 
symbol for the fraternity pin, and was 
designed in the shape of a quadrangle. 
In each of the four corners is a small 
ruby, signifying the four corners of the 
earth. Between each ruby are four 
pearls, representing the original eight 
seniors, and eight pledges to be taken 
in before the seniors graduated. 

The other founders were Milton E. 
Davis, Ralph S. Healy, Hugh S. Koehler, 
Nathanial A. LeSavoy, Ezekial I. Mer- 
rick, and William K. Robinson. 

On this Fiftieth Anniversary, a com- 
mittee, headed by Powell, with a great 
assist from Austin C. Diggs, is attempt- 
ing the organization of a strong active 
alumni group. More than 700 have 
joined this fraternity during the half- 
century. In a recent appeal Mr. Diggs 
offered the following significant words 
to all fraternity actives and alumni — 
"We may well be proud of the spirit 
which created our organization. Our 
University is growing in stature, and 
our fraternity must keep pace. When we 
help our fraternity, we assist worthy 
young men, and we help the University." 



14 



The Maryland Magazine 



Some Recent Grants 
to the University 

For support of research on systematics 
of plethodontid salamanders. 

National Science Foundation to De- 
partment of Zoology 
$ 1 8,000. 

For research participation for college 
teachers program. 

National Science Foundation to De- 
partment of Physics and Astronomy 
$26,500. 

* 

To develop equipment and methods for 
measuring plasma temperatures up to 
the 20,000° K range hy means of spec- 
tral line reversal. 

U. S. Navy to Institute of Fluid 
Dynamics 
$9,992.32. 

* 

For research on African agricultural 
patterns. 

National Science Foundation to De- 
partment of Geography 
$17,900. 

* 

For establishment of a science teaching 

center. 

National Science Teachers Associa- 
tion to the College of Education 
$1,500. 

To supplement tuition of an estimated 
250 students in the educational program 
of the laboratory. 

U. S. Naval Ordnance Laboratory 

to University College 

$5,000. 

For study of scientific and technical 
manpower resources in space sciences 
and technology in the U.S.S.R. — a pilot 
project. 

National Science Foundation to De- 
partment of Physics and Astrono- 
my 

$23,700. 

* 

For research on the limiting factors in 
the mass culture of unicellar algae. 

U. S. Navy to Department of Bot- 
any 
$11,000. 

For research on topological spaces and 
linear operators. 

National Science Foundation to De- 
partment of Mathematics 
$65,000. 




Coach Cronin receives a Silver Bowl 

University Golf Coach Frank Cronin receives a silver bowl in appreciation for 
his work with the University of Maryland's Women's Golf Association. 

Organized last year, the 50-member club is made up of faculty wives, alumni and 
distaff members of the Terrapin Club. 

From left to right, Mrs. Libby Bean, Mr. Cronin, Mrs. Emeline Foster and Mrs. 
Dorothey Elkins. 

In addition to the presentation, which was made at a luncheon in the home of 
Mrs. Elkins, an annual tournament was established in honor of the popular golf 
coach. To be known as the Frank Cronin Golf Tournament, it will be held at 
College Park beginning in 1963. Winners of the event will receive a small replica 
of the silver bowl. 



For research on turbulent transport 
coefficients. 

National Science Foundation to De- 
partment of Chemical Engineering 
$33,000. 

For comparative study of ionic conduct- 
ances in various axon populations. 

National Science Foundation to 

School of Medicine 

$66,200. 

For a single unit study of auditory 
localization. 

National Science Foundation to 

School of Medicine 

$68,000. 

To study the feasibility of annexing to 
Town of Elkton surrounding unincor- 
porated areas. 

Maryland State Planning Depart- 
ment to Municipal Technical Ad- 
visory Service, College of Business 
and Public Administration 
$400. 



To develop a pilot educational program 
designed to improve the efficiency of 
agricultural marketing firms. 

United States Department of Agri- 
culture to department of agrk ii - 
turai Economics 
$10,000. 

To establish a Research Center at the 
School of Social Work in Baltimore. 

Community Research Associates, 
Inc. to the University 
$53,000. 

For research related to saline water. 

U. S. Department of the Interior 
to Department of Chemistry 

$77,798. 

For a study of ion association in cer- 
tain electrolytic compounds. 

Atomic Energy Commission to De- 
partment of Chemistry 

$21,725. 



January-February, J 963 



15 




SECONDARY 

EDUCATION 

IN THE SIXTIES 



16 



TODAY SECONDARY EDUCATION ABOUNDS WITH EXCITEMENT, CHALLENGE AND 
opportunity. Never before has our country so openly recognized the vast his- 
torical contribution as well as the unlimited potential of mass education dedi- 
cated to the optimum development of each and every individual in our virtual 
sea of bubbling teenagers. Never before has our citizenry placed so many demands 
on mass education but all the while accompanying these demands with a full meas- 
ure of confidence so necessary for such a monumental undertaking. 

These unprecedented demands stem from a long line of recent world develop- 
ments. I refer to recent developments in the area of the sciences, technology and 
international relations. Consider, if you will, that President John F. Kennedy pre- 
dicts that we must find 25,000 new jobs every week for the next ten years to accom- 
modate those workers who are displaced by machines — automation. Remember, also, 
that astronaut Schirra recently became the ninth man to ride a rocket from the earth. 
"Man in Space" dates back only to April 12, 1961 when Russian Major Yuri Ga- 
gorian survived one earth orbit in one hour and 48 minutes. Only 19 months later 
astronaut Walter M. Schirra, Jr. made 6 orbits around the earth in a little over 9 
hours and traveled 160,000 miles. This fantastic progress in the man-in-space pro- 
gram has occurred in a span of time less than it would take a high school sopho- 
more to graduate from high school. 

The Maryland Magazine 



THUS TODAY'S CHILDREN EMERGE FROM 12 YEARS 
of public education into a world whose technolog- 
ical development and political and social status 
differs considerably from that of the world into 
which he was born. Undoubtedly, the obvious unrest 
among nations, the visible evidence that the United States 
no longer has a monopoly on the world's know-how and 
the long overdue rediscovery that our country and its 
schools have, in fact, a common destiny, have stimulated 
widespread public thought and action. Teachers in our 
secondary schools must prepare today's children to face 
a world we can, at best, only imagine. The decision be- 
tween the colossal disaster of complete nuclear destruction 
or mutual world tranquility is riding on the shoulders of 
these youngsters. The implications for better secondary 
education are staggering. 

Public opinions aroused by these timely events, found 
at first a ready answer to our problems — we failed to train 
enough scientists and technicians. Thus the prime course 
of our newly recognized inferiority, it was proclaimed, was 
our educational system. Unfortunately for educators, a 
collective scapegoat was found to be more guilty than 
others. This scapegoat was "Progressive Education." Many 
people, some competent, and some not so competent, felt 
impelled to offer some temporary remedies, if not magic 
panaceas. "Do away with the frills," "Establish a National 
Curriculum with National Standards," "Make Subjects 
Tougher," "Assign more homework," etc. Yes, some even 
suggested the wholesale transplanting of the British or the 
Russian educational system. 

For a considerable number of years prior to the Russian 
breakthrough in space, American education was singularly 
free from tension of a truly philosophical sort. There were 
problems, naturally, but these problems were largely in 
the realm of practical everyday storekeeping caused largely 
by the ever increasing school population and its related 
implications. For educators and laymen alike, philosophy 
of American education was a topic of no great concern. 
Educational philosophy seemed to survive on its reputa- 
tion alone. The great educational philosopher, Boyd H. 
Bode, once remarked that the only good by-product of 
wars and depressions was that they prodded men to think. 
Whether secondary education is suffering war or depression 
or both is of little consequence. The point is, however, 
that there is tension and unrest more than enough to call 
for new and different ways of behaving. Nourished by 
unrest, philosophy thrives. 

It is possible to mention here only a few of the more 
significant outcomes of this great unrest. These outcomes 
have been generated by educational philosophy, educa- 
tional practitioners, academic colleagues, scientists and 
various Federal Agencies. 



The hard facts of reality admit to nearly 10,000 
one-room schools scattered throughout the United States 
as unmistakable vestiges of the truly local origin and char- 
acter of public education in this country. Fourteen thou- 
sand of the 42,000 school districts in the United States 
provide education for fewer than 50 pupils. On the other 
hand this past September (1962) 39 million youngsters 
were greeted by nearly 1,750,000 teachers in our ele- 
mentary and secondary schools. 



A rural school near Washington, D. C. 




Unprecedented Broad Studies 
of Secondary Education 

The Conant Reports 

Dr. Conant, under a grant made possible by the Car- 
negie Corporation of New York conducted a planned study 
of American high schools and junior high schools through 
on-the-spot observations in many schools throughout the 
United States. These studies were published as The Amer- 
ican High School Today (McGraw-Hill 1959) and Edu- 
cation in the Junior High School Year (Educational Test- 
ing Service, 1960). Important among the recommendations 
set forth by Dr. Conant in these reports were (1) con- 
tinued support for the comprehensive high school, (2) 
high school size such as to produce a graduation class of 
not less than 100 students, (3)6 years of a single foreign 
language, (4) a full-time specialist in guidance and testing 
for every 250-300 pupils (junior high), (5) homework 
of one hour per day in grade seven to two hours per day 



by DR. ORVAL L. ULRY, Professor of Education, on leave to 
New Delhi, India, where he is serving as Secondary Education Advisor to the Agency 
for International Development. 

Dr. Ulry received his Ph.D. from the Ohio State University. He served as Di- 
rector of Student Teaching at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, and as Director of 
the Summer School Program at the University of Maryland. 

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CARL PURCELL 

NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 



January-February, 1963 



17 



by grade 9. The Conant reports have been widely dis- 
tributed and read. School boards throughout the 50 states 
are attempting to improve their schools in light of recom- 
mendations in these reports. Without doubt, no one has 
done more in the past quarter century to arouse the public 
to the singular fact that schools are important and that 
education does matter. His direct approach of reporting 
findings and suggesting realistic recommendations makes 
his reports both readable and effective. 



Project Talent 

Project talent essentially involves a national inventory 
of aptitudes and abilities of approximately half a million 
students obtained by a representative sampling (5% 
sample) of high schools throughout the United States. 
The survey was conducted by the University of Pittsburgh 
and was supported by the United States Office of Educa- 
tion with assistance from the National Institute of Mental 
Health and the Office of Naval Reserve. 

What kinds of information will help teachers to improve 
instructional programs? How can teachers better help to 
meet the vocational needs of youngsters? What can 
teachers do to enable each student to realize his full po- 
tential? Project talent, a new broad dimension in educa- 
tional research, was designed to help provide answers to 
these and many other important questions concerning the 
potential talent of boys and girls in the nation's secondary 
schools. 

This mountain of vital data that is being amassed will 
most assuredly provide source material for research on 
educational and teaching practices which will be invaluable 
in helping students to reach their full potential. 



Broad Curriculum Studies 

Over the past several years the national science 
Foundation has stimulated and supported new curriculum 
developments focused largely on the secondary schools of 
the nation. Scientists, mathematicians, classroom teachers 
and educators have been engaged in a widespread, coopera- 
tive effort to produce new high school programs in physics, 
biology, chemistry and mathematics. Excitingly new ma- 
terials have been prepared in physics, chemistry and bi- 
ology. In these science curriculums up-to-date content is 
carefully guided through a series of films, laboratory ex- 
periments, and single apparatus. The biology curriculum 
provides a six-week block of laboratory experiences cen- 
tered around plant and animal growth and development. 
Several outstanding features of these new curricula are 
unique in at least the following ways: (1) They contain 
the most recent content, (2) They incorporate the trial 
and error procedure in that they are written, tried, re- 
written, etc. (3) They present a truly experimental ap- 
proach to science through a new emphasis on the labora- 
tory, (4) They include wide-spread participation by sci- 
entists and, (5) They enjoy a reasonably sound financial 
backing through Federal grants. 

Workers at the University of Illinois, the University of 
Maryland and the School Mathematics Study Group at 
Yale University have combined their earlier individual 
efforts to provide new and exciting curriculum materials 
in mathematics from grades 7 to 12. These new materials 



also have been written, tried and re-written until each 
respective committee was more or less satisfied with the 
field results obtained. These programs have strength 
in that (1) they present mathematics as a logical tool, 

(2) word usage and definitions have been sharpened and 

(3) meaning replaces sheer manipulation. 

Almost too new to mention but certainly too worthy to 
omit is the new curriculum study entitled: "Project Eng- 
lish." Three curriculum study centers in English began 
operating in April of 1962, with funds from the United 
States Office of Education, ( 1 ) Carnegie Institute of Tech- 
nology, (2) The University of Nebraska and (3) North- 
western University. These centers, designed to improve 
the teaching of English on all levels, will have $720,000 
at their disposal over a 5-year period. They will experiment 
with the development of curricula that will help students 
learn English more systematically. It is thought that this 
can be done by a meaningful ordering of course content 
along with a serious consideration of the students' learning 
processes. More attention, it is said, is to be given to 
linguistics — the science of the language itself. 



Relatively New Programs 
of Federal Aid to Education 

Federal aid to education dates back to the ordi- 
nance of 1785, the ordinance of 1787 and the Morrill Act 
of 1862. Through the years, Federal Aid to education has 
increased rather consistently. Over these same years Fed- 
eral Aid has tended to become more specific and more 
protected. That is to say, not since the ordinance of 1785 
and later the Land Grant Act has Federal Aid to education 
been offered in such broad general terms. More recent 
aid has been in the form of assistance to a specific segment 
or function of education, i.e. school lunch, surplus food, 
vocational home economics, vocational agriculture. This 
trend may be changing. 



National Science Foundation 

The National Science Foundation was created by the 
81st Congress in 1950 to develop and encourage the pur- 
suit of a national policy for the promotion of education in 
the sciences. 

This past summer (1962) 20,000 high school and 
2,000 college teachers of science, mathematics and engi- 
neering attended 481 institutes supported by N.S.F. The 
247 colleges and universities that conducted these insti- 
tutes received grants totaling 26.4 millions. Since N.S.F.'s 
program of summer institutes for science, math and engi- 
neering teachers was established in 1953, 10,000 college 
teachers have received training at 256 institutes and 
85,000 high school teachers have received training at 
1,113 institutes. These figures represent about 4% of the 
college teachers in their fields and 22% of the high school 
teachers. This academic year (1962-63) begins the 7th 
year of N.S.F. sponsored academic year institutes. There 
are 1,700 secondary teachers and 100 college teachers of 
science and mathematics currently enrolled in academic 
year institutes. 



18 



The Maryland Magazine 



In addition, N.S.F. grants totaling $71 1,500 were made 
to 21 institutions in 18 states to help support summer in- 
stitutes for about 700 public and private elementary school 
staff members during the summer of 1962. Since this pro- 
gram was launched 46 institutes have been conducted for 
1,726 elementary school teachers or about 0.2 percent of 
the elementary school science and mathematics teachers. 



National Defense Education Act 

This additional Federal Aid act was hurried into being 
in 1958 close on the heels of Sputnik. Basically, it was 
designed to bolster our secondary school programs by pro- 
viding Federal Aid in the areas of science, mathematics, 
modern foreign language, guidance and counseling, stu- 
dent loans and graduate fellowships (college level). This 
title authorized three related programs, ( 1 ) a program of 
grants to state educational agencies for projects of local 
educational agencies for the acquisition of laboratory or 
other special equipment for science, mathematics, or mod- 
ern foreign language teaching in public elementary or 
secondary schools or junior colleges, and for minor re- 
modeling of laboratory or other space to be used for such 
equipment, (2) a program of loans to non-profit, private 
elementary and secondary schools for the same types of 
projects; and (3) a program of grants to state educational 



agencies for expansion or improvement of supervisory or 
related services in public elementary and secondary schools 
and junior colleges in science, mathematics, and modern 
foreign language instruction, and for administration of the 
state program. For example, over 7 million dollars was 
allocated to federally financed summer and acadcmic-ycar 
institutes for the training and/or updating of foreign lan- 
guage teachers. An additional 7 million was allocated for 
the same types of institutes for personnel in counseling 
and guidance. 



The Kennedy Administration s Proposed 
Federal Aid to Education 

The administration bill for Federal grants to public ele- 
mentary and secondary schools called for approximately 
3 billions of dollars. This amount was to be granted over 
a three-year period and could have been used for school 
construction and/or teachers' salaries. The grant was to 
be made to the states and the decision as to the expendi- 
ture was to be that of each respective state. This bill is 
caught up in the two heavy hands of fear of Federal control 
and separation of church and state. The outcome of the 
administration aid to education bill remains to be settled 
in still another Congress. 



New modern schools are found in most American communities. 




New Teaching Devices and Procedures 



Educational Television 

The "continental classroom" set a new high in 
mass media instruction in the United States. High level, 
academically sophisticated courses in physics, chemistry, 
biology and American Government have been beamed out 
in all directions over a national television network system. 
Local commercial stations throughout the nation devote 
public services time to such adult education programs as 
Human Development, Religion, Shorthand, Foreign Lan- 
guage, to mention only a few. On April 1 1, 1952 the Fed- 
eral Communications Commission set aside 242 channels 
for non-commercial stations. More than a year of plan- 
ning and hard work ensued before the first educational 
station went on the air. Now, ten years later, a network 
(National Educational Television) of sixty-seven affiliated 
educational stations stands ready to serve many communi- 
ties throughout the nation. 

Dave Garroway will be host for and assist in the prep- 
aration of a series on science, "Exploring the Universe," 
for the National Educational Television network. The 
eleven half-hour programs have been made possible by a 
grant from the National Science Foundation. The series 
will be shown on the sixty-seven network stations across 
the country during the 1962-63 television season. 

Team Teaching 

In 1956 the National Association of Secondary School 
Principals established a commission to look at the deepen- 
ing problem of improving educational opportunities in the 
face of an acute shortage of teachers. For more than four 
years the commission encouraged, sponsored and worked 
with various experiments in nearly 100 junior and senior 
high schools across the nation. As a result of these studies 
some rather drastic new guides to better schools have been 



proposed by this group. Dr. Lloyd Trump, Executive 
Secretary of the National Association of Secondary School 
Principals, suggests that this report is, in fact, the story 
of the coming of a new kind of secondary education in 
America — a plan for the schools of the future. In this 
proposal school learning would take place through the 
approach of large groups, very small groups and individual 
study. Instruction would be done by a team of teachers 
(usually between 3 and 6) jointly responsible for plan- 
ning, carrying out and evaluating an educational program 
for a given group of children (usually 120-200). The 
team-teaching approach utilizes classrooms of various sizes 
during the normal school day and school week. A class of 
1 20-200 students would not be uncommon on a day when 
a basic concept is to be introduced. On other days of the 
week, it may be desirable to divide the group into several 
classes of 10-15 or one or two teachers may work with 
groups of 100 or more. Some students may spend up to 
20-24 hours weekly in independent study. School plants 
must be designed for this new-type program, with fewer 
rooms of the traditional capacity of 30-35 and with more 
rooms of 100-200 and 10-15 capacity. 

At present there are about 100 communities throughout 
the United States engaged in one form or another of team 
teaching. Communities that are experimenting with team 
teaching include, Norwalk, Connecticut; Madison, Wis- 
consin; Jefferson County, Colorado; Evanston, Illinois. 



Programmed Learning 

In only a short span of 2 or 3 years the term "pro- 
grammed learning" has enjoyed widespread lip service 
sometimes with understanding but too often void of real 
meaning. Generally speaking, programmed learning refers 
to a method of arranging instruction in a sequential form 



An electronically equipped language laboratory 





A class utilizing individual teaching machines 



according to such principles as: (1) material must be 
arranged in a series of logical or psychological steps, each 
of which may be accomplished by the learner, (2) learner 
must choose an answer or a solution at each step of the 
program, (3) learners must be reinforced after each an- 
swer or solution by knowing immediately if the answer 
is correct. 

Programs of instructions may be presented to the learner 
in a number of interesting ways. Two of the more common 
ways are the teaching machine, and the programmed text. 
Teaching machines are designed for the individual student 
rather than for mass instruction. The machine requires 
active responses from the student who must manipulate it 
in some manner to indicate his responses to questions or 
problems presented. The psychological value of teaching 
machines may well prove to be their strongest point. Dr. 
B. F. Skinner of Harvard University states "something 
good happens to a child with each response when he is 
using a teaching machine. He is conditioned to learning; 
the machine attracts his attention and then rewards him 
for learning." Rarely mentioned as an instructional resource 
five years ago, the use of teaching machines is beginning 
to emerge beyond the experimental stages in many school 
systems. For example, high schools in Pittsburgh have 
taught physics by machines. Roanoke, Virginia, used ma- 
chines to teach elementary algebra, Youngstown, Ohio, 
has select elementary and junior high school students using 
machines for arithmetic instruction. Several colleges and 
universities are teaching basic statistics by machines. Pro- 
grams are already available in Spanish, French, logic, 
arithmetic, spelling, music, physics, to mention only a few. 
The cost of mechanizing learning is now extremely high, 
but the trend is toward less expensive machines and pro- 
grams. Teaching machine costs now range roughly from 
$20.00 to $5,000.00. 

Programmed texts sometimes referred to as "scramble 
texts" present the programmed materials in a more con- 
ventional manner as an actual bound textbook, or as a series 
of cards arranged on rings so that they can be flipped over 
at will. Students do not pick up a programmed text and 
read continuously page by page. Instead, the pages are 
often divided into 6 or 8 alternate colored bands that 
direct the student to proceed in one band and then only 



as directed. In one popular scramble book in English the 
student must work his way from first page to last page 
a total of 12 times before he has finished all of the prob- 
lems presented. As the student progresses successfully 
through the book he is rewarded with answers that are 
found on the pages that present the new problem. Six 
schools in the District of Columbia arc currently experi- 
menting with programmed textbooks in English. 



In Summary 



By way of summary then, secondary education has most 
assuredly come of age in the past few years. The dramatic 
need for drastic change to replace simple tinkering has 
loomed large of late. Educational philosophy of the past 
two decades has been sharply challenged. Current method- 
ology too often characterized by recitation and memory 
work with 30 students and one teacher per room has been 
severely questioned. The usual scope and sequence of 
courses has been uprooted. This general ferment in secon- 
dary education has been an outgrowth of frustrations of 
continuous population explosion, fantastic growth of or- 
ganized knowledge, unprecedented world competition and 
increased Federal Aid to education. 

Some of the more obvious attempts to meet these new 
challenges include comprehensive studies of the junior 
and senior high schools, broad curriculum studies in cer- 
tain subject matter fields, national inventory of aptitudes 
and abilities of high school youngsters, relatively new 
and substantial programs of Federal Aid to certain specific 
programs, and new teaching procedures, including edu- 
cational television, team teaching and teaching machines. 

It is much too early to assess these various experimental 
and demonstrational programs. Time and a new and greater 
emphasis upon hard research will furnish some clues. 
Throughout these exciting adjustments and growing pains 
let us not forget the most important ingredient of secondary 
eduction — the student. May we ever provide for him a 
curriculum that is interesting and challenging, free him 
to proceed at a rate commensurate with his capabilities 
and hold him until he has reached his optimum potential. 



January-February, 1963 



21 



InSide Maryland SpOrtS by Neil La Bar Director ofMd. Sports Information 



MOST FOOTBALL FANS LIKE A GAME THAT IS CLOSE. 
A football fan attending a Maryland game in the 
four years that Coach Tom Nugent has been at the helm 
has had a particularly exciting day if average scores are 
any indication. In the 40 games that Nugent has coached 
at Maryland, the Terp elevens have scored 681 points 
for an average of 17.025 per game. The Maryland defense 
has allowed 623 points for a 15.575 average. The differ- 
ence — 1.45 points per game. 
The Terps have won 24 and 
lost 16 in the four seasons. 
Half of the wins have been 
by less than a touchdown. 
Duke Wyre, Maryland's 
popular head trainer, was 
trainer of the South Squad 
in the annual Blue-Gray 
football game in Montgom- 
ery, Alabama, December 
29th. Wyre joined Tom Nu- 
gent, the Terrapins' head 
football coach, in the an- 
nual classic. Wyre is consid- 
ered tops in the training 

field and was one of eight trainers selected for the 1960 
Olympics in Rome. 




VARSITY 


BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 






AND SCORES 




Date 




Opponent 


Location 


December 


1 


PENN STATE (61-62) 


Home 




4 


GEORGETOWN (70-79) 


Away 




8 


*duke (56-92) 


Away 




11 


*NORTH CAROLINA STATE 








(74-76) 


Home 




15 


*VIRGINIA (67-61) 


Away 




19 


*WAKE FOREST (74-85) 


Home 


January 


5 


*south Carolina (68-63) Home 




8 


GEORGE WASHINGTON 








(74-72) 


Home 




12 


NAVY (67-61) 


Home 




14 


*north Carolina (56-78) Home 




19 


*NORTH CAROLINA STATE 


Away 


February 


1 


GEORGE WASHINGTON 


Away 




4 


GEORGETOWN 


Home 




7 


*NORTH CAROLINA 


Away 




9 


*CLEMSON 


Away 




11 


*SOUTH CAROLINA 


Away 




14 


*WAKE FOREST 


Away 




16 


"VIRGINIA 


Home 




19 


*DUKE 


Home 




23 


*CLEMSON 


Home 


* Atlantic Coast Conference Game 





TURNING TO WRESTLING 

A wrestling match is normally stopped for one of three 
reasons. A fall which ends the match, an occasional injury 
which causes a temporary halt, and a new gimmick for 
catching your breath, dropping a contact lens on the mat. 

However, Referee Eugene Moran was faced with a 
different problem at the Maryland- Virginia match. During 
the middle of the 130- pound match, a boxer jumped out 
on the mat in Cole Field House. No one knows how he 
got in, but he wasn't satisfied with his seat in the stands 
and wanted to get a better view of the action, and what 
better place than right on the mat. 

Referee Moran stopped the match and everyone tried 
to catch the boxer. Finally, veteran Terp coach Sully 
Krouse coralled him and had him sit on the Maryland side. 

Wait a minute . . . the boxer wasn't the prize-fighter 
type boxer but rather a friendly canine. It is doubtful 
that the rooting of the pooch helped the outcome of the 
match as the Terps won, 23-2. 



VARSITY BASKETBALL 


ROSTER 




No. Name, High School Pos. Age 


Class 


Ht. 


Wt. 


20 * Robert Eicher G 21 


Sr. 


6-2 


180 


GREENSBURG, PA. 








25 * Jerry Greenspan F 21 


Sr. 


6-6 


220 


WEEQUAHIC, NEWARK, N. J. 








32 Gerald Bynan G 21 


So. 


6-0 


155 


HEIDELBERG, GERMANY 








34 Robert Lewis F 20 


So. 


6-4 


202 


NORTHWOOD, SILVER SPRING 








35 * Connie Carpenter F 24 


Sr. 


6-4 


190 


NORWALK, CONN. 








40 Sam McWilliams G 20 


So. 


6-1 


185 


BULLIS PREP, WASHINGTON, D. C 








44 Raymond Maxwell G 19 


So. 


5-10 


150 


LANSDOWNS-ALDAN, PA. 








45 Phillip Carlson F 19 


So. 


6-4 


170 


WILSON, TACOMA, WASH. 








50 * Joseph Barton C 21 


Jr. 


6-7 


220 


BEAVERDALE-WILMORE, BEAVERDALE, 


PA. 




54 * Scott Ferguson C 21 


Jr. 


6-8 


225 


ST. FRANCIS PREP, HANOVER, PA 








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HEAD COACH: H. A. "Bud" Millikan 








ASSISTANT COACH: Frank Fellows, 


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MANAGER: Dan Sweeney 








* Denotes Letterman 









22 



The Maryland Magazine 



Early Admission Policy 



A new admissions policy at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland will enable above-aver- 
age Maryland high school students to 
apply earlier for admission, it was an- 
nounced recently. 

Beginning this fall, the University 
will notify these students regarding ad- 
mission during the fall and early winter 
months, provided they have earned at 
least a "B" average in major subjects 
during the junior year in high school. 

"The University feels that this earlier 
admission program, in keeping with its 
emphasis on excellence in scholarship, 
will give recognition to above-average 
high school seniors without altering its 
basic admission requirements," G. Wat- 
son Algire, director of admissions, said. 



He explained that early admission 
letters would be issued on a provisional 
basis, the provisions being: ( I ) receipt 
of the complete high school record and 
certification of graduation at the end 
of the senior year, and ( 2 ) receipt ol 
the scores on the American College lest 
which all students are required to sub- 
mit. 

High school students who do not have 
a "B" average at the end of the junior 
year but meet University admission re- 
quirements can apply on the basis ol 
grades up to the end of the first semester 
of the senior year. Admission notifica- 
tion will be made to these students in 
the spring. 




"Through the Years" is now a 
regular section of The Maryland 
Magazine. Insofar as possible cur- 
rent information concerning our 
Alumni will be contained in these col- 
umns. Those who served for many 
years as our school and college editors 
will still be providing items for this 
section. Much news will be gleaned 
from Alumni History Records sub- 
mitted to our members from time to 
time. This section will always wel- 
come notes from our readers giving 
us word on the accomplishments, ac- 
tivities, locations, and personal notes. 
We welcome your reaction and your 
assistance. It is our hope every reader 
will also be a reporter. 



1895-1919 

Dr. Walter Burt Yost, Agr. '86, 
m.d. '94, died on October 13, 1962. 
Dr. Yost led a storybook life of adven- 
ture and service. From cowboy in the 
Montana Territory in 1887 to gradua- 
tion from the University's Medical 
School in 1894 to resident physician at 
the St. Louis Fair in 1904. He continued 
to practice in St. Louis for many years. 
Dr. Yost was 89. 



W. Calvin Chesnut, ll.b. '94, died 
at his home in Baltimore on October 
16, 1962. Judge Chesnut served 31 years 
on the Federal Court in Baltimore. He 
was considered one of the foremost 
Maryland jurists of the Twentieth Cen- 
tury. His judicial philosophy is reflected 
in his own words, "All public office is 
a public trust, the judicial office is even 
more than this. It is a sacred trust." 
Judge Chesnut was 89. 

William J. Lowry, Phar. '96, is now 
retired and living in Baltimore. Among 
his many activities, Mr. Lowry served 
as senior pharmacist at James P. 
Frames & Son in Baltimore. He was 
also the first president of the Pharmacy 
Alumni Association of the University 
of Maryland. 

Dr. Richard Holt Morris, m.d. 
"96, is retired from the practice of med- 
icine. He is living in Everett, Mass. Dr. 
Morris has three children. He is also a 
graduate of the School of Pharmacy, 
Class of 1891. 

Robert E. L. Marshall, ll.b. '97, 
died in October, 1962, at his home in 
Baltimore. Mr. Marshall was the son of 
the military secretary to General Robert 
E. Lee. He was 89. 

Dr. Curtis A. Sheely, d.d.s. '02, is 
still active in the practice of dentistry. 
He and his wife live in Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania. Dr. Sheely's oldest grand- 
daughter, Barbara, graduated from 
Maryland in 1958. 

Dr. Robert Edward L. Strickler, 
d.d.s. '03, retired from the practice of 
dentistry in 1960. He lives in Bridge- 
water, Virginia. 

Thomas B. Mullendore, A&S '04, 
is retired and living in Buffalo, N. Y. 
Mr. Mullendore regularly returns for 
Homecoming at the University. 

(Continued on next page) 




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January-February, 1963 



23 



Dr. Andrew J. Loughnan, m.d. '01, 
died on October 4, 1962. at the Vet- 
erans Administration Hospital at Wood, 
\\ isconsin. Dr. Loughnan practiced 
medicine in Oconomowoc for 43 years. 
He had been retired for two years. He 
was 89. 

Rk HARD H. Halley. ll.b. '05, is re- 
tired and living in Montross, Virginia. 
He was the cashier at what is now the 
Maryland National Bank, and served 
with that institution for forty years. 

Dr. James Stephenson Hopkins, 
D.D.S. '05, died November 18, 1962, at 
Union Memorial Hospital. He had prac- 
ticed dentistry in Bel Air since 1905. 
Dr. Hopkins had received the Univer- 
sity's Distinguished Alumni Award last 
February. He was 78. 

J. J. T. Graham, A&S '06, retired 
from the U. S. Dept. of Agriculture in 
I 954. He also received his m.s. degree 
in chemistry from the University of 
Maryland 1917. He lives in Bowie, 
Maryland. 

Dr. LeRoy G. Sigler, d.d.s. '06, is 
a practicing dentist in Georgetown, 
Maryland. 

Dr. Clarence V. Latimer, m.d. '07, 
is a practicing physician. He has three 
children and lives in Deposit, New York. 

Dr. Richard F. Simmons, d.d.s. '07, 
is a practicing dentist. His family of 
ladies includes one daughter, one grand- 
daughter and one great granddaughter. 
Dr. Simmons lives in Norfolk, Virginia. 

George Roy Mueller, ll.b. '08, 
retired in 1959 as Vice President and 
Trust Officer of the Baltimore National 
Bank. He lives in Baltimore. 

Dr. Ernest V. Nolt, m.d. '08, is 
retired from the practice of medicine. 
He is living in Columbia City, Indiana. 

Carroll A. Warthen, Engr. '08, is 
retired from engineering. One of his 
many accomplishments was the build- 
ing of the George Washington Masonic 
Memorial at Alexandria. Mr. Warthen 
lives in Huntington, Maryland. 

Dr. Lawrence Kolb, m.d. '08, is a 
consultant with the National Institute of 
Mental Health. He served for many 
years as a commissioned officer in the 
U. S. Public Health Service. Dr. Kolb 
lives in Washington, D. C. 

Dr. James A. Hughes, m.d. '09, died 
in Mt. Carmel, Pennsylvania, on No- 
vember 10, 1962. Dr. Hughes is sur- 
vived by his wife. 

Col. Basil D. Spalding, Engr. '09, is 
retired as a career officer in the U. S. 



Army. Col. Spalding lives in Atlanta, 
Georgia. 

William R. Maslin, Engr. '09, is 
retired after 42 years as treasurer of 
the National Process Co. of New York. 
Mr. Maslin lives in Port Chester, New 
York. His son and daughter also at- 
tended the University of Maryland. 

Herschel H. Allen, Engr. '10, is 
the Senior Consulting Engineer with 
the J. E. Greiner Company of Baltimore. 
Mr. Allen lives in Baltimore. He has 
five children. 

Roy M. Birely, Pharm. '10, retired 
from pharmacy in 1956. He was the 
manager of Morgan and Millard Drug 
Store in Roland Park. His son, B. Rob- 
ert Birely, m.d., graduated from the 
University of Maryland in 1951. Mr. 
Birely lives in Baltimore. 

Dr. Morris L. Cahn, m.d. '10, is a 
practicing physician. He lives in Read- 
ing, Pennsylvania. Dr. Cahn has three 
children. 

Dr. Thomas Ray Stanton, Agr. TO, 
died at his home in Hyattsville on No- 
vember 15, 1962. Until his retirement 
in 1951, Dr. Stanton had served with 
the U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. He re- 
ceived his m.s. from the University of 
Maryland in 1921, and was awarded an 
honorary Doctor of Agriculture from 
Iowa State University in 1945. Dr. 
Stanton was 77. 

Dr. Joseph Stomel, m.d. '11, died 
in Los Angeles on September 27, 1962. 

E. R. Burrier, Engr. '12, retired in 
1960. Mr. Burrier was an Electrical In- 
spector and construction engineer. He 
lives in Scranton, Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Charles Jacob Greenstein, 
m.d. '12, is a practicing physician spe- 
cializing in eye, ear, nose and throat. 
He lives in New Britain, Connecticut. 
Dr. Greenstein has two daughters. 

Dr. Manuel Janer, m.d. '12, is en- 
gaged in the general practice of medi- 
cine. He practiced in Puerto Rico until 
1946. He now lives in New York. 

Henry E. Sencindiver, ll.b. '12, is 
a retired purchasing agent. Mr. Sencin- 
diver lives in Wauchula, Florida. 

Dr. Philip Jenifer Bean, m.d. '13, 
is a practicing physician. He lives in 
Great Mills, Maryland. Dr. Bean has 
four children. 

Charles M. White, Engr. '13, is 
honorary chairman of the board of Re- 
public Steel Corporation. Mr. White 
joined Republic Steel in 1930 and be- 
came its president in 1945. In August 



1956 he was elected chairman of the 
board, and was elected honorary chair- 
man upon his retirement in 1960. Mr. 
and Mrs. White live in Shaker Heights, 
Ohio. They have one daughter. 

Dr. Joseph C. Carvalho, d.d.s. '14, 
is retired from the practice of dentistry. 
Dr. Carvalho has been the mainstay of 
the Maryland Dental Alumni in New 
England. He lives in Fall River, Massa- 
chusetts. He has four children. 

Dr. Paisley Fields, d.d.s. '13, is re- 
tired from dentistry, but still has some 
farming interests to keep him occupied. 
Dr. Fields lives in Fairmont, North 
Carolina. 

Dr. J. Ben Robinson, d.d.s. '14, is 
Dean Emeritus of the School of Den- 
tistry of the University of Maryland. He 
served as dean from 1924 to 1953. He 
then served as the dean of West Virginia 
University's School of Dentistry until 
1958. Dr. Robinson now lives in Luth- 
erville, Maryland. 

Lloyd R. Rogers, Engr. '14, is a re- 
tired engineer. Mr. Rogers lives in Bal- 
timore. He has two children. 

Henry Hooper Waters, ll.b. '15, 
is retired, but maintains some part time 
law practice. Mr. Waters was affiliated 
for many years with the Baltimore 
Transit Company. Until 1961 he was 
a Trust Officer for the Maryland Na- 
tional Bank. He is living in Baltimore 
and has three children. 

Dr. Bartus T. Baggott, m.d. '16, is 
a practicing physician. Until 1959 he 
was a Consultant Lung Specialist for 
several Maryland counties. Dr. Baggott 
lives in Baltimore. 

John C. Sterling, Engr. '16, retired 
in 1961 after 45 years with the Newport 
News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Com- 
pany. For 33 years he had been a super- 
intendent. Mr. Sterling has four children 
and lives in Newport News, Virginia. 

Hooper S. Miles, ll.b. '16, is Chair- 
man of the Board of the Maryland Na- 
tional Bank. Mr. Miles has been Treas- 
urer of the State of Maryland since 
1935. He lives in Baltimore and has two 
daughters. 

Kenneth Grace, Agr. '16, retired 
in 1956. Before that time he had worked 
for the Hibernia Bank and Trust Com- 
pany and the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture. Mr. Grace lives in Easton, 
Maryland. 

Godfrey Child, ll.b. '17, is Asso- 
ciate Judge of the First Judicial Circuit 
of Maryland. Judge Child has also been 




24 



The Maryland Magazine 



State's Attorney for Worcester County. 
He lives in Pocomoke City, Maryland, 
and has two children. 

Col. Bernard Dubei , Agr. '17, is 
retired from a career in the U. S. Marine 
Corps. He also served as Commandant 
of Cadets at Porter Military Academy 
in 1954. Col. Dubel has one daughter 
and lives in Yemassee, South Carolina. 

Roger Howell, ll.b. '17, is Dean 
Emeritus, University of Maryland 
School of Law. Dean Howell retired 
July 1, 1962, after 35 years of service 
to the University of Maryland and the 
State. He lives in Baltimore and has 
four children. 

William M. Kishpaugh, Agr. '17, 
has been elected to the Board of Trus- 
tees of The Experiment in International 
Living in Putney, Vermont. The Kish- 
paughs have five children, and the 
much-traveled family has recently re- 
turned from their third round-the-world 
trip. 

Dr. Zachariah R. Morgan, m.d. '18, 
is a practicing doctor of internal med- 
icine. He is living in Baltimore. 

Henry Beale Rollins, ll.b. '19, is 
the Senior Partner of Rollins, Smalkin, 
Weston and Andrew. He is also Chair- 
man of the Board of Johnson Motor 
Lines, Inc. Mr. Rollins lives in Balti- 
more. 

H. S. Berlin, Engr. '19, died recent- 
ly from a sudden heart attack at his 
home in La Marque, Texas. He is sur- 
vived by his wife, Mrs. Mildred Berlin. 

James W. Stevens, Agr. '19, is the 
owner of Stevens Brothers, Produce 
Commission Merchants. Mr. Stevens 
lives in Baltimore, and for many years 
he has served on the University of 
Maryland Alumni Council. 



1920-1929 

Theodore L. Bissell, Agr. '20, is an 
Extension Entomologist with the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Mr. Bissell has also 
served as an entomologist in Hawaii 
and Georgia. He has three children and 
lives in University Park, Maryland. 

Dr. Claud C. Burton, m.d. '20, is 
the Chief of Surgical Service at the 
Veterans Administration Hospital in 
Lake City, Florida. Dr. Burton has 
three children. His son, Philip, is also 
a doctor. 

Dr. Louis C. Dobihal, m.d. '20, is a 
practicing physician. Dr. Dobihal has 
two daughters and lives in Baltimore. 

Dr. E. Paul Knotts, m.d. '20, died 
at his home in Denton, Maryland, on 
November 3, 1962. Dr. Knotts began 
his practice in Denton in 1924 and be- 
came one of Maryland's outstanding 
physicians. He served on the Board of 
Regents of the University of Maryland 
from 1942 to 1953. He was 67. 



Harriet Willette Bland, Bduc 

'21. has retired after more than 38 years 
as a teacher of Home Economics. Miss 
Miami lives in Sparks, Maryland. 

Dr. Carl F. Benson, m.d. '21, is a 
practicing physician in Baltimore. Dr. 
Benson has three children. His son. 
John, is also a doctor. 

Austin Diggs, b.p.a. '21. is a partner 
in Curtis Diggs, Estate Planning and 
Tax Analysis. Mr. Diggs lives in Balti- 
more. He has one daughter. 




SAY YES 
ID THE NEW 

MARCH 
OF DIMES 



BIRTH DEFECTS • ARTHRITIS 



Dr. Frederick R. Darkis, A&S '22, 
is Director of Research for Liggett & 
Myers Tobacco Co. of Durham, North 
Carolina. Dr. Darkis has been awarded 
the 1962 Southern Chemist Award in 
recognition of his distinguished research 
in tobacco chemistry. Dr. Darkis re- 
ceived his ph.d. in 1928. 

Edward L. Browne, Agr. '22, is the 
Owner and Managing Director of Pom- 
pano Beach Travel Service. Mr. Browne 
lives in Pompano Beach, Florida. 

Charles E. Darnall, Engr. '22, is 
a retired engineer. He has been a Civil, 
Construction and Sanitary Engineer. In 
addition to Mechanical Engineering in 
1922, Mr. Darnall earned a degree in 
Civil Engineering in 1928. 

Dr. William J. Fulton, m.d. '22, is 
retired from the practice of medicine. 
He was the Medical Director of Gen- 



ci.ii Motors Central Office in Detroit 
until ims'> Dr. 1 ulton has three children 
and lives m Queenstown, Maryland. 

J. I n\\ \kii Hi RROI i.iis |r \,\s 

died on Septembei 13, 19( 

J AMI S II. II \KI OW, III. II s '23, 

Engr. '33, was appointed Vice Presi- 
dent, I ngineering and Research, Phila 
delphia I lectric ( ompanj in September, 
1962. He hail previously been < hiel 

Engineer. Mr. Harlow lives with his 

wile in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania. 

Dr. I . R. Bow i us. m.d. '2 ^. is in the 
general practice ol medicine. Dr. Bow- 
ers has three children and lives in 
Bristol, Tennessee. 

C. W. Engi and. Agr. '23. is the Pres- 
ident and Director ol The C. W. I mi- 
land Laboratories ol Frederick, Mary- 
land, and Washington. D. C. Mr. 

England was a professor ot Dairy 
Manufacturing at the University from 
1933 to 1944. His daughter graduated 
from Maryland in 1954. He lives in 
Silver Spring, Maryland. 

W. C. Alford, D.D.S. '24. is a prac- 
ticing dentist in Knowille. Tennessee. 
Dr. Alford has one daughter. 

Charles E. Prince, Agr. '24, is re- 
tired after 38 years with the U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture. Mr. Prince has 
two children. He lives in Seattle, Wash- 
ington. 

Jeremiah D. Shea, i i .B. '24. is an 
attorney at law. Mr. Shea lives in 
Hamden, Connecticut. 

Wirt D. Barti et t. Engr. '25. is the 
owner of Wirt D. Bartlett. Engineering 
& Surveying and a partner in the Bartlett 
Howe Company. Mr. Bartlett has two 
children and lives in Centreville. Mary- 
land. 

Minnie M. Hill. A&S '25. is the 
Assistant Executive Director of the 
Alexander Graham Bell Association for 
the Deaf. Miss Hill lives in Washington. 
D. C. 

Addison E. Hook. Engr. '25. is a 
self-employed Civil Engineer. Mr. Hook 
has two children. He lives in Knoxville. 
Tennessee. 

Theodore R. McKeldin, ll.b. '25. 
is an attorney at law in Baltimore. Mary- 
land. Mr. McKeldin served as Mayor 
of Baltimore from 1943 to 1947. and as 
Governor of Maryland from 1951 to 
1959. He has two 'children. 

Arthur E. Bonnet, Engr. '26. is a 
Project Manager for the Bureau o\ 
Yards and Docks of the Department of 
Navy. Mr. Bonnett has two children and 
seven grandchildren. He lives in Oakton, 
Virginia. 

Jean H. Brayton. Engr. '26, is the 
Municipal Deputy Town Engineer in 
Huntington. New York. Mr. Brayton 
has three daughters. 

Tom A. Browne, A&S '26. is an at- 
torney at law. Mr. Browne and his wife 
live in Waupaca. Wisconsin. 

(Continued on next page) 



January-February, 1963 



25 




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A. H. Clark, A&S '26, is a Staff 
Supervisor with the C.&P. Telephone 
Company of West Virginia. Mr. Clark 
has two children. He lives in Charleston, 
West Virginia. 

Miel D. Burgee, Educ. '27, is the 
Headmaster at the Charlotte Hall Mil- 
itary Academy. Mr. and Mrs. Burgee 
live in Charlotte Hall, Maryland. 

Helen Beyerle Habich, H.Ec. '27, 
is a homemaker living in Mt. Lakes, 
New Jersey. Mrs. Habich has been a 
nutritionist and Home Ec teacher. Her 
two daughters also attend the University 
of Maryland. 

Mylo S. Downey, Agr. '27, is the 
Director of the Division of 4-H Pro- 
grams, Federal Extension Service of the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. Mr. 
Downey has two sons and lives in Col- 
lege Park, Maryland. He is currently 
serving on the Alumni Council of the 
University of Maryland Alumni Asso- 
ciation. 

Mrs. Gladys Miller Eaton, H.Ec. 
'27, is the Supervisor of the School 
Lunch Program of Allegany County. 
Mrs. Eaton earned her m.ed. from Penn 
State. She has two daughters and lives 
in Westernport, Maryland. 

L. P. Baird, Engr. '28, is the General 
Plant Manager for the C.&P. Tele- 
phone Company of Virginia. Mr. Baird 
has two daughters. He lives in Rich- 
mond, Virginia. 

A. Ward Greenwood, Engr. '28, is 
an Assistant Chief in the Programs 
Branch, Office of Engineering of the 
U. S. Bureau of Public Roads. Mr. 
Greenwood lives in Arlington, Virginia. 

Bernard Friedman, m.d. '28, is a 
practicing physician. Dr. Friedman has 
two children and lives in Brooklyn, New 
York. 

Earle P. Clemson, m.d. '28, is a 
surgeon. Dr. Clemson also earned his 
b.s. in A&S in 1924. He lives in Balti- 
more. 

Elmer F. Corey, d.d.s. '28, is in the 
general practice of dentistry. Dr. Corey 
has two children. His daughter, Patricia 
Ann, graduated from the University in 
1953. Dr. Corey lives in Baltimore. 

Fred B. Linton, jr., BPA '29, died 
October 29, 1962, in Winston-Salem, 
North Carolina. He was Executive Vice 
President of the Chamber of Commerce 
of Winston-Salem. 

Joseph N. Corsello, m.d. '29, is a 
physician in private practice. He is also 
the Medical Director of the Providence 
Tuberculosis League. Dr. Corsello has 
two sons and lives in Providence, Rhode 
Island. 

Robert L. Evans, Engr. '29, is a 
Supervisory Examiner and Patent Ex- 
aminer. Mr. Evans received his law 
degree from George Washington Uni- 
versity in 1933. He has one daughter 
and lives in Arlington, Virginia. 

Bruce R. Billmeyer, A&S '29, died 
on October 7 in a water accident near 
Charlestown, Maryland. Mr. Billmeyer 



26 



The Maryland Magazine 



was Assistant Director of Research of 
the Armstrong Cork Company. He was 
an expert in rubber chemistry. 



1930-1939 

Chari.es S. Archer, jr., A&S '30, 
is a lawyer and insurance broker. He is 
the owner of Charles S. Arthur & As- 
sociates. Mr. Archer has three daughters 
and lives in Baltimore, Maryland. 

James Harrison Benner, A&S '30, 
is an insurance broker and attorney. He 
has two daughters and lives in Bethesda. 
Maryland. Mr. Benner received his law 
degree from George Washington Uni- 
versity in 1943. 

R. Duncan Clark, A&S '30, is an 
attorney at law. Mr. Clark lives in 
Chevy Chase, Maryland, and has two 
sons. He received his law degree from 
Harvard in 1933. 

Col. James D. DeMarr, Engr. '30, 
is a career officer in the U. S. Army. He 
is a Signal Officer with the First Army. 
Col. DeMarr has four sons and lives 
in New York. 

Maj. Gen. and Mrs. Joseph D. Cal- 
dara, A&S '31, H.Ec. '34, are with the 
U. S. Air Force and an A. P.O. mailing 
address. Mrs. Caldara is the former 
Christine Finzel. 

Creston E. Funk, Engr. '31, is a 
Supervising Engineer with the D.C. 
Highway Department. Mr. Funk lives in 
Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Page Covington Jett, m.d. '31, 
is a physician living in Prince Frederick, 
Maryland. Dr. Jett has two children. 

Reuben Hoffman, m.d. '31, is a 
practicing physician. Dr. Hoffman has 
two sons and lives in Baltimore. 

Mrs. Ethel Jean Lamond Burris, 
H.Ec. '32, is a housewife. Mrs. Burris is 
the former Ethel Jean Lamond. She 
lives in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware. 

George T. Grosshans, d.d.s. '32, is 
a practicing dentist specializing in ortho- 
dontics. Dr. Grosshans has four children 
and lives in Fairfield, Conn. 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur B. Hersberg- 
er, A&S '32, ph.d. '36; Educ. '37, are 
living in Radnor, Pennsylvania. Mrs. 
Hersberger is the former Lucille Stin- 
nett. Dr. Hersberger is the Director, Vice 
President and General Manager of 
Marketing for The Atlantic Refimng 
Company. The Hersbergers have two 
children. 

Mrs. Minna Cannon Wilson, A&S 
'32, died October 19, 1962, at George 
Washington University Hospital after a 
brief illness. Mrs. Wilson was very active 
in the Episcopal Church and for years 
served as an assistant registrar in Fair- 
fax County. Mrs. Wilson leaves her 
husband and four children. 

Harold E. Crowther, A&S '33, is 
the Assistant Director of the Bureau of 
Commercial Fisheries of the U. S. De- 

(Continued on next page) 



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MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



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Enriched Bread 

IT'S DELICIOUS 

SALISBURY. MARYLAND 



Albert F. Goetze, Inc. 

CHOICER MEATS 

Baltimore, MrJ 




Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltlmor. 24, Md. 



J. McKenny Willis & Son, Inc. 



GRAIN 

FEED 

SEED 



EASTON, MD. 
Phone TA 2-3000 







THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 








MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 








1020 WEST PRATT STREET 






Phone MUlberry 


5-6070 Baltimore 23, 


Md. 



January-February, 1963 



27 



I & YOUR SAVINGS r O\ 



INSURED 



^V Sio.ooo ^; 



SURE SIGN OF SAFETY 

This emblem at Vermont 
Federal means your savings 
are insured by an agency 
of the U. S. Govt. They also 
earn high dividends. Open 
your account here now! 

VERMONT 
FE DERAL 
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and toon Associaf/on 

Baltimore at Charles, SA. 7-0250 
Norihwood Shopping Center, TU. 9-5551 



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LA 3-1552 



ARISTOCRAT 

LINEN SUPPLY CO., INC. 

614-620 MOSHER STREET 
BALTIMORE 17, MARYLAND 

A Complete Linen Rental Service 
for all commercial establishments 

COATS 

APRONS 

UNIFORMS 

TOWELS 

TABLE LINEN 

WHY BUY? — WE SUPPLY! 



KIDUIELI & KIDUIEL1, Inc. 

Plastering - Dry Wall 

Insulation 

Acoustical and Bricklaying 

BOX 266 COLLEGE PARK 

GR 4-4500 MD. 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



The 

Washington Wholesale 
Drug Exchange, Inc. 

Retail Druggist 

Owned Wholesale 
Drug House 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



American Disinfectant Co. 

Pesf Control Service And Products 

928 EYE STREET. N.W. 
Washington 1, D. C. NAtional 8-6478 



ALCAZAR 

CATHEDRAL and MADISON STS. 

Phone VErnon 7-8400 

Baltimore, Md. 




BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 

"feecome Quality Conddoud-" 

PLANT: 621-27 G STREET, N.W. REpubllc 7-5400 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVILLE, MD. WArfUld 7-0800 



partment of the Interior. Mr. Crowther 
received his M.S. from the University in 
1935. He has one daughter and lives in 
Hyattsville, Maryland. 

Dr. Albert C. Cook, d.d.s. '33, is a 
practicing dentist. He lives in Cumber- 
land, Maryland. Dr. Cook's two children 
have both attended the University. 

Dr. Lauriston L. Keown, m.d. '33, 
is a practicing physician. Dr. Keown has 
three children and lives in Baltimore. 

George L. Hockensmith, Engr. '33, 
has been appointed Manager of Indus- 
trial and Public Relations of the Syra- 
cuse plant of Allied Chemicals Solvay 
Process Division. Mr. Hockensmith is 
also on the executive committee of the 
Personnel Management Council of the 
Manufacturers Association of Syracuse. 

J. William Steiner, Engr. '34, has 
recently been appointed President and 
General Manager of the Art Metal 
Lighting Division of the Wakefield 
Corporation. Mr. Steiner, his wife and 
two children are living in Cleveland. 
He received his M.S. from M.I.T. in 
1938. 

Dr. Alfred E. Carhart, d.d.s. '34, 
is a practicing dentist. Dr. Carhart and 
his wife live in Cliffside Park, New 
Jersey. 

Dr. D. Delmas Caples, m.d. '34, is 
a practicing physician. Dr. Caples has 
four children and lives in Reisterstown, 
Maryland. 

Richard W. Ockershausen, Engr. 
'34, is with Allied Chemical's General 
Chemical Division. He has been ap- 
pointed to the Board of Governors of 
the Water and Sewage Works Man- 
ufacturers Association. Mr. Ockers- 
hausen lives in Bergenfield, New Jersey. 

Dr. Dominic Thomas Battaglia, 
m.d. '35, is a surgeon. Dr. Battalgia has 
four children. He lives in Baltimore. 

Harold J. Burns, Engr. '35, is the 
Superintendent of the Service Depart- 
ment of the Washington Gas Light Com- 
pany. Mr. Burns has four chlidren. He 
lives in Washington, D. C. 

Laurence R. Bower, Agr. '35, is a 
practicing osteopathic physician. He has 
three children and lives in Silver Spring, 
Maryland. 

Ridgeley B. Bond, A&S '35, is em- 
ployed as a Chief Chemist. Mr. Bond 
has two children. His daughter, Cas- 
sandra, is now attending the University 
of Maryland. The Bonds live in Catons- 
ville, Maryland. 

Dr. and Mrs. Nathan Gammon, jr., 
A&S '36, A&S '36, live in Gainesville, 
Florida. Mrs. Gammon is the former 
Dorothy Allen. Dr. Gammon is a soil 
chemist and Professor at the University 
of Florida. The Gammons have two 
children. 

Charles L. Cogswell, A&S '36, is 
Manager of the Government Division of 
General American Transportation Cor- 
poration. Mr. Cogswell has three chil- 
dren and lives in Oakton, Virginia. 



2H 



The Maryland Magazine 



Dr. Reid L. Beers, m.d. '36, died 
on October 9, 1962. Dr. Beers lived in 
Glendale, California. 

Mrs. Bernice Sugar Fleishman, 
Educ. '37, is the owner-manager of a 
ladies' shop as well as being a house- 
wife. Mrs. Fleishman has three children. 
She lives in Lumberton, North Carolina. 

Mathews J. Haspert, Engr. '37, 
lives in Towson, Maryland. Mr. Has- 
pert is the Chief of the Contracts Divi- 
sion of Baltimore County. He has one 
son. 

Dr. Gilbert E. Teal, Engr. '37, has 
been elected president of Public Service 
Research, Inc., a subsidiary of Dunlap 
and Associates, Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Teal 
and their two children live in Newton, 
Connecticut. He holds doctorate degrees 
in both education and engineering sci- 
ence from New York University. 

Charles W. Felton, Jr., Engr. '37, 
has been appointed superintendent of 
the blast furnace department of Beth- 
lehem Steel Company's Lackawanna 
Plant. 

Col. John F. Wolfe, BPA '38, is 
serving as the Staff Judge Advocate in 
Headquarters, U. S. Army, Tyukyu 
Islands, Okinawa. His wife, Lois, is 
with him in Okinawa. 

G. Clinton Brookhart, Engr. '38, 
is a partner in the firm of Brookhart & 
Tyo, Consulting Engineers. Mrs. Brook- 
hart, the former Dorothy Roop, at- 
tended Maryland from 1938 to 1940. 
They have four children and live in 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Dorothy Coleman Fenzel, 
Nurs. '38, is a Civil Service Staff Nurse. 
Mrs. Fenzel served in the Air Force 
Nurse Corps for eight years. She has a 
son and lives in Yuma, Arizona. 

Abram Z. Gottwals, Agr. '38, is 
the recently appointed Assistant Vice 
President of the Salisbury National 
Bank. Mr. Gottwals will be in charge of 
agricultural relations. He is also cur- 
rently serving on the Alumni Council 
of the University of Maryland. 

Jack Feldman, Pharm. '39, is a 
pharmacist and owner of Mid-Way 
Drugs. Mr. Feldman lives in Chevy 
Chase, Maryland. He has two children. 
His son, Neil, is a junior at the Univer- 
sity. 

Dr. Elizabeth Bess Cannon, m.d. 
'39, is a clinician for Alameda County 
and Berkeley, California, Health Depart- 
ments. Dr. Cannon is also married to a 
physician. The Cannons have five 
children and live in Berkeley, California. 

Marguerite Wilson Foster, Nurs. 
'39, is an Associate Director of Nursing. 
Miss Foster lives in Timonium, Mary- 
land. She served as a Captain in the 
Army Nurse Corps. 

E. Rumsey Anthony, Jr., A&S '39, 
died of an apparent heart attack at 
Suburban Hospital in Bethesda on No- 
vember 18, 1962. Mr. Anthony was the 
Chief of the Policy Office of the Air 
Force Intelligence Center. He was 44. 
(Continued on next page) 



RESIDENTIAL IRON WORK 




PORCH & TERRACE HAND 

RAILINGS • BALCONIES 

GATES • COLUMNS 

TRELLIAGE 

INTERIOR STAIR 

RAILINGS 
For Estimate Call 

LA 6-1240 
Washington, D. C. 



Sefauna dtudentd. and 
aUunni a^ the 

Maryland 

lUSTinE 

Glieusxdet 
OldlmaLile 

Pkil luAtine . . . 
head frj; hoik companies 

Baltimore Ave. on Route 1 
Hyattsville, Md. 
WArfield 7-7200 



TASTE THE DIFFERENCE 
QUALITY MAKES! 



1-MQUALITY^-W 



ALL MEAT FRANKS 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to whole- 
some, flavorful perfection. Be 
sure to ask for Esskay Franks — 
they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Building. 
SCHLUDERBERG-KURDLE CO., INC. 



VICTOR 

CUSHWA 

& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Sales Representatives in 
Principal Eastern Cities 



Subscribe to MARYLAND Magazine 



ARUNDEL FEDERAL 

Savings and Loan Association 

PATAPSCO AVE. & FOURTH ST. 



Baltimore 25, Md. 




WHERE YOU BORROW 
Does MAKE A DIFFERENCE 

Savings accounts insured up 

to $10,000— Federal Sovings 4 

toon Insurance Corporation 

355-9300 



January-February, J 963 



29 



SALES 




SERVICE 



Specialists in Residential and 
Commercial Air Conditioning 

Room Coolers - Package Units - Year Round Furnaces 

"Year Round Comfort in Your Home and Office" 

CALL US FOR THE NAME OF YOUR NEAREST DEALER 

YORK WHOLESALERS, Inc. 



(Wholesale Distributor) 
501 - 15th ST., SOUTH 



OTis 4-3700 



Arlington, Va. 



The gathering place for 
Marylanders of Good Taste 




I DUKE ZEIBERT'S 3 

RESTAURANT 
1722 L Street 

(Two doors west of Conn. Ave.) 

STerling 3-1730 

Open 'ill Midnight— Sunday 'til 10 p.m. 



King Bros., Inc 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SAratoga 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



Buy U. S. Savings Bonds 
Every Payday 

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PHONE 474-5100 



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NORMAN MO TOR C OMPANY. Inc. 

SALES 4f % SERVICE 



8315 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



1940-1949 

Herman Russell Knust, Engr. '40, 
Assistant General Manager of the Beth- 
lehem Steel Company, Sparrows Point, 
has been elected president of the As- 
sociation of Iron and Steel Engineers 
for 1963. 

Harry I. Cohen, Pharm. '40, is a 
pharmacist. Mr. Cohen and his wife, 
Lucille, have two children. They live in 
Fairfax, Virginia. 

Dr. Lester H. Caplan, m.d. '40, is 
a practicing pediatrician and Instructor 
of Pediatrics at the University of Mary- 
land School of Medicine. Dr. Caplan has 
two children and lives in Lutherville, 
Maryland. 

Charles R. Disharoon, BPA '40, is 
a partner in the insurance brokerage 
firm, Cook, Disharoon and Greathouse. 
Mr. Disharoon traveled 6000 miles to 
return for Homecoming in 1961. He 
lives in Lafayette, California. The 
Disharoons have three children. 

Major Thelma J. Bjorkland, Nurs. 
'41, is a U. S. Air Force Nurse. Mrs. 
Bjorkland has been in the service since 
1943. Her address is Forbes Air Force 
Base in Kansas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Judson H. Bell, 
Educ. '41, A&S '41, have three children 
and live in College Park, Maryland. Mr. 
Bell is with the Secretariat Office of the 
Department of State. 

Dr. Jerome S. Cullen, d.d.s. '41, 
is a dentist specializing in orthodontics. 
Dr. Cullen and his wife, Carmen, have 
two children. They live in Baltimore. 

Albert J. Carry, BPA '42, is a Cer- 
tified Public Accountant and a partner 
in Carry and Carry. Mr. Carry lives in 
Washington, D. C. The Carrys have 
four children. 

Dr. John J. Meli, m.d. '42, is a gen- 
eral surgeon in private practice. Dr. 
Meli and his wife, Edith, live in Naples, 
Florida. 

Charles J. Eckenrode, Educ. '42, is 
the Superintendent of Education and 
Vocational Training for the U. S. Bur- 
eau of Prisons in Washington, D. C. 
Mr. Eckenrode lives in University Park, 
Maryland. He has two children. His 
son, Charles, Jr., is a student at the 
University. 

Mrs. Ruth Lee Thompson Clarke, 
H.Ec. '42, is a housewife living in Chevy 
Chase, Maryland. Mrs. Clarke has four 
children. She is currently serving on the 
Alumni Council of the University of 
Maryland Alumni Association. 

Dr. William Massie Tunstall, Jr., 
d.d.s. '43, died unexpectedly at his home 
in Roseland. 

Sidney T. Efross, A&S '43, is a 
painting contractor living in Garrett 
Park, Maryland. He has two children. 
Mr. Efross earned his m.a. degree from 
Columbia in 1947. 

William M. Eareckson, III. A&S 
'43, is a Senior Research Chemist with 



30 



The Maryland Magazine 



IN the MARYLAND SEGMENT 

of GREATER WASHINGTON 

IT'S THE 



Suburban 



Trust 



Company 



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Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
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Complete secretarial training 

9 months 

Special and pre-college courses 

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WASHINGTON. D. C. 



the Textile Fibers Department ol Du 
Pont. Dr. Eareckson received his ph.d. 

from the University in 1950. He has 
four children and lives in Richmond, 

Virginia. 

Dr. R. Adams COWLEV, md. '44. is 
a Professor of I horacic and Cardio- 
vascular Surgery. Dr. Crowley has one 
daughter and lives in Baltimore. 

Dk. Charles Epstein, d.d.s. '44, is 
a practicing dentist. He and his wife, 
Ruth, have two daughters and live in 
Baltimore. 

Dwight O. Fearnow, Engr. '44. is a 
Senior Helicopter Design Specialist with 
Lockheed in California. He and his wife 
live in North Hollywood, California. 

Lisle H. Senser, Jr., Engr. '44, is a 
Mechanical Engineer, Corps of Engi- 
neers, Ballistics Missile Construction 
Office, Minuteman Directorate, Engi- 
neering Branch. He and his wife, Janice, 
live in Torrance, California. They have 
four children. 

Dr. Henry F. Maguire, m.d. '45, is 
a physician specializing in Ob-Ciyn. He 
and his wife, Katharine, live in San 
Diego, California. 

Mrs. Sonja Johnson Maas, Educ. 
'45, is a core teacher in Junior High 
School. Mrs. Maas has three sons and 
lives in Owensboro, Kentucky. 

Mrs. Muriel Maier Selph. A&S 
'45, is the Executive Secretary and 
Treasurer of Maryland Independent 
Publishing Company, Inc., a Charles 
County newspaper. Mrs. Selph has two 
daughters and lives in Mt. Victoria, 
Maryland. 

William E. Scull, Jr., Engr. '45, 
is a Project Engineer for RCA Missile 
and Surface Radar Division at Kwaja- 
lein in the Marshall Islands. Mr. Scull 
has two children, and his home is in 
Haddonfleld, New Jersey. 

Dr. Harold V. Cano, m.d. '46, is a 
practicing physician. Dr. Cano has five 
children and lives in Spotswood, New 
Jersey. He received his b.s. degree from 
the University in 1943. 

Jacqueline Nita Arps, H.Ec. '46, is 
the Office and Sales Manager for a color 
slide firm. Miss Arps lives in Alex- 
andria, Virginia. 

Dr. Charles J. Bove, Jr., d.d.s. '46, 
is a practicing dentist. He has four 
children and one due in December. Dr. 
Bove lives in Annapolis. 

Dr. J. Paulson Hunter, m.s. '46, is 
a practicing physician and surgeon. Dr. 
Hunter has eight children. His home is 
in Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Dr. Duane L. Greenfield, m.d. '46. 
is a physician specializing in urology. 
Dr. Greenfield has five children and 
lives in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. 

Sylvia Grace Cary, A&S '47, is a 
Medical Bacteriologist at Walter Reed 
Army Medical Center in Washington, 
D. C. Miss Cary lives in Hyattsville, 
Maryland. She received her m.s. degree 
from the University in 1958. 

(Continued on next page) 



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FOR SAVERS 




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SALES • INSURANCE 
Near University of Maryland 

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January-February, J 963 



31 




MASSEY- FERGUSON, INC 

BALTIMORE BRANCH 

YORK & TIMONIUM ROADS 
TIMONIUM, MARYLAND 



Look For our Local Dealer in Your Community 



McLeod 6c Romborg 

Stone Co., Inc. 

— •— 

CUT STONE 

— •— 
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(2/ erring 








THE PUBLIC OVER ONE HUNDRED YEARS ^g/ 


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26th and SISSON STREETS 








BALTIMORE 11, MD. 








Phone BElmont 5-8600 



Arthur T. Corey, Agr. '47, is a 
Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
at Colorado State University. Dr. Corey 
received his ph.d. degree from Rutgers 
University in 1952. He has two sons and 
lives in Ft. Collins, Colorado. 

Dr. Charles W. Cox, d.d.s. '47, is 
a practicing dentist. Dr. Cox lives in 
Morgantown, West Virginia. He has 
one son. 

Howard L. Cromwell, Engr. '47, 
is Plant Manager of the Dixie Chemical 
Company. Mr. Cromwell has a daughter 
and lives in Houston, Texas. 

Sheldon B. Akers, Engr. '48, of the 
General Electric Company is the com- 
puter engineer who guided the develop- 
ment of the new G.E. computer BIPAD 
11. BIPAD II was developed to meet 
the extreme reliability needs of the space 
age. It repairs itself when breakdown 
occurs and keeps on giving answers 
without delay. An Electrical Engineer- 
ing grad, Mr. Akers also received his 
M.S. from the University of Maryland 
in Math in 1952. He started with Gen- 
eral Electric in 1956. 

George W. Couch, Jr., A&S '48, is 
Sales Manager for Anheuser Busch, Inc. 
Mr. Couch has three sons. His home is 
in St. Louis, Missouri. 

Rex S. Fox, Agr. '48, is the Executive 
Vice President of The Fox Company. 
Mr. Fox and his wife, Carol, live in 
Vineland, New Jersey. They have two 
children. 

William H. Heritage, Agr. '48, is 
an Extension Associate in Soils at Rut- 
gers University. Mr. Heritage has four 
children. He lives in Magnolia, New 
Jersey. 

Richard L. Elliott, Jr., Engr. '49, 
is the Chief Electrical Engineer for 
Maryland Shipbuilding and Dry Dock 
Company. Mr. Elliott and his wife. 
Patricia, live in Baltimore. 

William D. Fazenbaker, ll.b. '49, 
is an attorney at law. He and his wife, 
Doris, live in Flint, Michigan. 

Robert C. Hainsworth, BPA '49, 
is a Senior Bank Examiner for the Fed- 
eral Deposit Insurance Company. Mr. 
Hainsworth has three children. He lives 
in Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Donald C. Joseph, Educ. '49, is a 
Sales Representative for C. H. Mussel- 
man Company. Mr. Joseph and his wife, 
Ruth, live in Silver Spring, Maryland. 



1950-1959 

Andrew L. Haislip, Jr., BPA '50, 
is an attorney in the law firm of Hayes, 
Fitzgerald, Wanner, Haislip & Mac- 
Hale. He has two children. Mr. Haislip 
lives in Hyattsville, Maryland. 

Kenneth R. Hankin, A&S '50, is a 
practicing podiatrist in Baltimore. He 
has two daughters. 

William H. Kinnear, P.E. '50, is a 
truck tire representative for the B. F. 



32 



The Maryland Magazine 



Goodrich Company. Mr. Kinncar has 
three children. His home is in Baltimore. 

Paul A. Pumpian, Phar. '50, LL.B. 
'53, is the Secretary of the Wisconsin 
State Board of Pharmacy. He is in 
charge of administering the State's 
Drug and Narcotic Laws. Mr. Pumpian 
recently participated in the White House 
Conference on Narcotic and Drug 
Abuse. 

Arlie P. Baker, Jr., BPA '51, is a 
U. S. Government Personnel Adminis- 
trator, Wage & Classification Officer. 
Naval Ordnance Laboratory in Silver 
Spring, Maryland. Mr. Baker received 
his m.a. degree from George Washing- 
ton University in 1954. He has two chil- 
dren and lives in Kensington, Mary- 
land. 

William J. Biehl, Jr., BPA '51, has 
joined Formica Corporation's district 
sales office in Miami. Mr. Biehl recently 
completed a sales training program at 
Formica's headquarters in Cincinnati. 

William E. Rinehardt, P.E. '51, has 
been appointed assistant claim superin- 
tendent in the Eastern Region office of 
the State Farm Mutual Automobile In- 
surance Company. Mr. Rinehardt lives 
in Charlottesville, Virginia, with his 
wife and two children. 

Earle R. Marden, Jr.. Engr. '51, 
has joined the legal staff of Dorr-Oliver 
Incorporated at the company's interna- 
tional headquarters in Stamford, Conn. 
Mr. Marden received his law degree 
from George Washington University in 
1957. Mr. and Mrs. Marden and two 
sons live in Darien, Connecticut. 

Capt. Nicholas C. Nicholas, A&S 
'52, is an officer in the U. S. Air Force. 
Capt. Nicholas has two daughters. He 
lives in Fort Worth, Texas. 

Ivan B. Oshrine, A&S '52, is a Med- 
ical Representative and Territory Man- 
ager. He has two children, and his home 
is in Baltimore. 

John Alan Richard, Engr. '52, is an 
Assistant Division Engineer in the Dis- 
trict of Columbia Division of the U. S. 
Bureau of Public Roads. He has four 
children and his home is in Silver 
Spring, Maryland. 

James L. Tobin, A&S '52, ll.b. '57, 
has been appointed as subcontract ad- 
ministrator by Electro-Mechanical Re- 
search, Inc. Mr. Tobin's duties are con- 
cerned with subcontract administration 
for Project Dyna-Soar, the USAF-NASA 
manned space glider. 

Arthur Clarence Sampson, Jr., 
BPA '53, is a financial accountant. Mr. 
Sampson lives in Hyattsville, Maryland. 
He has three children. 

Dr. Henry Robert Satzger, d.d.s. 
'53, is a practicing dentist. He has one 
son. Dr. Satzger and his wife, Florence, 
live in Dover, New Jersey. 

John Hunter Shoemake, BPA '53, 
is Accounting Manager of Revenue Ac- 
counting Machine Section of the C. & 
P. Telephone Company. Mr. Shoemake 

(Continued on next page) 



ml 




V '*«*■ : ' : ::: ' '•" II! II II 111 



aajui'-ir- 



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January-February, 1963 



33 



Student's Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

College Park Md. 




Alumni 
Headquarters for 

• CLASS RINGS 

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• ETCHED GLASSWARE 

• JEWELRY 

• STATIONERY 




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WASHINGTON 21, D.C. 







has four children. His home is in Silver 
Spring, Maryland. 

Dr. Thomas W. Skaggs, m.d. '53, is 
a surgeon in private practice. He is 
also the physician in charge of the 
Emergency Room at Jackson Memorial 
Hospital. Dr. Skaggs has two children. 
He lives in Miami, Florida. 

Claud A. Alsop, BPA '54, recently 
assumed duties as Program Evaluation 
Analyst in the Office of the Controller 
with the U. S. Agency for International 
Development in Washington. Mr. Alsop 
also serves as city councilman of Car- 
rollton, Maryland. He has three chil- 
dren. 

Alice Ann Gates, Educ. '54, is a 
retired teacher. Miss Gates lives in New 
Iberia, Louisiana. She served as an offi- 
cer in the WAC in World War II. 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Guender, 
A&S '54, H.Ec. '54, live in Newtown 
Square, Pennsylvania. Mr. Guender is 
a Project Engineer for the Bell Tele- 
phone Company of Pennsylvania. Mrs. 
Guender is the former Mary Anne 
Evans. The Guenders have three chil- 
dren. 

Capt. and Mrs. Paul J. Hansen, 
Jr., BPA '54, H.Ec. '52, are currently 
living in Jacksonville, Arkansas. Mrs. 
Hansen is the former Elizabeth Mae 
Joseph. Capt Hansen is an Aircrew 
Commander in Strategic Air Command 
bombers. The Hansens have one daugh- 
ter. 

Ruth Stanley Kuntz, Educ. '55, 
married J. Kenneth Kuntz on July 7, 
1962. Mr. Kuntz is a Methodist min- 
ister. They are living in New York City 
while Mr. Kuntz works on his doctor's 
thesis. 

James J. Lohr, BPA '55, is a Dealer 
Salesman for the Humble Oil and Re- 
fining Company. Mr. Lohr has three 
sons. The latest, William Scott, was born 
in October. The Lohrs live in Hyatts- 
ville, Maryland. 

Ronald Fisher McDonald, Jr., 
A&S '55, is an attorney in the law firm 
of Ballman and McDonald. Mr. Mc- 
Donald has three children. He received 
his law degree from George Washington 
University in 1958. The McDonalds live 
in Wheaton, Maryland. 

Mrs. Elsie Virginia Irvine, Educ. 
'56, retired from teaching in June, 1962. 
Mrs. Irvine has one son and her home 
is in Chevy Chase, Maryland. 

Haruko Ishiyama, Agr. '56, is a sec- 
retary in the Bureau of Land Manage- 
ment of the Department of Interior. 
Miss Ishiyama lives in McLean, Vir- 
ginia. 

Gershon Kekst, A&S '56, has re- 
cently been appointed Vice President of 
Ruder & Finn Incorporated, a New 
York public relations firm. Mr. Kekst 
worked in Washington radio and tele- 
vision before joining the firm in 1959. 

Dr. Norman D. Kisamore, d.d.s. 
'56, is a practicing dentist in Baltimore. 



34 



The Maryland Magazine 



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distributed by 
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Dr. and Mrs. Kisamore have three chil- 
dren. He has just published his lirsi 
book . . . on horse racing. 

Virginia Ckonin, A&S '57, m.. A&S 
'60, is working on her doctor's degree 
al Cornell University. 

Jack S. PaREZO, Kngr. '57, has been 
promoted to captain anil is assigned to 
the 966th Airborne Early Warning and 
Control Squadron at McCoy A.F.B. in 
Florida. 

Gerard Henry Schi.imm, Engr. '57. 
is now an Assistant Professor in the De- 
partment of Engineering at the U. S. 
Naval Academy at Annapolis. Mr. 
Schlimm taught in the University's De- 
partment of Mechanical Engineering for 
two years before assuming his new posi- 
tion at the Naval Academy. He has an 
M.S. from Newark College of Engineer- 
ing. 

M. Virginia Stanley Wiggins, Educ. 
'57, married Army Captain Ralph Ci. 
Wiggins. They live in Bethel, Ohio. 

David S. Band, BPA '58, is serving 
as an officer in the USAF and has been 
assigned as Claims and Tax Officer, 
Judge Advocate General's Office, Elgin 
A.F.B. in Florida. He received his i i ,B. 
from George Washington University. 

John Adam Besel, A&S '58, ll.b. 
'60, is with the claim department of 
the State Farm Mutual Insurance Com- 
pany. Mr. Bensel is married to the 
former Jeannette N. McPherson, also a 
Maryland grad. 

Dr. Thomas C. Montie, m.s., A&S 
'58, has been named an Assistant Mem- 
ber of the Research Laboratories of 
Philadelphia's Albert Einstein Medical 
Center. Dr. Montie will serve as an in- 
vestigator in a study into the "Mech- 
anism of Action of Microbial Toxins." 
He received his ph.d. from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland in 1960. Dr. and Mrs. 
Montie have two children. 

Margaret F. Sherwood, m.s., ph.g. 
'58, is spending a year in Peru working 
on Project Hope. Miss Sherwood's home 
is Leetonia, Ohio. 

George W. Townsend, BPA '58. has 
been appointed a brokerage consultant 
at the Youngstown brokerage office of 
Connecticut General Life Insurance 
Company. Mr. and Mrs. Townsend and 
their son live in Youngstown, Ohio. 

Don E. Zieg, Mil.Sci. '58, retired 
from the U. S. Army June 1, 1962, and 
is now Vice President and Public Rela- 
tions Counsel with the Conner Adver- 
tising Agency, Inc., of Denver, Colo- 
rado. 

Walter K. Herr, Engr. '59, is a 
Sales Engineer at the home offices of 
the Trane Company in La Crosse, Wis- 
consin. Mr. Herr recently completed a 
three-year tour of duty as an officer in 
the U. S. Air Force. 

Lt. Nicholas A. Keck, A&S '59, has 
been assigned to a Strategic Air Com- 
mand unit at Lincoln A.F.B., Nebraska. 

(Continued on next page) 



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January-February, 1963 



35 



Regina Eva Sroka. Nurs. '59, is a 
Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics. Miss 
Sroka lives in Baltimore. 

William N. Taylor. Jr.. A&S "59, 
is the Advertising Manager for the 
Orange Review. Mr. Taylor has one 
daughter and his home is in Orange. 
Virginia. 



THE SIXTIES 

George W. Dalley. A&S "60, has 
been assigned to Laos as the Commu- 
nity Development Advisor for the U. S. 
Agency for International Development. 

Joseph F. Metz, Jr., A&S '60, has 
been named acting resident director of 
the Mont Alto campus of Pennsylvania 
State University. Next summer he will 
assume the post of Dean of Student 
Affairs. 

Elliott J. Alpher. A&S *61. is a 
second year student at the Georgetown 
University Dental School. Mr. Alpher 
lives in Takoma Park, Maryland. 

Charles A. Cockey, BPA '61, has 
recently been appointed Director of 
Public Relations at Washington College 
in Chestertown. For the past two years 
Mr. Cockey has been on the public 
relations staff of the Baltimore Com- 
munity Chest-Red Cross United Appeal. 

Dr. Ray E. Hiebert, m.a. '61, ph.d. 
'62, has been appointed Chairman of 
the Department of Journalism and Pub- 
lic Relations at American University. 
Dr. Hiebert has written a book and 
numerous magazine articles. He lives 
with his wife and three children in Ken- 
sington. 

Thomas F. Morrissey, BPA '61, is 
Vice President and Director of Manu- 
facturing and Operations for Utronics, 



Inc. Mr. Morrissey is also serving on 
Governor Rockefeller's Advisory Com- 
mittee on Labor Surplus Areas. 

Dr. John B. Wachtman. Jr., ph.d. 
'61, has been appointed Chief of the 
Physical Properties Section of the Na- 
tional Bureau of Standards, U. S. De- 
partment of Commerce. Dr. Wachtman 
did his undergraduate work at Carnegie 
Institute and received his ph.d. in 
physics from the University of Mary- 
land. 

Major Michael G. Zifcak, U. C. 
'61. has joined the Army ROTC detach- 
ment at the University of Detroit as an 
executive officer. 

Ron Ceccarelli, Engr. '62, is an 
electrical engineer at General Electric's 
Communication Products Department 
at Lynchburg. Virginia. 

Major Joseph B. Hannauer, U. C. 
'62. died August 12, 1962, while on 
vacation in Canada. Major Burroughs, 
retired, was the former post adjutant 
at Fort Meade. He and his wife lived 
in Laurel, Maryland. 

Harold O'Flaherty. A&S '62. is in 
the graduate program of the School of 
Social Welfare of Florida State Uni- 
versity. 

E. Paul Sechrist. Jr.. Agr. '62, has 
entered Louisville Seminary to study for 
the Bachelor of Divinity degree. 

Oscar Ray Vass. Engr. '62, is em- 
ployed by the U. S. Naval Ordnance 
Laboratory at White Oak, Maryland. 
Mr. Vass is with a design group which 
deals with underwater mechanisms. 

Paul Westin, e.e. '62, is Associate 
Engineer with Lockheed Missiles and 
Space Company in Sunnyvale, Califor- 
nia. He is pursuing graduate work part- 
time and expects to have his Master's 
degree by September, 1964. Mr. Westin 
lives in Santa Clara. California. 



Dorothy O. Young 



Dorothy Young, a 1926 graduate, 
recently died of a heart attack. She 
was a native of Montgomery County 
and spent 36 years in the County 
school system, and was a pioneer in 
the field of student guidance. At the 
time of her passing she was Vice 
Principal of the Bethesda-Chevy 
Chase High School, and one of the 
most respected educators in the 
County. The following tribute was 
written by one of her closest friends, 
Dean Adclc Hagncr Stamp. 



Materlinck has said "The dead arc 
dead only when we stop talking about 
them" so our Dorothy Young will 
never die. 



The important thing to remember 
is not that she died but that she lived. 
Her life was one of service to others 
until the end. Her honesty, loyalty, 
integrity and friendliness were appar- 
ent to all who came in contact with 
her. She had that rare gift of always 
bringing out the best in everyone. She 
touched our lives to finer issues and 
gave to us of her own vibrant strength 
and purpose. We shall always miss 
her. Her place can never be filled by 
another and she will always live on 
in the grateful memories of her stu- 
dents and friends as an inspiration. 

Forty years ago when she came to 
Maryland as a freshman she smiled 
her way into my heart, there always 
to remain forever lovely. — A.H.S. 



Directory of Advertisers 



Acme Iron Works 29 

Alcazar 28 

American Disinfectant Co. 28 
American Telephone and Telegraph 

Company Hack (over 

Anchor Post Products Co.. Inc 27 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co.. Inc. 28 
Arundel Federal Savings & Loan As-n. 



Baltimore Envelope Co. 

Bard Avon School 

Bergmann's Laundry 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., Inc. 

Bon Ton Food Products 

Briggs Construction Co.. Inc. 



Thomas E. Carroll & Son 

D. Harry Chambers. Opticiai . - 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 

Del Haven White House Motel 

Farmers Cooperative Assn. 
J. H. Filbert Co. 
First Federal Savings & Loa 
Fuller & d'Albert. Inc. 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co. 
Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 



Harvey Dairy 
Hotel Harrington 



Kidwell & Kidwell. Inc. 

King Bros.. Inc. 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co. 



33 

35 



30 
31 

31 



35 
33 



30 

26 



John D. Lucas Printing Company 32 

Lustine Chevrolet .29 

Maria's Restaurant 26 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 33 

Massey-Ferguson. Inc. 32 

Modern Machinists Co. ... 35 

Murray-Baumgartner Surgical 

Instrument Co.. Inc. 26 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co.. Inc. .<2 

North Washington Press. Inc. 35 

Norman Motor Company. Inc .>(! 

Oles Envelope Corp .33 

Olney Inn 13 

Ottenberg's Bakers. Inc. 35 



Park Transfer Co. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co.. Inc. 

Seidenspinner Realtor 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Mrs. Smith's Colonial Baking I 

Strayer College 

Student's Supply Store 

Suburban Trust Co. 

Sweetheart Bread 



Thomsson Steel Co., Inc. 

Vermont Federal Savings \- Loan Assn. 

Wallop & Son, Insurance 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange Inc. 

Westinghouse Electric Corp. 

Perrj ( 1. Wilkinson 

Williams Construction Company. Inc. 

I. McKenny Willis & Sons. Inc. 



York Wholesalers, Inc. 
Dukt Zeibert's Restaurant 



28 

26 
29 
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34 
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35 

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31 

27 

26 

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27 

,,. 
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36 



The Maryland Magazine 




««■■■■■■ 



Maryland Alumni European Tours 

For 1963 

CENTRAL EUROPE OR SCANDINAVIA 

JULY 6 TO AUGUST 6, 1963 

CENTRAL EUROPE $949— England, Holland, Germany, 
Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Austria, Italy, and France. 

SCANDINAVIA $975— England, Scotland, Norway, Sweden, 
Denmark, Germany, Holland, Belgium, and France. 

Complete Tour or "Flight Only" Information. Contact Victor Holm, 
Alumni Office, U. of Md., College Park or call AP 7-5745 




A board chairman talks about tomorrow's executives... 



The Bell System has always sought men who could keep 
telephone service constantly improving. Men with ex- 
ceptional engineering talent, men with equally outstand- 
ing managerial potential. Such men are widely sought 
on college campuses across the United States. And with 
the future of communications unfolding so rapidly, the 
search has intensified. 

But still there is the old question to be answered, 
"What kind of man handles a business challenge best?" A 
midwestern college audience recently heard these comments 
in a talk by A.T.&T. Board Chairman, Frederick R. Kappel: 

"...We took the records of 17,000 college men in the busi- 
ness who could fairly be compared with each other, and, 
examining their records, sought the answer to the question: 
'To what extent does success in college predict success in 
the Bell System?'... 

"...The results... 

"• . . The single most reliable predictive indicator of 
a college graduate's success in the Bell Syst em is his 
rank in his graduating class. 

"A far greater proportion of high-ranking than low- 
ranking students have qualified for the large responsibil- 



ities While a relationship does exist between college 

quality and salary, rank in class is more significant , . . 

"...What about extracurricular achievement?... Men who 
were campus leaders reached our top salary third in slightly 
greater proportion than those who were not. But it is only 
real campus achievement that seems to have any signifi- 
cance. Mere participation in extracurricular goings-on 
does not... 

"...What we have here, as I said before, are some hints — 
rather strong hints— about where to spend the most time 
looking for the men we do want, the men with intelligence 
plus those other attributes that give you the feel, the sense, 
the reasonable confidence that they will make things move 
and move well They want to excel and they are deter- 
mined to work at it... 

"...Business should aspire to greatness, and search dili- 
gently for men who will make and keep it great..." 

Frederick R. Kappel, Chairman of the Board 
American Telephone and Telegraph Company 



fill BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 

Owned by more than two million Americans 




Volume XXXV Number Two • March-April 1963 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 





d 



j63 
magazine 



■"S I a 




'M-A>'-c*?£ : i- el ' ■ •. 






^ 






#&* 






' 



I.-, 


















- 



■ - ; #T. 



§3 











Maryland Alumni European Tours 

For 1963 



CENTRAL EUROPE OR SCANDINAVIA 



JULY 6 TO AUGUST 6, 1963 

CENTRAL EUROPE $949— England, Holland, Germany, 
Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Austria, Italy, and France. 

SCANDINAVIA $975— England, Scotland, Norway, Sweden, 
Denmark, Germany, Holland, Belgium, and France. 

Complete Tour or "Flight Only" Information. Contact Victor Holm, 
Alumni Office, U. of Md., College Park or call AP 7-5745 



the 




magazine 



IVEaryland 



1 v#S 

I 3 P * 




I 







Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXV Number 2 

The Cover: As promised in the last issue, we present an imaginative view 
of the Baltimore campus drawn by artist Howard Behrens, Arts and Sci- 
ences '61. Professional schools alumni will immediately recognize the 
architectural features which the artist has emphasized. The illustration is 
especially appropriate to this issue which carries a photographic essay 
"An Interne's Friday Night," beginning on the next page. In the January- 
February issue we published an illustration by Behrens representing the 
College Park campus. For purposes of comparison, both are reproduced 
in miniature here. The Baltimore cover was drawn with charcoal; the 
College Park cover with ink — scratch board. Again, we will be pleased 
to send an 8 x 10 photograph of the cover illustration without commercial 
message and without cost. The response to our offer of copies of the 
College Park illustration was gratifying. 



Z* An Interne's Friday Night 

J. 1 The Alumni Diary 

1 J* Alumni and Campus Notes 

1 T" Students Enrolled in Honors Program 

J. D The Ageless Problem of Equitable' Representation 

1 y Inside Maryland Sports 

L* 1 Through the Years 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 

HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 

LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

RICHARD W. CASE 

DR. WILLIAM B. LONG, M.D. 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 

WILLIAM C.WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. MCCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
HARRY E. HASSLINGER '33, President 
DR. EDWARD STONE, JR., '25, Vice-President 
MRS. ERNA RIEDEL CHAPMAN, '34, Vice-Preoident 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. BARBARA HARRIGAN, Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



AD VERTISING DIRECTORS 
MRS. H. B. GILLESPIE 

41 1 Range Road 

Baltimore 4, Md. 

828-9050 



RICHARD F. ROSS 
6136 Parkway Drive 
Baltimore 12. Md 
435-6767 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park, Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March3, 1879. -$3.00 peryear-Fifty cents the copy-Member of American Alumni Council. 




An Interne's Friday Night 

Doctor Lawrence Raymond Gallager is an interne at 
University Hospital. He is 28, married, and a father. 
This is the photographic record of one of his nights 
in the Accident Emergency Ward at the Hospital. 
It is a Friday night in October. Dr. Gallager's 
medical challenges — cut wrist, smoke inhalation, loss of 
an eye, heart attack, assorted head injuries and others- 
end only when the last report is filed and the night is quiet. 



PHOTOGRAPHS BY EMORY KRISTOF 



March-April, 1963 



3 






9 

r 




DOCTOR GALLAGER WAS BORN IN WEST CHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA. HE 
received his premedical education at Haverford College where he 
majored in biology. He worked as a student assistant in embryology where 
he assisted with the laboratory courses in his junior and senior years. In 
extracurricular activities he was athletically inclined but due to a serious 
head injury that was incurred in football during his freshman year in col- 
lege he had to relinquish his desire for active participation in sports and 
become the manager of the fencing team and varsity football. He rounded 
out his extracurricular activities by participating in an active way in 
Haverford's social events. He married during his junior year in college, 
and entered the University of Maryland School of Medicine in September 
1958 as a serious student knowing much about the society he was preparing 
to serve. 

In the School of Medicine, Doctor Gallager stood scholastically in the 
upper third of his class, was elected to A.O.A., and won the Theodore E. 
Woodward Award for excellence in Internal Medicine upon graduation. 
Doctor Gallager chose to intern in University Hospital in Internal Medicine 
and during the past year, in addition to fulfilling the demands of this educa- 
tional program, has begun to participate in the research programs in 
Cardiology. He plans to continue his education in Internal Medicine and 
the School has high hopes that he will one day be an important teacher and 
a medical specialist of note. 



March-April, 1963 




A LITTLE 






the Maryland Magazine 



BOY IS MENDED 






The terror of pain and the unknown flees 
before the quick skill of the interne 



March-April, 1963 



MEDICAL EDUCATION 



HEALTH IS MORE THAN THE ABSENCE OF DISEASE, INJURY, OR M\l- 
function of the body and its parts. The adjustment of the individual 
to the requirements of society and to environment are also important 
factors with a strong influence on health. 

The premedical period is one in which a broad education must be obtained 
with considerable development in the biological and physical sciences. 
This must be accompanied by the individual maturing to the point where 
he has a great appreciation of the social sciences, and society. 

The educational period in the medical school is largely used in a further 
development of the individual's knowledge in the sciences as they apply to 
health and the development of sensitivity and judgment in the recognition 
of disease and injury and/or defective malfunction of the mind and body 
of the patient. 

The post M.D. (intern and residency) period of education is largely used 
in the development of knowledge and skills in limited fields of medicine 
such as general practice, pediatrics, obstetrics, surgery, or psychiatry. It is 
also the period where experience and studious reexamination of informa- 
tion and experience does much to mature the judgment of the physician. 

j When formal education ends the physician must be so conditioned and 
devoted to the welfare of his patients that he continues to be a critical and 
an imaginative student of medicine for the remainder of his professional life. 

The School of Medicine continues to devote its energies and talent to these 
objectives and to provide the proper environment and stimulation for the 
able student to excel in his profession. The development of the new basic 
science area in Howard Hall, the expansion and improvement of University 
Hospital and its clinics, the new Health Sciences Library, and the Student 
Union are important factors in improving the educational opportunities 
in medicine and related health professional fields on the Baltimore Campus. 
5 These, coupled with a talented faculty doing work in teaching and re- 
| search, promise much for the student that selects Medicine for a career. 









THE 

NIGHT 

ENDS 

Then, home for supper 

and, the next day, 

a romp 

with his son 




10 



the Maryland Magazine 



The General Alumni Council 
school and college 

HEP RESENT A 77 VES : 

AGRICULTURE 

Mylo Downey, '27 
Abram Z. Gottwals, '38 
H. M. Carroll, '20 

ARTS & SCIENCES 

Joe Mathias, '35 
Jess Krajovic, '32 
Richard Bourne, '57 

BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas E. Bourne, Jr. 
Chester W. Tawney, '3 1 
Jacob B. Sclar, '34 

DENTISTRY 

Dr. Charles E. Broadrup, '32 
Dr. Edward D. Stone, Jr., '25 
Dr. George B. Clendenin, '29 

EDUCATION 

Edward S. Beach, Jr., '49 
Harry E. Hasslinger, '33 
Miss Dorothy Ordwein, '35 

ENGINEERING 

Emmett T. Loane, '29 
Tracy Coleman, '35 
James A. Stapp, Jr., '47 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Ruth Lee Thompson Clarke, '42 
Mrs. Mary Ward Davis, '55 
Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '43 



Hon. W. Albert Menchine, '29 
Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 
Hon. Joseph L. Carter, '25 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Arthur G. Siwinski, '31 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 
Dr. Frank K. Morris 

NURSING 

Mrs. E. Elizabeth Roth Hipp, '29 

Miss Doris Stevens, '51 

Mrs. Kathryn P. Donnelly, '48 

PHARMACY 



Hyman Davidov '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen '25 
Dr. Frank J. Slama '24 



EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, A&S '38 

Director & Executive Secretary 
Victor Holm, A&S '57 

Field Secretary 
Past Presidents 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, DDS '19 
C. V. Koons, Engr. '29 
Talbot T. Speer, Agr. '17 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, MD '12 
Col. O. H. Saunders, Engr. '10 
J. Homer Remsberg, Agr. '18 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, LL.B. '33 
Joseph H. Deckman, Engr. '3 1 
Frank Block, Phar. '24 
Harry A. Boswell, Jr., BPA '42 
Mrs. Elizabeth Rohr Singleton, 

Nurs. '47; Edu. '51 
Dr. Reginald V. Truitt, A&S '14 

• 
ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENTATIVES : 
Baltimore — John L. Lampe, A&S, '50 
"M" Club— George W. Knepley, Edu., '39 
Montgomery County — Donald M. Boyd 
Pittsburgh — A. B. "Budd" Fisher, Eng '26 
Prince Georges County — 

Dr. John W. Cronin, DDS '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, Agr. '36 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, Agr. '19 
U. S. Department of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, Agr. '26 
Washington County — 

Charles B. Huyett, A&S '53 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



CLASS REUNIONS ARE Mil sI'ECTACUl AK. I Ills CONCLUSION, Rl Ullll) Hi 
a number of "professional alumni workers." has some merit, unless 
you happen to be a party to a reunion. This is my twenty-fifth. My elass 
president has responded with "Your letter sent me back to the Yearbook foi 
a lot of perusing, reminiscing and wondering." 

May 1 I, a Saturday, will be a day for dusting off old memories. It will 
be Alumni Day on the College Park campus. Graduates ol the professional 
schools will for the most part concentrate on early June activities. Special 
reunions with the usual "Five Year" emphasis are being planned, lor some 
the effort to return may be too great, the distance too far. or the event 
too un-spectacular. 

Let us see what it means to a nurse from the Class of 1903. From her 
hospital bed, where she is recovering from a fall which broke her hip. she 
says "I'll walk in for my Sixtieth Reunion." Or to a class president, now 
a colonel, "'63 arrived a lot faster than expected. It will be a tremendous 
experience to see those guys and gals we used to know; to feel again that 
surge of youthful spirit and to leave immeasurably and mysteriously strength- 
ened." 

Such reactions emphasize the importance of keeping alive the reunion 
pattern as long as there are alumni who want to return. Athletic events, 
planned tours, special meals, and other festivities have significance to 
alumni, but cannot compare to a warm handshake and the familiar "remember 
when we ?" 

After the pranks and close calls have been adequately reviewed, there 
will be brief reaction to the eye-catchers in the form of many new and im- 
posing buildings. Soon, however, these will become more familiar and some- 
what less meaningful. There will follow more serious talk concerning children 
and grandchildren. A few will recall quite proudly that their University is one 
of the oldest, as well as one of the largest. A convincing voice will have some- 
thing to say about the responsibility of the University to teach and to provide 
leadership. The alumnus of every age recalls the youngster finding his way 
to a strange campus for that first self-conscious glimpse oi the home-to-be 
through at least four years of college. 

Time has passed and many alumni are strangely ditTerent. There must of 
necessity be remarks about hair lines, waist lines, and face lines. The physical 
characteristics have changed, just as the face of the University campus has 
been altered. Still, young and old agree on the responsibility and purpose 
of the University. 

Ten, twenty or fifty years ago, the University had a responsibility to 
emphasize the dignity and worth of the individual. In our American way-of- 
life it becomes the charge of the educator to convey this concept of dignity 
and worth to our youth in such a way that they will not only know it and 
believe it, but also live it. 

The returning alumnus, by action and conversation, will let those around 
him know that he is aware of his dignity and his worth. He will let us know 
that loyalties are founded in knowledge and are rooted in the traditions and 
ideals of the sources of this knowledge. 

Reunions may not be spectacular, but they do recall the patient direc- 
tion given by a few to whom the dignity of the individual and the development 
of the mind were important. Reunion time is for remembering, for enjoying, 
and for dreaming. 



March-April, J 963 



II 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



APRIL 



I 1 

11 
II 



13 
13 
15 
15 
16 
16 
17 



Easter Recess Begins After Last 

Class. 

Golf, Hopkins, Home. 

Lacrosse, New Hampshire, 

Home. 

Baseball, South Carolina, Home. 

Track, Duke, Away. 

Baseball, South Carolina, Home. 

Baseball, Clemson, Home. 

Lacrosse, Duke, Away. 

Baseball, Clemson, Home. 

Easter Recess Ends, 8 a.m. 

University of Maryland 

Symphony. 



19 


Baseball, Duke, Away. 


26-27 


Track, Penn Relays, 


19 


Miriam Makeba Concert. 




Philadelphia. 


19 


Tennis, Wake Forest, Away. 


27 


Baseball, North Carolina State 


20 


Baseball, Wake Forest, Away. 




Home. 


20 


Track, North Carolina, Home. 


27 


Lacrosse, Navy, Away. 


7,0 


Lacrosse, University of Balti- 


27 


Senior Class Presents: Peter 




more, Home. 




Paul & Mary. 


20 


Tennis, North Carolina, Away. 


27 


Tennis, Navy, Home. 


22 


Golf, Wake Forest, Home. 


29 


Baseball, Penn State, Home. 


23 


Baseball, Virginia, Away. 


29 


Golf, Duke, Home. 


23 


Golf, North Carolina, Home. 


30 


Tennis, Duke, Home. 


23 


Tennis, Virginia, Home. 


30 


Band Concert. 


24 


Tennis, Hopkins, Away. 






26 


Baseball, North Carolina, Home. 






26 


Golf, Penn State, Home. 







Faculty Members Receive Academy of Science Awards 



Two University of Maryland faculty 
members have received Awards for Sci- 
entific Achievement in 1962, presented 
by the Washington Academy of Sciences 
in February at the 65th annual dinner 
meeting in the John Wesley Powell 
Auditorium in Washington, D. C. 

The winners were Dr. Bruce L. Rein- 
hart. Associate Professor of Math- 
ematics, in the field of mathematics, 
"tor his contributions to the topology 
of diffcrcntiable manifolds"; and Dr. 
Edward A. Mason, Professor of Molec- 
ular Physics, in the field of physical 
sciences, "for his many outstanding con- 
tributions to the topology of differenti- 
able manifolds." 

Dr. Reinhart and Dr. Mason were 
introduced by Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, 
President of the University. 

General Chairman of the Committee 
on Awards for Scientific Achievement 
was Dr. John S. Toll, Head of the 



Department of Physics and Astronomy 
at the University. Dr. George Anastos, 
Head of the Zoology Department, served 
on the Panel on Biological Sciences, 
Dr. Leon Cohen, head of the Math- 
ematics Department, served on the 
Mathematics Panel, and Dr. Ellis R. 
Lippincott, Professor of Chemistry, 
served on the Panel on Physical Sci- 
ences. 

University of Maryland recipients of 
Academy of Science awards in previous 
years included: Dr. San-ju Shen, 1958, 
engineering sciences, "in recognition of 
his pioneering work on panel flutter and 
boundary layer theory"; Dr. Helen Gar- 
stens, 1958, teaching of science field, 
"in recognition of outstanding teaching 
of mathematics," and again in 1960, 
"for scientific achievement in the de- 
velopment of curriculum materials in 
teacher training"; Dr. Richard A. Fer- 
rell, 1960, physical sciences, for his 



"contribution to the theory of collective 
effects in nuclei and solids"; Dr. Robert 
W. Krauss, 1961, biological sciences, a 
"pioneer in the applied development of 
algaes ... an inspiring teacher and col- 
league"; Dr. Ralph D. Myers, 1961, 
teaching of science field, "for outstand- 
ing contribution to post graduate educa- 
tion of area physicists"; and Dr. Law- 
rence Payne, 1961, mathematics, for 
his "contribution to theory of partial 
differential equations." 

Dr. Geoffrey F. Ludford, a 1959 
winner in the field of mathematics, is 
now a Professor at Cornell University 
in Ithaca, New York, and Dr. Joseph 
Weber, Professor in the Department of 
Physics and Astronomy and a 1957 
award winner in the field of engineering 
science, is presently on leave from the 
University to the Institute for Ad- 
vanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 



Some Recent Grants 
to the University 

For an undergraduate instructional sci- 
entific equipment program. 

National Science Foundation to De- 
partment of Chemistry 

$17,500. 

For support of an elementary school 
science curriculum study. 

National Science Foundation to De- 
partment of Physics 

$40,250. 

For forgivable loans to doctoral stu- 
dents. 

Ford Foundation to Coi i ege of 

Engineering 

$25,000. 

* 

For research in the application of 
mathematics to biological problems. 

U.S. Navy to Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
$21,395. 

* 

For studies on imunochemistry of filarial 
infections. 

World Health Organization to De- 
partment of Zoology 
$5,000. 

To extend research on GM tubes. 

Bureau of Ships, Navy Department 
to Department of Physics 
$30,000. 

For a study of agricultural education 
in the United States. 

Carnegie Corporation of New York 
to the University 

$200,000. 

For research on boundary layer insta- 
bility and transition. 

U.S. Air Force to Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Math- 
ematics 

$36,695. 

* 

To support study of basic mechanisms 
by which the brain regulates reproduc- 
tive processes. 

National Institutes of Health to 

School of Medicine 

$119,254. 

* 

For study of species variation in blood 
protein patterns. 

National Science Foundation to De- 
partment of Zoology 
$14,800. 



73 Alumni Employed in 
Baltimore Firm 

There are 73 University ol Maryland 
alumni presently employed at the Haiti- 
more (>as and Electric Company. They 

include: 

Electrical Hngineering G. V. Bres- 
nick. "48. M. C. Albriltain. "23, I S. 
Bailey, Jr.. '50, R. H. Lund, '55, W. W. 
Ward. Jr.. '52, A. A. Smith. Jr.. '51, 
F. H. Rogers. '25, E. H. Engelbert, '47, 
J. C. Gorub, "4 l >. E. S. Hawkins. 47. 
J. A. Herold. '35, R. Berg, '59, J. J. 
Wright, '60; Civil Engineering — M. E. 
Griffith, '55, R. H. Kent. '43, R. (.. 
Warner, '28. P. Hahn. '56, H. I. Roehl, 
'51, D. T. Ward. '62; Mechanical Engi- 
neering — G. F. Steinmetz, Jr. '49. G. V. 
McGowan, '51, W. G. Mclvin, '23. 
C. W. Meyer, '41, A. A. Hall. Jr., '50, 
A. E. Lundvall, Jr., '50, P. A. Malonev. 
'51, J. E. Aldridge, '34, F. Martin, Jr., 
'50, E. L. Poffenberger, '58, M. L. 
Peterson, Jr., '47, L. J. Fosler, '60, R. E. 
Yost, '62; Chemical Engineering — R. Z. 
Spitznas, '57. 

Law— J. J. Doyle, '24, N. M. Callo- 
way, '25, B. Chambers, '25, I. F. Freed, 
'29, M. Goldstein, '29, B. T. Zamanski, 
'30, W. H. Driver, '31, C. H. Gunders- 
dcrff, '32, A. E. Penn, '34, O. K. Boyd, 
'38, F. E. Rugemer, '43, P. W. L. 
Disney, '48, B. H. Bishop, '50, D. Eid- 
man, '50, L. A. Beck, Jr., '51, E. W. 
Koch, '52, B. C. Trueschler, '52. 

Marketing — C. E. Kohlhaus, '52; Ag- 
ricultural Education — C. W. St. Clair. 
'43; Business Administration — R. A. 
Clemens, '54, D. R. Chesser, '50, S. M. 
Kriel, Jr., '54, L. E. Delcher, '60; In- 
dustrial Education — R. A. Diehl, '57, 
C. L. Nelson, Jr., '43; Political Science 
—J. C. Wasten, '52; Personnel — W. C. 
Orndorff, Jr., '51; Agriculture— B. H. 
Miller, '28; Economics — W. A. Streett 
(m.a.), '28; Mathematics and Science — 
E. M. Gordy, '39; Education— J. M. 
Files, '57, D. R. Smith (M.S.), '53; 
History — I. V. Cockerham, '47; Chem- 
istry— E. F. Wolf (M.S.), '28; Medicine 
— W. T. Muse, '40; Horticulture — I. O. 
Bauer, Jr., '50; Sociology — M. W. 
Herbst, '59, A. P. Grape, '51; Home 
Economics — N. Beryk, '61; Philosophy 
—J. E. PlumhofF, Jr., '62. 

Mr. McCormick Serves as 
Crusade Bowl Chairman 

Charles P. McCormick, Chairman of 
the University's Board of Regents and 
of McCormick and Company, served as 
an Honorary Chairman of the first an- 
nual Cancer Crusade Bowl football 
game in Memorial Stadium on Jan- 
uary 6. 

Serving with Mr. McCormick were 
Governor Tawes, Judge J. Harold 
Grady, and Phillip H. Goodman, Mayor 
of Baltimore. 



Alumnus Appointed to 
International Post 

Paul a. Pumpian, \.\s 18, Pharm 
I I B. '53, formed) an Assistant I 

lessor al the .School ol Pli.un 

where he lectured in jurisprudence, was 

recently appointed ( h.iimi.in ol the 

I ;iu and Legislative < ommittee ol the 

Intel national Narcotic 1 nlorceineiit 
Officers Association. 

Mr. Pumpian, who is both a phar- 
macist and an attorney, is charged with 
administering Wisconsin's Drug and 
Narcotic Laws. He is currently sctmiil' 
as Chairman Ol the (ommittee on legis- 
lation of the National Association ol 
Boards of Pharmacy and as a membei 

of the Drug I. aw Committee of the 
American Bar Association, He has 
served as Chairman of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association's Section on 
Education and Legislation and as a 
member of the Association's Committee 
on Legislation. 



Alumni Awarded 
Gold, Silver Medals 

Abner Brenner, Ph.D., Chemistry, '39, 
was among four employees of the Na- 
tional Bureau of Standards who recently 
received the Department of Commerce 
Gold Medal Exceptional Service Award 
for 1962. This is the highest honor con- 
ferred on employees by the Department 
for outstanding contributions to the 
public service, the nation or humanity. 

Mr. Brenner received his award "for 
contributions of the highest order to 
the development of the technology of 
electroplating and its application to 
problems in industry and government." 

Another alumnus. Thomas W. Mears, 
B.S., Chemistry, '35, was one of IS 
staff members at the Bureau who re- 
ceived Silver Medal Meritorious Service 
Awards for services of unusual value to 
the Department. His award was pre- 
sented "for meritorious researches in 
synthesis, purification, and analyses 
during a long period of time, and for 
development of a number of superior 
standard reference materials and meth- 
ods." 

The Gold and Silver Medal winners 
received their awards in February from 
Secretary Luther H. Hodges at the 15th 
Annual Awards Program of the De- 
partment of Commerce. 



Pharmacy Alumni Dance 

The Sixteenth Annual Frolic of the 
Alumni Association of the School of 
Pharmacy was held in the Straus Audi- 
torium in Baltimore on November S. 
The audience, numbering approximately 

Continued on Page 20 



March- April, 1963 



13 







35 Students Enrolled in Honors Program 



THIRTY-FIVE STUDENTS ARE ENROLLED IN THE HONORS 
program, recently established by the College of Arts 
and Sciences to encourage superior academic performance. 
Enrollment by departments is English, nine; History, six; 
Foreign Languages, two; Mathematics, nine; Physics, 
seven; and Psychology, two. 

To be admitted to the honors program, a student must 
meet a minimum grade average of better than B. In addi- 
tion, students are carefully screened by a departmental 
honors committee to determine if they have the ability and 
maturity to work independently and responsibly. 

At Commencement Exercises last June, some 13 stu- 
dents enrolled in the honors program won departmental 
honors: English, high honors — one student; honors — three 
students; Mathematics, high honors — one student; honors 
— two students; Psychology, honors — three students; 
Physics, high honors — one student; honors — two students. 

The general aim of the honors program is to encourage 
and recognize superior scholarship and to provide qualified 
students with a maximum opportunity for intensive and 
independent study. 

The honors program of each department is set up and 
administered by a departmental honors committee. The 
College Committee on Honors Programs, chaired by Dr. 
Aubrey C. Land, Head of the Department of History, acts 
as an advisory and regulatory body. Admission to the pro- 



14 



gram is ordinarily at the beginning of the first or second 
semester of the junior year. In all departments, a com- 
prehensive oral and written examination is given at the 
completion of the senior year. Evaluation is based on the 
student's work and examination and, as a result, the honors 
committee may recommend that the student be graduated 
with high honors, honors, or that no honors recognition 
be accorded. 

Another special honors program now underway is the 
all-University Honors in Literature, open to undergraduate 
students in any college of the University who have the 
approval of their dean and of the head of the department 
of English. Though it is administered by the English De- 
partment, under the direction of Dr. Mary Andrews, the 
program is not exclusively an English Department program. 

Special courses developed for the Honors in Literature 
are English 3 and 4, which are based on the study of an 
approved list of literary works, including translations from 
foreign languages. Enrollment figures show that, in the 
Spring semester of 1962, there were 257 students enrolled 
in English 3 and 98 enrolled in English 4, and in the Fall 
semester of 1962, 58 students were enrolled in English 3 
and 164 in English 4. Projected figures for the Spring 
semester of 1963 indicate that 375 students will be en- 
rolled in English 3 and 125 in English 4. 



the Maryland Magazine 



ifraw 



■ -« 








From Ancient Greece 
to World Government: 

77/€ Ageless Problem of Equitable 

Representation 



GERRYMANDERING AND REDISTRICTING, ROTTEN BOROUGHS AND REAPPORTION- 
ment, over-representation and under-representation — these are terms often 
encountered in the annals of politics, ancient and modern. Wherever rep- 
resentative government exists or is proposed, the problem of equitable representa- 
tion inevitably appears upon the scene. 

Districting and redistricting are neutral terms, signifying neither praise nor con- 
demnation, but merely involving the drawing of district lines to designate areas from 
which officials will be chosen. But when the lines are drawn in a manner deliberately 
designed to favor one party (or tribe or race or area or ideology) against another. 
the action has come to be known as "gerrymandering." 

Although the partisan drawing of boundary lines is as old as history, the new 
term came into existence when Governor Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts redrew 
the districts of his state, producing one which had the appearance of a salamander. 
A news reporter called it a Gerry-mander, creating a new and meaningful word 
for the English language. 

March- April, 1963 



15 



THE WORD "GERRYMANDER" WAS SOON USED BY 
historians to describe acts of rulers as ancient as 
the sixth century B.C. James R. Joy in his Grecian 
History of 1900 thusly describes the changes made 
by a new ruler, Clisthenes, in an attempt to retain recently 
won power: 

IN ORDER TO PREVENT ANY SINGLE TRIBE 
[ROM BECOMING THE STRONGHOLD OF 
ONE OF THE OLD PARTIES, HE GERRY- 
MANDERED THE STATE, ASSIGNING PLAIN- 
DEMES, MOUNTAIN-DEMES, AND SHORE- 
DEMES TO THE SAME TRIBE. THUS ATHENS 
I I SELF, THE ONLY LARGE CITY, WAS SPLIT 
INTO NUMEROUS DISTRICTS ALLOTTED 
AMONG DIFFERENT TRIBES, AND IT MUST 
BE REMEMBERED THAT THE MUNICIPAL- 
ITY HAD NO SEPARATE MUNICIPAL GOV- 
ERNMENT. 

Here was an act of gerrymandering devised to change 
power-balances by the actual redrawing of the boundary 
lines. With an increased population in certain areas com- 
bined with static or decreasing population in neighboring 
areas, the controlling faction may obtain a relative in- 
crease in power by refusing to redraw boundary lines. This 
inaction is sometimes called the "silent gerrymander." 
Although long since corrected, the extremes to which re- 
fusal to act can lead was illustrated by England's "rotten 
borough" system under which existed the absurdity of a 
town with a population of fourteen having two members 
in Parliament while very large cities had none. 

Redistricting in the United States sometimes refers to 
the drawing of boundary lines for the purpose of repre- 
sentation in state legislatures or even on city councils, but 
the problem most often referred to by the term is that of 
the drawing of Congressional boundary lines. 

There is, of course, no problem if a state is entitled 
to one Congressman only. He runs state-wide. But if the 
state has more than one Congressman, a decision must 
be made as to whether a district shall be established for 
each Congressman. Congress has thus far left these func- 
tions to the state legislatures. They have not evidenced 
any great concern that districts should be composed of 
approximately equal population, and the juggling of areas 
from district to district for the purpose of reaping partisan 
advantage has produced districts appearing even more 
weird than Governor Gerry's salamander. The present 
variation is between districts of approximately 200,000 
population to those of about one million. Maryland's 
First Congressional District has a population of about 
240,000 while the Fifth District has about 725,000. 

In early American history the gerrymandered Congres- 
sional districts were sometimes related to the selection of 
Presidential electors. Since the United States Constitution 
provided that Presidential electors would be selected in 
whatever manner the state legislatures should provide, 
there was no necessary uniformity from state to state. 
The right still exists, of course, but there is uniform cus- 
tom today that electors are chosen by the people in the 




general election state-wide. This came to be known as the 
"General Ticket" method. In the early days, however, some 
legislatures chose the electors while in other states the 
electors were chosen by the people on a district basis, 
usually the same as Congressional districts. Maryland 
used the district system until 1836, the electoral vote 
usually being split between the political parties. 

An incident involving the Presidential elector problem 
occurred in New York in 1800. New York's practice was 
that the legislature chose the electors, but anti-Federalist 
strength was shown in the spring election of new state 
legislators, causing Alexander Hamilton to fear that New 
York's vote would go in its entirety to Thomas Jefferson. 
He thereupon wrote to Governor John Jay and proposed 
that a special session of the lame-duck legislature be called 
for the purpose of passing a districting act for the choos- 
ing of electors. Such a law would insure a split vote, with 
some going to Adams. Hamilton told Jay that the "anti- 
federal majority in the ensuing Legislature . . . will bring 
Jefferson into the chief magistracy, unless it is prevented 
by the measure" proposed by Hamilton. Recognizing 
moral objections to the proposal, Hamilton said "in 
times like these in which we live, it will not do to be 
overscrupulous. Scruples of delicacy and propriety . . . 
ought not to hinder the taking of a legal and constitu- 
tional step to prevent an atheist in religion, and a fanatic 
in politics, from getting possession of the helm of state." 
Governor Jay rejected Hamilton's proposal, noting on the 
letter that it proposed "a measure for party purposes, which 
I think would not become me to adopt." 

There were later attempts to manipulate the Presidential 
electoral votes for "party purposes," but expectations 
eventually caused the state legislatures to act uniformly 
in adopting the "General Ticket" system or state-wide 
election of Presidential electors. 

The principal reason for Presidential elector manipula- 
tion and for unequal populations among Congressional 
districts continues to exist. That reason is the unrepre- 
sentative character, in terms of population, of the state 
legislatures themselves — often referred to as malappor- 
tionment. 



by DR. ELBERT M. BYRD, Jr., Assistant Professor of Government and 
Politics, the College of Business and Public Administration at the University. 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 



Whereas gerrymandering or maldistricting refers to the 

inequitable drawing of district boundary lines, malappor- 
tionment refers to the inequitable distribution of legis- 
lative seats among the districts. In other words, districts 
can be drawn so as to be virtually perfect on a popula- 
tion basis, but the fairness of the arrangement may be 
completely nullified if one district is given ten representa- 
tives in the state legislature while another district of similar 
population is given one representative. 

Of course, maldistricting and malapportionment arc 
often used in combination to effect desired ends. In his 
Outline of History, H. G. Wells writes of the use oi these 
techniques during the days of the Roman Republic: 

WHENEVER THERE WAS A NEW ENFRAN- 
CHISEMENT OF CITIZENS IN ITALY, THERE 
WOULD BE THE MOST ELABORATE TRICK- 
ERY AND COUNTER-TRICKERY TO ENROLL 
THE NEW VOTERS INTO AS FEW OR AS 
MANY OF THE THIRTY OLD "TRIBES" AS 
POSSIBLE, OR TO PUT THEM INTO AS FEW 
AS POSSIBLE NEW TRIBES. . . . HERE WAS 
THE SORT OF WORK TO FASCINATE EVERY 
SMART KNAVE IN POLITICS. THE COMITA 
TRIBUTA COULD BE WORKED AT TIMES SO 
AS TO VOTE RIGHT COUNTER TO THE GEN- 
ERAL FEELING OF THE PEOPLE. 

It was this kind of manipulation which frustrated the 
representation of the people in the popular assembly, and 
contributed to the fall of republicanism in Rome and to 
the rise of Caesarism or dictatorial rule. Historically there 
are trends which appear to make it a reasonable conclusion 
that the reaction to a non-representative assembly is either 
strike and insurrection or demand for a stronger executive, 
and often a combination of both. There was apparently 
feelings tending in this direction in Maryland in 1850, 
particularly observable in Baltimore where resentment to 
under-representation was strong, and from which came 
demands for a Constitutional Convention. The convention 
was called only after Governor Philip Thomas warned that 
unless it was done "the sanction of the Legislature would 
not much longer be invoked." 

In post World War II America the problem of appor- 
tionment has become more and more accentuated as a 
result of the increase in population and the mobility there- 
of. The population of many suburban counties has doubled 
and doubled again while the representation of those areas 
in the state legislatures remained unchanged. In some 
states a change could be made only by constitutional 
amendment while in others the stote constitutions provided 
that the legislatures should reapportion themselves every 
ten years. The distinction made little difference. Minority- 
dominated legislatures refused to reapportion. 

Having been continually rebuffed by the legislatures, 
those who agitated for more equitable representation 
turned to the courts. They scored a landmark victory in 
the spring of 1962 when the United States Supreme Court 
ruled in the case of Baker v. Carr that the Federal courts 
have jurisdiction to determine whether or not malappor- 
tioned legislatures deprive citizens of the state the "equal 
protection of the law" required by the Fourteenth Amend- 
ment to the United States Constitution. Since that time the 
status of apportionment has been in flux. Some legislatures 



have been ordered reapportioned bj l ederal courts, others 
by state courts, and in some no action has yei occurred. 



IN MARY] \\l>. \ si \n (ui i< i in rERMINED I n\l I HI 
House Oi Delegates must he ieappoi lioned hut that 
representation in the Senate need not necessarily be 
changed. I he ( omt oi Appeals oi Maryland upheld 

the decision on the Senate In a \ote oi foui to thl 
I hat decision has been appealed and is now pending m 
the United States Supreme ( omt. 

After the judiciary ordered the House ol Delegates K 
apportioned, the General Assembly was called into special 
session and passed an emergency reapportionment measure 
to be effective lor the session of the General Assembly 
beginning in January 1963. The legislation provided nine- 
teen new seats lor the suburban area, bringing about some 
amelioration of the situation lor the tune being. I here is 
grave doubt that this change meets the standard ol 
equitable representation, but in any event the change is 
temporary only. Apportionment will revert to the old 
status in 1966 unless new action is taken prior to that time. 

Before the temporary change, salient factors about rep- 
resentation in Maryland were as follows. In the House of 
Delegates, representatives of 24 percent of the popula- 
tion had control. Conversely, representatives of 76 percent 
of the population found themselves in the minority. In the 
Senate, representatives of 14 percent of the population 
can still control. Conversely, Senators representing 86 per- 
cent of the population find themselves in the minority. 
This situation derives from the fact that the counties bad 
a minimum of two up to a maximum of six delegates; and 
each county has one Senator regardless of the population 
of the county. Baltimore City was in a special category, 
having thirty-six delegates and six senators. 

Thus, according to 1960 census figures, Kent Count) 
with a population of 15,481 has two members in the House 
of Delegates, and Baltimore County with a population ol 
492,428 had six. Each county had one senator. A resident 
of Kent County had twelve times as much representation 
in the House of Delegates as a resident of Baltimore 
County, and has thirty-three times as much representation 
in the Senate. Although not quite so great, the disparities 
of representation between a small county and other large 
counties, such as Prince George's and Montgomery, were 
similar. 




m* 



W 






March- April, 1963 



17 



! be disparities are not confined to counties of suburban 
and non-suburban differences. The representation formula 
is so outmoded that it has produced such anomalies as 
follows: Frederick County (population 71,930) has six 
members in the House of Delegates while Harford County 
(population 76,720) has four. St. Mary's County (popula- 
tion 38,915) has two delegates while Dorchester County 
(population 29,666) has four. Cecil County (population 
48,408) has three delegates; Garrett County (population 
20,420) has three. 

Whether representation in both Houses should be based 
principally on population, or whether one House should 
represent population and the other geographical area is a 
question now much debated. Those in favor of the latter 
system refer to it as the "Federal Plan," comparing state 
government to Federal government. 

The arrangement to provide equal representation in the 
United States Senate without regard to the population of 
the states, and basing representation in the House of Rep- 
resentatives on population, was a compromise necessary 
to gain the approval of sovereign states. The counties or 
other election districts within the states were, however, 
never sovereign, and this analogy is thus without founda- 
tion. In addition, Baltimore City was long ago given addi- 
tional seats in the Senate of Maryland on the basis of 
population. 

The states had bicameral legislatures before the Federal 
government was created, and this arrangement derived not 
from any Federal ideas but as a transplant of custom from 
Great Britain. There the growth derived from the belief 
that the upper house represented the nobility while the 
lower house should represent the common people — thus 
the House of Commons. If this history should be the guide, 
there would be a retrogression to an understanding that 
representation shall be based on class rather than on 
population or geography. Besides, in early Maryland his- 
tory, the upper house or council was appointed by the 
Proprietary Governor of the Colony. 

Another argument against representation in both Houses 
on the basis of population is the objection that this would 
result essentially in a single house or unicameral legisla- 
ture. As to form, this is, of course, not so. There would 
still be two houses and two different sets of representatives. 
As to substance, or end-product legislation, there is some 
merit to the point — particularly if the legislators come from 
the same election districts and if the citizens allow bossism 
or machine rule to thrive. It is not necessary, however, for 
delegates and senators to be elected from identical areas. 
Delegates could be elected from counties, while senators 
could be elected from districts within populous counties 
and from districts comprising more than one county in 
areas of sparse population. Population would be the prin- 
cipal basis of representation but the geographical area 
represented would be different from that represented in the 
House of Delegates. 

Given these considerations, those who urge a change in 
representation in the Senate do not insist that the Senate 
should be reapportioned on the basis of population to the 
same degree that the House of Delegates should reflect 
population. They do insist that there should be some 
reasonable relation in the Senate between population and 
representation. It is felt particularly that there should not 
be a status under which representatives of a minority of 
the population can control in the Senate, and they par- 



ticularly reject the present situation under which 14 per- 
cent of the population can thwart the will of representatives 
of 86 percent of the population. 

In an open society in which change occurs every day, in 
which population expands and contracts in various areas 
from year to year and census to census, there can be no 
perfect solution. The desired formula is one in which a 
genuine effort is made to adjust to changing population 
patterns as reflected by official census returns. What is 
not desired is the past practice of refusal to reapportion in 
the face of all objective evidence and even in the face of 
constitutional requirements in some states that reapportion- 
ment be accomplished. 

Whatever is done in the American states, there is reason 
to believe that the problem of representation shall be with 
us for ages to come. Representation has been a problem in 
international organizations from ancient Greece to the 
present time. The League of Nations provided preferred 
status for some nations on the basis of power. The United 
Nations does the same in the Security Council, especially 
as reflected in the institution of permanent membership 
and the "veto." In the General Assembly there is equal 
representation without regard to population. In some 
functional agencies, such as the International Monetary 
Fund, there is voting strength based neither on equality 
nor population but rather on the amount of monetary 
contribution made to the Fund. 

The problem of representation in international organiza- 
tions is not, however, essentially of the same character as 
the classic problem because international organizations are 
not governments in the traditional sense. Those who urge 
the establishment of regional or world government have 
found the representational problem to be one of the most 
difficult obstacles. Especially during the period immediately 
after World War II a great deal of thought was given to 
the problem. It was felt, for example, that the United 
States or the Soviet Union would not agree to enter a 
world government in which either would have only one- 
third as much representation as China if population were 
to be the standard of representation. Theoretical plans 
were then proposed which include elements other than 
mere population. Some plans were tied to per capita in- 
come, others to per capita financial support of the world 
government. Still another detailed proposal combined 
population and national educational achievement. An 
individual with one year of formal education would re- 
ceive one point, a college graduate would receive sixteen 
points. By computation each country would have a total 
number of "educational years of national accomplishment," 
and the representation would be based on the "educational 
years." As of 1945 the United States would have 88 
World Assembly representatives, Russia 59, China 20. 
Although the plan was said to have a built-in "self correc- 
tive," in that it would provide an incentive for all coun- 
tries to fight illiteracy and emphasize education, there 
was no discernible rush to adopt the proposal. 

It is not yet claimed that world government exists — of a 
representative nature or otherwise. But throughout most of 
the world, even in countries within the Communist orbit, it 
is claimed that representative government exists and that 
its existence is the principal moral claim to obedience. At 
least for a concerned and intelligent public, it is perhaps 
not too much to conclude that respect for government 
depends on the degree to which reality matches claim. 



ILLUSTRATIONS BY HOWARD BEHRENS 



18 



the Maryland Magazine 



Inside Maryland SpOrtS by tieilU Bar, Director of Sports Information 



r n 



IE TERRAPIN BASKETBALL TEAM ENDED 1111 Rl (.1 1 \l< 

season with an 8-12 record and finished in a sixth 
place tie with South Carolina in the Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference. Not a great season but certainly more wins than 
most observers thought the Terps would get this season. 

The Terps lacked bench strength this season mostly due 
to academic deficiencies. Much of the season Coach Bud 
Millikan had only eight members on the varsity squad. 

But don't be disheartened . . . let's look to the future 
. . . the freshman team closed the season with a 14-2 
record and Coach Millikan describes them as his best 
Maryland freshman squad . . . not only good on the floor 
but also good in the classroom. 

For what it's worth . . . 

I saw every conference freshman team and I think the 
Tcrp frosh are as good or better than any frosh squad I 
saw. 

The five freshmen starters averaged in double figures. 
Neil Brayton of Youngstown, Ohio, ended with a 20.6 
scoring average, Gary Ward of Washington, D. C, closed 
with a 20.1 scoring average, Jack Clark of Beverly, Ohio, 
had a 16.6 average, Rich Wise of Wilmington, Delaware, 
averaged 13.4 per game, and Mike DeCosmo of Camden, 
New Jersey, rounded out the starters with a 12.1 average. 

Wise is 6-8, Ward stands 6-5, Brayton and Clark stand 
6-4 and DeCosmo is a tall 5-10. The team averaged over 
93 points a game this season, going over the century mark 
five times. 

To give you an idea of the frosh's superb play ... if 
their statistics were placed on a national level they would 
be second in scoring average (93.4) and fourth in free 
throw percentage (.753). 

Clark finished with 72 for 79 from the charity stripe and 
a .911 percentage, good enough for a third place finish 
nationally on the varsity level. 

Some skeptical fans might point out that the competition 
was not strong but let's face the facts and see that this 
frosh team handily defeated each team on the schedule 
with the exception of Navy's Plebes and as most of you 
know the Plebes are usually tough in Annapolis. 

Also, the competition is the same that Terp frosh have 
been playing for years, not usually coming up with this 
fine a record. 



I inning 10 swimming .. . ( oach Bill ( ampbell anil Ins 
ime swimming squad won a couple ol big non conference 
meets with Navy and Pittsburgh, Unfortunately Coach 

Campbell came down with the llu (Asian. I uropean, 01 
one of those hugs) and couldn't make the DIOSl important 
trip of the year: the trip to North ( aiohna and North 
Carolina State. Result . . . the Terps lost both meets as 
they were both decided in the last event. 

Not saying Coach Campbell's absence was the reason 
for the losses but it certainly didn't help matters. 

The Terp wrestling team dominated the Atlantic ( oasl 
Conference again this season, keeping its undefeated 
Conference record intact, (oach Sully Krause and his top 
notch squad also won a couple ol important non-con- 
ference matches . . . the victims were Navj and Army. 

It looks funny to type Navy before .Army but. as you 
know, the Middies rank well ahead of the Cadets in im- 
portance to Terp athletic squads. 

In indoor track the big news this winter has been pole 
vaulter John Belitza. The Perms drove senior was the first 
collegian to vault over the lb foot mark when he ac- 
complished the feat in the Boston AA games. 

The article "Born of Fire" in the last issue of The 
Maryland Magazine caught my attention. You remember it 
was about the founding of the first fraternity at College 
Park. One of the founding eight members was E. E. 
Powell, described as the "Father of Lacrosse" at Mary- 
land. I asked Dave Brigham if he had any pictures of 
the first lacrosse team and he came up with the one 
pictured below. We publish the picture as a reminder that 
lacrosse has been a sport at Maryland for quite a while— 
since 1910. 

I hope you will clip out the Maryland Spring Sports 
Schedule published on the inside cover and that you'll 
be coming out to attend some of our contests. All of the 
home contests — baseball, golf, tennis and outdoor track — 
may be attended without admission fee. Tickets for home 
lacrosse games go for a dollar each and may be purchased 
only at the gate. 

Spring football begins April 8 and will end with the 
annual alumni-varsity clash. May 11. I'll be giving you 
the inside story on 1963 football in the next issue. 

See you in May! 



Standing Left to Right: un- 
known, E. MONTELL, N. 
JOHNSTON, W. C. STEVENS, 
R. V. TRUITT, L. R. ROGERS, 
L. G. WILLSON. 

Kneeling Left to Right: J. J. 

TULL, W. H. WAXTER, E. 
TRIMBLE, B. A. FORD, H. 
FREUNDLICH, L. CARPENTER, 
C H. BUCHWALD. 

Seated Left to Right: M. E. 

DAVIS, MCKENNA, H. MASSEY, 
E. E. POWELL, T. D. GRAY, 
J. B. COSTER, R. J. MC- 
CUTCHEON. 




March-April, 1963 



19 



Alumni and 
Campus Notes 

i ONTINUED FROM PAGE 13 

300, included students, their parents and 
friends, members of the fraternities, 
sorority, interested alumni and faculty 
members. 

President Sam A. Goldstein welcomed 
the guests and Milton A. Friedman 
served as master of ceremonies. Dean 
Noel E. Foss expressed appreciation for 
the work done by the Alumni Asso- 
ciation. 

Entertainment consisted of seven skits 
and three individual presentations by 
undergraduate students, under the super- 
vision of Dr. Frank J. Slama, Executive 
Secretary of the Alumni Association. 

Judges were past presidents of the 
Alumni Association, James P. Cragg, 
Jr., Irving I. Cohen and Victor H. Mor- 
genroth, Jr. Two first money prizes 
were awarded to the Newman Club and 
to The Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity, 
and a third cash prize to the Lambda 
Kappa Sigma Sorority. The first indi- 
vidual money prize was awarded to 
Miss Jeanne Baker and the second to 
M. Neal Jacobs. 

Skits were also presented by the Rho 
Pi Phi Fraternity, the Phi Delta Chi 
fraternity, the Jungleaires and the Class 
of 1864. 

The Frolic committee consisted of 
Milton A. Friedman, Robert Kokoski, 
Milton Brownstein and Solomon Weiner. 

Members of the Place and Arrange- 
ments Committee were Irving B. Ep- 
stein, Chairman, S. Lawrence Rosen- 
bloom, Vice-Chairman, Jerome Stiff- 
man, Morris Rockman, and Mrs. Sam 
A. Goldstein, who arranged for re- 
freshments, assisted by members of the 
Alumni Association and the Travelers' 
Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharma- 
ceutical Association. 



Subscribe to 

MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



To Conserve 
the Land 



The following excerpted remarks from 
an address by Dr. T. B. Symons, mem- 
ber of the Board of Regents, are pre- 
sented here because of their general 
value and application. The address was 
delivered this past winter before the 
Maryland Association of Soil Conserva- 
tion Districts and the State Soil Con- 
servation Committee. 



NEVER HAS CONSERVATION OF OUR 
natural resources been more im- 
portant and vital to our State and 
Nation than today. Land is growing 
more valuable each day, and the pro- 
tection of our soil and the preserva- 
tion of our water resources has ar- 
rested the attention of all our people 
both rural and urban and the highest 
administrative officials in our Nation. 
The increase of our population and 
the transfer of many city residents to 
adjoining suburban areas throughout 
the eastern seaboard and especially 
in our State enlists the active interest 
of city folks who are seeking the wide 
open country as a way of life. So, 
my friends, you are engaged in direct- 
ing a noble work when encouraging 
everyone to think of preserving our 
natural resources. Professor Robert 
R. Humphrey has just written a book 
entitled, Range Ecology. In its intro- 
duction he says. 

No one owns land in a 
permanent sense. We may 
hold temporary title to one 
acre or a thousand, but this 
is at best a temporary title. It 
does not carry with it the 
right to exploit or despoil the 



vegetation or other natural 
resources of that land. The 
welfare of the nation and, in 
a larger sense, of the world 
depends on the welfare of all 
the scattered areas that make 
up this land upon which we 
depend for our very life. All 
of us, therefore, should do 
the little we can to see that 
the acre over which we hold 
temporary custodianship is 
passed on to the next user 
with its natural resources as 
well or better conserved than 
when it fell into our hands. 

. . . We need greater education on 
the part of our rural population as 
well as the general public. I quote 
from a recent news statement from 
the University of Maryland College 
of Agriculture: titled "Careers in 
Agriculture." 

In no other country, and at 
no other time in our history, 
has agriculture provided so 
well for so many people as it 
does in the United States to- 
day. Agriculture is as vital 
as ever to the economy, well- 
being, and strength of our 
nation. 

We have grown from a 
nation in which one of every 
four workers had to produce 
food, to a nation in which one 
farmer is efficiently producing 
food for 27. 

Unfortunately, though, 
there seems to be a distinct 
misunderstanding of agri- 
culture on the part of the 
general public ... its relation 
to the well-being, growth, and 



ft 



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Sjliotul Poll 

OCCIDENTAL 

Where Staleimen Dine 

1411 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. 

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Open Daily & Sunday 11:30 A.M. -1:00 A.M. 
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Five Beautifully Appointed Roomi Caterinq To Partial, Meetinqi And Banqueti Accommodatinq 10 To 250 Pt 

E»tabliihed For Over 100 Yean 



20 



the Maryland Magazine 



even to the security of the 
United States. American ag- 
riculture is big business, with 
assets of $207 billion — nearly 
two-thirds of the market value 
of all corporation stocks on 
the New York Stock Ex- 
change, or three-fourths of 
the value of current assets of 
all corporations in the U. S. 
Agriculture is this country's 
biggest industry. 

In its broad concept, U. S. 
Agriculture consists of three 
separate segments: (1) some 
seven million farmers are 
directly engaged in the pro- 
duction of crops and live- 
stock; (2) suppliers and 
others rendering services to 
farmers involve some six mil- 
lion persons; (3) those who 
process, store, handle, trans- 
port, and merchandise farm 
products account for approx- 
imately ten million employed 
persons. Together, these three 
groups account for almost 35 
percent of the total U. S. 
labor force. 

For almost a century, land- 
grant colleges were concerned 
primarily with training stu- 
dents for agricultural produc- 
tion. Today's agriculture, with 
its modern technology, re- 
quires educational programs 
not only for those who will 
engage in farming, but also 
for the many more that will 
seek their careers in the in- 
dustries and businesses related 
to agriculture. 

With the increased demand 
for scientific, technical, and 
educational research and de- 
velopment, college students as 
well as others may well look 
to the field of agriculture for 
interesting jobs which offer 
attractive salary, security and 
working hours — all desirable 
benefits. 



Seniors Present 
Peter, Paul, Mary 

The Senior Class of the University will 
present the folk-singing trio, Peter, Paul 
& Mary, between 8:30 and 10:30 p.m. 
on April 27 at the Cole Activities Field 
House. 

Choice seats are being reserved for 
alumni, who may purchase tickets for 
$2.50 each by sending the money and 
an enclosed self-addressed envelope to 
Alumni Tickets, Post Office Box 80, 
College Park, Maryland. Tickets will 
also be on sale on campus and at the 
door. Profits will be given to the Mc- 
Keldin Library. 



Through 

The 

Years 



1895-1919 

Curtis C. McDonnell, Agr. '95, 
died at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda 
on December 15, 1962, of a heart 
attack. He had served 38 years with the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture until 
his retirement in 1945. Mr. McDonnell 
was 87. 

Charles Jerningham Queen, Agr. 
'97, died of a stroke on January 14. 
1963, in Brooklyn, New York. Mr. 
Queen led an active life, spending 33 
years on the New York City Police De- 
partment. He was 87. 

Dr. James G. Matthews, m.d. '05, 
is retired from the practice of medicine. 
He is living in Spokane, Washington. 

Dr. Roger W. Williams, d.d.s. '08, 
is a retired dentist. Dr. Williams lives 
in Arlington, Virginia. 

Dr. Gail W. Kahle, m.d. '10, is a 
physician and surgeon living in Marien- 
ville, Pennsylvania. 

Frank J. Maxwell, Agr. '10, is em- 
ployed in a general grocery store. He 
lives in Baltimore. 

Dr. Walter Michael Winters, m.d. 
'10, is retired from the practice of 
medicine. He lives in Paterson, New 
Jersey. 

Moses Wiesenfeld Rosenfeld, 
i.l.b. '14, is a lawyer and partner in the 
firm of Blades and Rosenfeld. He lives 
in Baltimore. 

Dr. James H. Samuel, d.d.s. 14, is 
retired from the practice of dentistry. 
Dr. Samuel and his wife live in Lake 
Worth, Florida. 

Harold Tshudi, ll.b. '14, is a partner 
in the law firm of Semmes, Bowen and 
Semmes. Mr. Tshudi lives in Baltimore. 
He has one daughter. 

Dr. Harley D. Drake, Sr., m.s. 17. 
died on December 15, 1962, in Ohio, 
after a short illness. Dr. Drake devoted 
his life to the education and service of 
the deaf. He was 80 years old. 

Ferdinand A. Korfe, A&S '17. is 
the Director of the Bureau of Food 
Control for the Baltimore City Health 
Department. Mr. Korff lives in Balti- 
more. He has one daughter. 

Dr. Charles Roberts Thomas, m.d. 
'17, is a practicing physician in Chat- 
tanooga, Tennessee. He has two chil- 
dren. His son William is also a doctor. 

(Continued on next page) 




"And let's talk about 
your future'' 

Most engineers want the same things: good 
pay, stability and, if you're the kind of fellow 
we like to talk to, you want assignments that 
stir your mind. 

GOOD PAY. Where do you stand in the 

educational and experience tables? You'll 
earn accordingly. 

STABILITY. For 77 years Westinghouse 
has been a leader in the scientific field, and 
our far-flung projects have attracted many 
outstanding scientists and engineers. 

STIMULATING ASSIGNMENTS. At 

Westinghouse you'll find research and devel- 
opment projects in molecular electronics, bi- 
onics, optical physics, Pulse Doppler Radar, 
LASER, advanced weapons systems and 
other challenging fields. 

Pull up a chair . . . and let's have a heart 
to heart talk about your future. 

To arrange an interview call SOuthfield 
1-1000, Ext. 657 or send resume to: 

Mr. L. W. Henderson 
DEPT. 404 



Westinghouse 



DEFENSE CENTER 
BALTIMORE 

P. 0. Box 1693, 

Baltimore 3, Md. 

Air Arm Ordnance 

Electronics Systems 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 




w 



March- April, 1963 



21 



VICTOR CUSHWA & SONS 


MANUFACTURERS OF "CALVERT" COLONIAL FACE BRICK 


Main Office and Plant 


WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 


Office and Warehouse 


137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. WASHINGTON, D. C. 


701 N. ROYAL ST. ALEXANDRIA, VA. 


Sales Representatives In Principal Eastern Cities 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 
5-3000 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

SAND & 

GRAVEL 

RE 
5-3000 








WASHINGTON 21, D.C. 







Q) erving 








THE PUBLIC OVER ONE HUNDRED YEARS ^g/ 


-Jke 


sponn 


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26th and SISSON STREETS 








BALTIMORE 11, MD. 








Phone BElmont 5-8600 




OLES 



ENVELOPE CORPORATION 



Jjallimore s 1 ioneer Onvelope ^Manufacturer 

Established 1912 

Office and Factory: 25th STREET & LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake 3-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 1500 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. 
Washington 5, I). C. 234-3979 



Mrs. John Paul Troy, Nurs. '17. is 
retired from nursing. Mrs. Troy has 
been very active in nursing organiza- 
tions and is the past President of the 
Baltimore Alumni Club of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. Mrs. Troy lives in 
Baltimore. 

Albert H. Sellman, Engr. 17, is 
retired and living in Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Nathan Dubroff, d.d.s. '19, 
died on June 22, 1962. He is survived 
by his wife of Kew Gardens, New York. 



1920-1929 

George M. Merrill, Agr. '20, is 
with the U. S. Engineer Corps. Mr. 
Merrill and his wife live in Kansas City, 
Missouri. 

Dr. Edward C. Morin, d.d.s. '20, is 
a practicing dentist specializing in oral 
surgery. Dr. Morin lives in Pawtucket, 
Rhode Island, and has one daughter. 

Dr. William J. B. Orr, m.d. '20, 
is a retired surgeon. He is currently 
living in Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Harry A. Silberman, d.d.s. '23, 
is in the general practice of dentistry. 
Dr. Silberman has one daughter and 
five grandchildren. He lives in Ridge- 
field, New Jersey. 

J. Vernon Lemmert, ll.b. '22, is 
the Comptroller for the Maryland Port 
Authority. Mr. Lemmert and his wife 
live in Baltimore. They have one daugh- 
ter. 

Dr. B. M. Rhodes, m.d. '22, is the 
physician for Florida State University. 
Dr. Rhodes has two children and lives 
in Tallahassee, Florida. 

Clarence D. Sasscer, Engr. '22, is 
a Supervisory General Engineer with 
the Corps of Engineers. He lives in 
Arlington, Virginia, and has three chil- 
dren. 

Anna Elizabeth Pratt, Nurs. '23, is 
a general staff nurse. Miss Pratt was a 
private duty nurse from 1923 to 1946. 
She is living in Baltimore. 

Frank A. Bennett, Engr. '23, is 
retired and living in Port Republic, 
Maryland. Mr. Bennett was formerly 
the Manager of the Specifications, Esti- 
mates and Standards Branch, Bureau of 
Yards and Docks of the Navy Depart- 
ment. 

Morris J. Gurevich, Agr. '23, is the 
president of Cherry Hill Mobile Homes, 
Inc. Mr. Gurevich lives in College Park, 
Maryland, and has two children. 

Dr. Arthur M. Kraut, m.d. '23, is a 
practicing physician. He and his wife 
live in Jersey City, New Jersey. They 
have two children. 

Dr. James T. Marsh, m.d. '24, died 
of cancer at his home in Westminster, 
Maryland, on January 4, 1963. Dr. 
Marsh had practiced medicine in West- 
minster for 38 years, and had been 
county medical examiner for 20 years. 
He was 68. 



22 



the Maryland Magazine 



Dr. Robert P. Siraka, A&S '24, is 
a Senior Bacteriologist with the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture. Dr. Straka 
received his PH.D. from Iowa State Uni- 
versity in 1938. He lives in Albany, 
California, and has two children. 

Dr. George J. Phillips, d.d.s. '25 
is in the general practice of dentistry. He 
lives in Baltimore, Maryland. He has 
one son, Dr. George J. Phillips, Jr. 

Arthur G. Prangi ey. Engr. '25, is 
the Vice President and Secretary of the 
Elastic Stop Nut Corporation of Amer- 
ica and the President of Buchanan 
Electrical Products Corporation. He re- 
ceived his law degree from George 
Washington University in 1931. He has 
one son and lives in Union, New Jersey. 

Dr. & Mrs. Cari M. Conrad, Agr. 
'25, A&S '26, live in New Orleans, 
Louisiana. Dr. Conrad is a Chief Re- 
search Chemist for the U. S. Department 
of Agriculture. They have three chil- 
dren. 

Hon. Lester L. Barrett, ll.b. '26, 
is a Judge of the Third Judicial Circuit 
ol Maryland. Judge Barrett and his 
wife live in Relay, Maryland. They have 
three children. 

Albert B. Fisher, Jr., Engr. '26, is 
a Chief Engineer with Koppers Com- 
pany, Inc. Mr. Fisher and his wife live 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They have 
one son. 

Dr. Frank Spano, m.d. '26, is a prac- 
ticing physician. He and his wife live in 
Union City, New Jersey. 

Dr. E. Irving Baumgartner, A&S 
'27, m.d. '31, is a practicing physician. 
Dr. and Mrs. Baumgartner live in Oak- 
land, Maryland. 

Carroll S. Brinsfield, Agr. '27, is 
the Chief of the Division of Food Con- 
trol of Maryland State Department of 
Health. Mr. Brinsfield lives in Towson, 
Maryland. He has one son. 

Harry J. Kelchner, A&S '27, is a 
Sales Representative for the New Jersey 
Zinc Company. He has two children and 
lives in Chatham, New Jersey. 

Dr. Benjamin Lavine, d.d.s. '28, is 
a practicing dentist. He and his wife 
live in Trenton, New Jersey. 

Dr. Ralph Mostwill, m.d. '28, is in 
private practice specializing in surgery 
and gynecology. He and his wife live 
in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Ellwood R. Nicholas, Educ. '28, is 
operating a motel in St. Augustine, 
Florida, where he lives with his wife. 

Robert L. Palmer, Engr. '28, is a 
Consultant with Mandrell Industries. 
Mr. Palmer lives in Houston, Texas. He 
has one daughter. 

Mortimer M. Slatkin, ll.b. '29 is 
a practicing lawyer. He lives in Steven- 
son, Maryland. Mr. Slatkin has two 
children. 

Charles H. Caldwell, Engr. '29, is 
a Sales Engineer for the General Electric 
Company. Mr. Caldwell lives in Grand 
Rapids, Michigan. He has three chil- 
dren. 

(Continued on next page) 




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Students Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

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23 



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Dr. Phillip Paul Cohen, m.d. '29 
is a practicing physician. He lives in 
Snow Hill, Maryland. Dr. Cohen has 
three children. 

Emmett T. Loane, Engr. '29, is a 
District Sales Manager for the C. & P. 
Telephone Company. Mr. Loane lives 
in Baltimore, Maryland. He has two 
children. Mr. Loane is currently serving 
on the Alumni Council of the Alumni 
Association. 



1930-1939 

William L. Lucas, A&S '30, is the 
Secretary and Treasurer of the Martin 
Marietta Corporation. Mr. Lucas lives 
in Baltimore, Maryland. He has one 
daughter. 

R. Duncan Clark, A&S '30, died of 
a stroke at Suburban Hospital on Jan- 
uary 3, 1963. Mr. Clark was a former 
member of the Maryland Legislature 
and a Montgomery County attorney. He 
received his law degree from Harvard 
in 1933. Mr. Clark was 54. 

Grafton D. Rogers, ll.b. '30, is a 
practicing attorney. He and his wife are 
currently living in Baltimore, Maryland. 

John Paul Allen, A&S '31, is the 
Operations Superintendent for a petro- 
leum refining company. He has two 
children and lives in Baltimore, Mary- 
land. 

John R. M. Burger, Jr., Engr. '31, 
is a Forecasting Engineer for the Poto- 
mac Edison Company. He is also a part- 
time math teacher at Hagerstown Jr. 
College. Mr. Burger lives in Hagerstown 
and has one daughter. 

Mr. & Mrs. Edwin M. Gue, Engr. 
'31, H.Ec. '35, are living in Indianapolis, 
Indiana. Mrs. Gue is the former Ruth 
Burslem. Mr. Gue is the Vice President 
of the Engineering Public Service Com- 
pany of Indiana. The Gues have twin 
daughters. 

Dr. Robert F. Rohm, m.d. '31, is a 
practicing doctor specializing in Oph- 
thalmology. Dr. Rohm lives in Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. He has three chil- 
dren. 

Dr. Miguel Alonso, m.d. '32, is a 
practicing physician specializing in ear, 
nose and throat. Dr. Alonso has two 
sons and lives in Santruce, Puerto Rico. 

C. Warren Bogan, Engr. '32, is a 
self-employed consulting engineer and 
the owner of C. Warren Bogan and 
Associates, Consulting Engineers. Mr. 
Bogan lives in Bethesda, Maryland. He 
has five children. 

Frederick W. Inverniz/i. A&S '32, 
is the Director, Administrative Office 
of the Courts and Lecturer at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Law School. Mr. 
Invernizzi received his law degree from 
the University in 1935. He lives in 
Baltimore and has two daughters. 



24 



the Maryland Magazine 



Dr. Richard A. Bailey, d.d.s. '33, is 

a practicing dentist. He lives in New 
Haven, Conn. Dr. Bailey has two 
daughters. 

Lester Leroy Bennett, Pharm. '33, 
is the owner of Bennett's Drug Store in 
Miami, Florida. Mr. Bennett has one son 
and lives in Hialeah, Florida. 

Claude A. Burkert, Educ. '33, is 
the Principal of Baltimore Polytechnic 
Institute. Mr. Burkert has two daughters. 
He lives in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Guy Watson Gienger, Agr. '33. is 
an Associate Professor of Agricultural 
Engineering. He lives in West Hyatts- 
ville. Mr. Gienger has two sons. 

Erna Mae Behrend, H.Ec. '34, is 
a Clinic Nutritionist at the Medical 
College of Virginia. Miss Behrend lives 
in Richmond, Virginia. 

Harry T. Kelly, Engr. '34, is the 
Vice President of the Equitable Invest- 
ment Corporation. He is in charge of 
Multi-Family Division and Urban Re- 
development. Mr. Kelly has five chil- 
dren and lives in Columbus, Ohio. 

Dr. Benjamin I. Siegel, m.d. '34, 
is a physician and the attending surgeon 
at North Charles General Hospital in 
Baltimore. Dr. Siegel lives in Pikes- 
ville, Maryland. He has two children. 
His daughter, Tamara, is an alumna of 
the University. 

Theodore McGann, BPA '34, is a 
Certified Public Accountant. Mr. Mc- 
Gann has one son and lives in Falls 
Church, Virginia. 

Herbert M. Allison, A&S '35, is 
the Personnel Policy and Benefits Man- 
ager for the J. C. Penney Company. Mr. 
Allison lives in New York City. He has 
two sons. 

Wilson Francis Dawson, Agr. '35, 
is a Plant Quarantine Inspector for the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. Mr. 
Dawson lives in Arlington, Virginia. He 
has two children. 

Charles G. Grosh, Engr. '35, is 
the Assistant Chief of the Installation 
and Materiel Division of the Federal 
Aviation Agency in Los Angeles, Cal- 
ifornia. Mr. Grosh lives in Pacific 
Palisades, California. He has two daugh- 
ters. 

Dr. Walter Lichtenberg, m.d. '35. 
is a practicing physician. Dr. Lichten- 
berg lives in Westwood, New Jersey. 
He has two daughters. 

Carlotta A. Hawley, d.d.s. '36, 
is a practicing dentist specializing in 
orthodontics. Dr. Hawley lives in Wash- 
ington, D. C. She is married to Horace 
Elwell Johnston. 

W. Scott James, Agr. '36, is a 
Product Manager in the Nitrogen Prod- 
ucts Division of the W. R. Grace & 
Company. Mr. James lives in Memphis, 
Tennessee. He has two children. 

Dr. Walter E. Karfgin, m.d. '36, is 
in the private practice of medicine. 
Dr. Karfgin lives in Baltimore, Mary- 
land. He has one daughter. 

(Continued on next page) 



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March-April, 1963 



25 



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Mrs. Jean Rowland Lowe, Educ. 
'36, is a housewife living in San Jose, 
California. She has one son. Mrs. Row- 
land has been a teacher and Methodist 
Church Missionary to China and Japan 
in Rural Work. 

Dr. Emanuel S. Ellison, m.d. '37, 
is a practicing physician and surgeon. 
Dr. Ellison lives in Baltimore, Mary- 
land. He has two daughters. His daugh- 
ter Aria is a senior in the University's 
School of Nursing. 

Frank B. Keech, ll.b. '37, is the 
Regional Claims Manager for the Glens 
Falls Insurance Company. Mr. Keech 
has four children. One son is attending 
the University. The Keeches live in 
Glens Falls, New York. 

Dr. Thomas G. Abbott, m.d. '37, 
is in the general practice of medicine. 
Dr. Abbott lives in Baltimore, Maryland. 
He has three children. 

Eunice E. Burdette, Educ. '37, is 
an elementary school supervisor for 
Prince George's County. Miss Burdette 
lives in Bowie, Maryland. 

John A. McLean, Engr. '37, is a 
design engineer with Westinghouse Elec- 
tric Corporation. Mr. McLean lives in 
Columbus, Ohio. He has two sons. 

Mrs. Bernice Grodjesk Bedrick, 
Agr. '38, is a science teacher. She has 
two children and lives in Linden, New 
Jersey. 

Dr. Kenneth E. Hamlin, Jr., ph.d. 
'38, has been named 1963 chairman of 
the American Chemical Society's Divi- 
sion of Medicinal Chemistry. Dr. Ham- 
lin is the Director of Research for 
Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Charles L. Benton, BPA '38, is 
the Budget Director for the city of 
Baltimore. Mr. Benton lives in Hyatts- 
ville, Maryland. He has three children. 

Thomas C. Brown, A&S '38, is a 
practicing lawyer. Mr. Brown received 
his law degree from the University in 
1950. He lives in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Dr. Edwin D. Cruit, d.d.s. '38, is 
in the general practice of dentistry. Dr. 
Cruit is living in Aberdeen, Maryland. 
He has three children. 

Dr. James P. Kerr, Jr., m.d. '39, 
is in the general practice of medicine. 
Dr. Kerr lives in Damascus, Maryland. 
He has two children. 

John D. Munks, Engr. '39, has re- 
cently been appointed Vice President of 
the Charles H. Tompkins Company, 
building contractors. 

Dr. Phillip J. Wingate, m.a. '39, 
ph.d. '42, has been named Assistant 
General Manager of Du Pont Com- 
pany's elastomer chemicals department. 

Mrs. Lolah Harrington Marshai l 
Mihm, Nurs. '39, is an Assistant Direc- 
tor of Nursing Service. Mrs. Mihm lives 
in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Mrs, Dorothy Dennis Orem, A&S 
'40, is a housewife in Hyattsville, Mary- 
land. She has one daughter. Mrs. Orem 



The gathering place for 
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DUKE ZEOBERT'S 

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1722 L Street 

(Two doors west of Conn. Ave.) 

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Open 'til Midnight — Sunday 'til 10 p.m. 




26 



the Maryland Magazine 



RESIDENTIAL IRON WORK 



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SINCE 



1933 



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served as an officer for seven years in 

the Navy from 1942. 

Dr. Aki ih r Edgar Poi i <>< k. m.d 
'40, is a practicing physician Dr. 
Pollock has two sons and lives in Al- 
toona, Pennsylvania. 

Philip L. Shepsle. A&S '38, is a 
store manager for Top Value Stamps 
He has three children and lives in 
Takoma Park. Maryland. 



1940-1949 

Gardner H. Storks. Engr. '40. is a 
Croup Engineer in the Electronics S\s- 
tem and Products Division of the Martin 
Marietta Corporation of Baltimore. Mr. 
Storrs lives in Baltimore. He has three 
sons. 

Franklin K. Peacock, BPA '41, is 
the Division Accounting Manager of 
the Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone 
Company. Mr. Peacock has four chil- 
dren. He lives in Annapolis, Maryland. 

Dr. Irene Phrydas, m.d. '41, is a 
physician. She is with the Department 
ot Psychiatry of Emory University in 
Emory, Georgia. Dr. Phrydas is married 
to D. T. Papageorge and has two daugh- 
ters. She lives in Atlanta, Georgia. 

Dr. George Reusch, d.d.s. '41. is 
in the general practice oi dentistry. Dr. 
Reusch lives in Cranford, New Jersey. 
He has three children. 

Ralph W. Frey, Jr., BPA '41, has 
been appointed general chairman of the 
1963 Cancer Crusade in Washington, 
D. C. Mr. Frey is the Assistant Vice 
President for Personnel of the Chesa- 
peake and Potomac Telephone Com- 
pany. He lives in Takoma Park, Mary- 
land. Mr. Frey has three children. 

Charles A. Shivoder, Jr., Engr. '41. 
is the president of a general contracting 
firm. He has one son and lives in 
Towson, Maryland. 

Dr. Frank L. Bentz, Jr., Agr. '42, 
is Assistant to the President of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Dr. Bentz re- 
ceived his ph.d. from the University in 
1952. He lives in Silver Spring, Mary- 
land. Dr. Bentz has three children. 

Edward W. Nylen, BPA '42, is an 
attorney and partner in the firm of 
Nylen, Gilmore and Simpson. Mr. Nylen 
received his law degree from George 
Washington University in 1947. He has 
two children and lives in Hyattsville, 
Maryland. 

Dr. Eli Galitz, m.d. '43, is a prac- 
ticing physician. Dr. Galitz lives in 
Hialeah, Florida. He has three sons. 

Dr. Ruth E. W. Baldwin, m.d. '43. 
is an Assistant Professor in Pediatrics 
and Director of Clinics for Exceptional 
Children. Dr. Baldwin lives in Balti- 
more, Maryland. She has four sons. 

Norman M. Glasgow, BPA '43, is 
a partner in the law offices of Wilkes 
and Artis. Mr. Glasgow received his 
law degree from George Washington 

(Continued on next page) 



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March-April, J 963 



27 



McLeod & Romborg 

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BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVIUE, MD. WArfleld 7-0880 



University in 1949. He lives in Rock- 
ville, Maryland, and has three children. 

Edwin W. Inglis, Engr. '43, has been 
named Assistant Manager of the Mar- 
keting Development Division of the 
Standard Oil Company of New Jersey. 
Mrs. Inglis is the former Elizabeth 
Chamberlain who also attended the 
University. They have three children 
and live in Riverside, Connecticut. 

Joseph John Thomas, BPA '44, is 
an Assistant Sales Manager for Sears, 
Roebuck and Company. Mr. Thomas 
lives in Elmhurst, Illinois. He has two 
sons. 

Mrs. Jeanne Adams Wilson, Nurs. 
'44, is a housewife living in Jacksonville, 
Illinois. Mrs. Wilson has three sons and 
two daughters. 

Dr. Conrad L. Inman, Jr., d.d.s. '44, 
is a practicing dentist specializing in 
oral surgery. Dr. Inman has three chil- 
dren. He lives in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Dr. Harry A. Kahn, Engr. '45, has 
been appointed Director of Research 
and Applications for U. S. I. Film Prod- 
ucts, new department of U. S. Indus- 
trial Chemicals Company. Dr. Kahn 
received his ph.d. from Penn State Uni- 
versity. He has five children and lives 
in Macedon, New York. 

Dr. Phillip Adams, A&S '45, is 
the Director of Research for the Berke- 
ley Chemical Corporation of Berkeley 
Heights, New Jersey. Dr. Adams re- 
ceived his ph.d. from Cornell in 1950. 
He lives in Murray Hill, New Jersey, 
and has three children. 

Mrs. Virginia Gibson Hohing, 
H.Ec. '45, is a housewife. Mrs. Hohing 
lives in Summit, New Jersey. She has 
three children. 

Dr. James A. Roberts, m.d. '46, is 
a practicing physician. Dr. Roberts lives 
in Silver Spring, Maryland. He has 
seven children. 

Dr. Frank A. Kiernan, d.d.s. '46, 
is a practicing dentist. Dr. Kiernan has 
five children. He lives in Stratford, 
Connecticut. 

Dr. Thomas R. McSparren, d.d.s. 
'46, is a practicing dentist. Dr. Mc- 
Sparren lives in Newport, Rhode Island. 
He has three sons. 

M. Gist Welling, Agr. '46, is on 
the faculty of the College of Agricul- 
ture. Mr. Welling lives in Adelphi, 
Maryland. He has two children. 

Dr. Irl Wentz, m.d. '46, is a prac- 
ticing physician. Dr. Wentz lives in 
Salisbury, North Carolina. He has 
three children. 

Marc G. Abribat, Engr. '47, is a 
Special Representative of the General 
Sales Department of the Ingersoll Rand 
Company. Mr. Abribat has three sons. 
He lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Elmer F. Bright, Educ. '47, is a 
teacher and coach. He is currently 
living in Timonium, Maryland. 

Dr. Boyd B. Cary, Jr., m.s. '47, is a 
physicist with the G. E. Space Tech- 



28 



the Maryland Magazine 



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nology Lab. Dr. Cary received his ph.d. 

from the University in 1954. He li\cs 
in Norristown, Pennsylvania, and has 
two sons. 

Frederic Orr Louden, BPA '47, is 
a practicing attorney. He received Ins 
law degree from the University in 1949. 
Mr. louden and his wife live in Bethes- 
da. Maryland. 

Ralph E. Pennywiii, BPA '48, is 
the Staff Manager in Accounting foi 
the International Minerals and Chem- 
ical Corporation of Bartow. Florida. 

Mr. Pennywitt lives in Lakeland, Flor- 
ida. He has two children. 

Major Hlnry A. SoHN, Agr. '4<S. 
is a Major in the U. S. Air Force. Major 
Sohn returned to the service in 1951 
after serving in World War II until 
1945. He is stationed at Larson A.I .15.. 
Washington. He has four children. 

Maurice D. Starr, Engr. '48, is the 
Head of the Nuclear Power Division 
of the Bureau of Yards and Docks. 
Mr. Starr has three children. He lives 
in Silver Spring, Maryland. 

George W. Sullivan, i l.b. '48, is 
an attorney practicing in New York 
City. Mr. Sullivan lives in Summit, New 
Jersey. He has three children. 

LeRoy Bald, ll.b. '49, is a practic- 
ing lawyer in the firm of Childs and 
Bald. Mr. Bald lives in Annapolis, Mary- 
land. He has three children. 

Mrs. Alice C. Dwyer, Nurs. '49, 
is a Hospital Advisor for the Bureau 
of Medical Service of the State Health 
Department. Mrs. Dwyer holds the rank 
of Lt. Commander in the Navy and 
Captain in the U.S. Air Force. She 
earned her Flight Nurse Wings during 
the Korean Conflict. Mrs. Dwyer lives 
in Ellicott City, Maryland. 

John W. Bryan, Engr. '49, is an 
electronics and research engineer. He 
lives in Washington, D. C, and has 
three children. 



1950-1959 

Norris Elliott Felt, Jr., Engr. 
'50, is the General Manager, Program 
Review of the Martin Company. Mr. 
Felt lives in Towson, Maryland. He 
has two children. 

Ronald Utman, BPA '50, has been 
appointed Production and Control Man- 
ager of the Builders Hardware plant, 
Stanley Hardware Division. Mr. Utman 
lives in Newington, Connecticut. He has 
four children. 

Keith K. Kishbauch, p.e. '50, is the 
Department Head of Physical Educa- 
tion of Hammond High School in Alex- 
andria, Virginia. Mr. Kisbauch lives in 
Woodbridge, Virginia. He has two 
children. 

Ann Klingelhofer, Nurs. '50, is 
an Assistant Professor at Bcrea College 
in Kentucky. Miss Klingelhofer lives in 
Berea. 

(Continued on next page) 



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Norfhwood Shopping Ccnler, TU. 9-5551 




SALES • INSURANCE 

Near University of Maryland 

WArfield 7-1010 & 7-0321 
6037 Baltimore Boulevard 

RIVERDALE, MD. 



King Bros., Inc. 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

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208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2. MD. 



Bard-Avon School 

SECRETARIAL 

Complete secretarial training 

9 months 

Special and pre-collejje courses 

3 months and 6 months 

DRAMATIC ART AND RADIO 

1- or 2-year COtmet 

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March-April, 1963 



29 



Ottenberg's Bakers. 

Inc. 

Quality Bakers 
For Three Generations 




RESTAURANTS 



INSTITUTIONS 



Lincoln 7-6500 
Washington, D. C. 



J'eto^ dtudetdi and 
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head o^ both c&mpoMiei 

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Hyattsville, Md. 
WArfield 7-7200 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



Mrs. Marilyn Kuhn Lebo, BPA 
'50, is a housewife. Mrs. Lebo lives 
in Woodmere, New York. She has three 
children. 

Richard Lom Baker, Agr. '51, is 
the Manager for Tool Distributor Sales 
of the Ingersoll Rand Company. Mr. 
Baker has two children. He lives in 
Parrsippany, New Jersey. 

Joseph C. Watkins, BPA '51, recent- 
ly assumed duties as Contract Specialist 
in the Washington offices of the U. S. 
Agency for International Development. 
Mr. Watkins lives in Silver Spring, 
Maryland. He has three children. 

Dwight O. Coblentz, Educ. '51, is 
the Head Math Teacher at Glenbrook 
South High School. Mr. Coblentz lives 
in Glenview, Illinois. He has two sons. 

Louis W. Calbeck, BPA '51, is a 
Tax Law Specialist with the Internal 
Revenue Service. Mr. Calbeck has three 
children. He lives in McLean, Virginia. 

Dr. Donald Hammond Hobbs, d.d.s. 
'51, is a practicing dentist. Dr. Hobbs 
lives in Pikesville, Maryland. He has 
three children. 

George Agapios Kostas, Phar. '52, 
is the President of the Aracoma Drug 
Company. Mr. and Mrs. Kostas live 
in Logan, West Virginia. 

Charles E. Russell, Agr. '52, has 
been appointed Zone Personnel Manager 
of Sealtest Foods general office in 
Philadelphia. Mr. Russell lives in Wood- 
bury Heights, New Jersey. 

Harry Lieberman, Jr., Educ. '52, 
is a Director of Guidance. He and his 
wife live in Bowie, Maryland. 

Dr. Dale E. Lincicome, d.d.s. '52, 
is a practicing dentist. Dr. Lincicome 
lives in Seattle, Washington. He has 
four children. 

South Trimble Lynn, BPA '52, is 
the Secretary-Treasurer of Universal 
Floors, Inc., and Secretary-Treasurer of 
Bethesda Florist, Inc. Mr. Lynn has two 
children. He lives in Washington, D. C. 

Gerald L. Stempler, BPA '53, is 
the Executive General Manager of Sales 
and Service for a chain of industrial 
laundries. He lives in Silver Spring, 
Maryland. Mr. Stempler has four chil- 
dren. 

Bill Lee Yoho, ll.b. '53, is a prac- 
ticing attorney in the firm of Hoyert and 
Yoho of College Park. Mr. Yoho lives 
in College Park, Maryland. He has two 
children. 

Walter Zaharevitz, Mil. Sci. '53, 
retired from the Air Force on August 
31, 1962. He is currently a student and 
doctoral candidate at Syracuse Uni- 
versity. Mr. Zaharevitz lives in Syracuse, 
New York. He has five sons. 

Francis Peter Zurmuhlen, Agr. 
'53, is a commercial pilot for United 
Airlines. Mr. Zurmuhlen has five chil- 
dren. He lives in Alexandria, Virginia. 

David Lee Bowers, A&S '54, is a 
practicing attorney. Mr. Bowers received 
his law degree from the University in 
1961. He has three children and lives 
in Baltimore, Maryland. 




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600 Equitable Bldg. LE 9-5626 



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Insurance of all Kinds 

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4316 GALLATIN STREET 
Hyattsville, Md. 



30 



the Maryland Magazine 



Dr. J. F. Jenkins, Jr, PH.D. '54, has 
been elected Vice President in charge 
ot Advanced Concepts of the Interstate 
Electronics Corporation of Anaheim, 
California. 

Dr. Charles L. Brandenburg, Jr., 
d.d.s. '54, is a dentist in private practice. 
Dr. Brandenburg has four children. He 
lives in Rising Sun, Maryland. 

Jane Pennington Cahill, A&S '54, 
is the Manager of Recruitment in the 
Washington System Center of I.B.M. 
Miss Cahill lives in Washington, D. C. 

Wili.ard S. Cahill, BPA '54, is the 
Signed Articles Coordinator for the 
G. E. Company, Defense Programs Op- 
eration, Washington, D. C. Mr. Cahill 
has two daughters and lives in Sorinfield, 
Virginia. 

Ruth Travers Bennett, Educ. '55, 
is a second grade teacher at the Campus 
Elementary School at State Teachers 
College in Salisbury. Miss Bennett re- 
ceived her m.ed. degree from the Uni- 
versity in 1960. 

Monroe Joseph Cowan, A&S '55, is 
on the Technical Staff of Bell Tele- 
phone Laboratories, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. 
Cowan live in Murray Hill, New Jersey. 

Winfield Ware Dudley, BPA '55. 
is a Line Mechanic for United Airlines. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dudley live in Silver 
Spring, Maryland. 

Mr. and Mrs. David Daniel Eigen- 
brode, Agr. '55, H.Ec. '56, live in Fred- 
erick, Maryland. Mrs. Eigenbrode is the 
former Nancy E. Devilbiss. Mr. Eigen- 
brode is the Assistant County Agent 
for Frederick County. They have two 
children. 

Valerie E. Walker, H.Ec. '56, is 
a member of the editorial staff of Ladies 
Home Journal. Miss Walker has just 
won a 10-day trip for two to Monaco, 
given by the Chemstrand Company. 

Dr. Alva Morgan Golden, ph.d. 
'56, is a Nematologist with the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture. Dr. Golden 
lives in College Park. He has one son. 

Glenn Bertram Harten, A&S '56, 
is currently studying law at George 
Washington University. Mr. and Mrs. 
Harten live in Riverdale, Maryland. 
Mrs. Harten is the former Elaine M. 
Ecsery. 

Dr. Virgil Roy Hooper, m.d. '56, 
is a physician specializing in anethesiol- 
ogy. Dr. Hooper lives in Flint, Michigan. 

Robert C. Hur, A&S '56, is the 
Assistant to the Publisher of the Con- 
gressional Quarterly, Inc. Mr. Hur lives 
in Silver Spring, Maryland. He has one 
daughter. 

Francis M. Dreessen, Agr. '57, is 
an officer in the U. S. Navy. He lives in 
Lawrence, Kansas. Lt. Dreessen has 
three children. 

Valentin D. Dulay, A&S '57, is a 
property insurance underwriter. He lives 
in Hyattsville, Maryland. 

Andrew Dutkanych, Mil. Sci. '57, 
retired from the U. S. Army in 1962 
after 20 years of service. He is cur- 



rently managing a line jewelry depart- 
ment in a department store. Major 
Dutkanych has two children ami lives 
in Seymour. Connecticut. 

Major Frederick V. Bansi I w 
Mil. Sci. '57, is an officer in the U. S. 
Army. He has three children. His ad 
dress is APO 143, San Francisco. 

Charles P. Finn, Engr. '58, has 

joined Robertshaw-FllltOIl as branch 
manager for the company's Control 

S\ stems Division in the State of Vir- 
ginia. Mr. Finn lives in Richmond. Vir- 
ginia. He has three children. 

Richard L. Shocki ey, A&S '58, is 
the sales division manager of the 
Greensboro office of Snelling & Snelling, 
personnel consultants. Mr. Shockley 
lives in Greensboro. North Carolina. 
He has one daughter. 

Mrs. Eleanor Smith Crowe, H.Ec. 
'58, is a housewife. Mrs. Smith lives in 
Dickson, Tennessee. She has two chil- 
dren. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Mark Crow- 
ley, BPA '58, Educ. '58, live in Plains- 
boro. New Jersey. Mrs. Crowley is the 
former Joan Asay. Mr. Crowley is an 
International Representative for R.E.A. 
Express. They have one son. 

Dr. Albert S. Luiz, d.d.s. '58, is in 
the general practice of dentistry. He 
lives in Bedford, Massachusetts. Dr. 
Luiz has one son. 

Jerome Keller Farrell, A&S '59, 
is a television producer-director. He 
and his wife live in Washington, D. C. 

Robert Thayer Foster, Mil. Sci. 
'59, is a captain in the U. S. Air Force. 
Captain Foster lives in Wollaston, Mas- 
sachusetts. 

Gerald Goldberg, BPA '59, is a 
Supervisory Accountant with the U. S. 
General Accounting Office in Washing- 
ton, D. C. Mr. Goldberg lives in Silver 
Spring, Maryland. 

Walter K. Herr, Engr. '59, is a 
Sales Engineer for the Defense Products 
Division of the Trane Company. Mr. 
Herr lives in La Crosse, Wisconsin. He 
has one son. 

Major Wallace L. Hamilton, U.C. 
'59, is an Air Force officer. He is con- 
currently attending Air Command and 
Staff College, Air University, and 
George Washington University. His 
permanent address is Montgomery, 
Alabama. Major Hamilton has two sons. 



THE SIXTIES 

Major Jack L. Robertson, U.C. 
'60, is engaged in a 12-month course of 
instruction in the Thai language at the 
Language School, Presidio of Monterey, 
California. 

Major James A. Driscoll, U.C. '60, 
U. S. Army, recently completed the 
Armed Forces Staff College in Norfolk. 
Virginia. 

(Continued on next page) 



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Open Daily and Sunday 

lllh Slroct Entiono of 

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lllh ■■ E IH., N.W. Washington. DC 

NA 8 8140 



THANK YOU 


for using 


MACKE 


VENDING MACHINES 



The 

Washington Wholesale 
Drug Exchange, Inc. 

Retail Druggist 

Owned Wholesale 
Drug House 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



American Disinfectant Co. 

Pest Control Service And Products 
928 EYE STREET, N.W. 

Washington 1. D. C. NAtional 8-6478 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24, Md. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



March-April, 1963 



31 



Captain William A. Rathbone, 
BPA "60. U. S. Army, recently com- 
pleted the Aircraft Maintenance Offi- 
cer Course at the Transportation School, 
Fort Eustice, Virginia. 

Lt. Col. James A. Williams, U.C. 
"61, has been awarded the U. S. Air 
Force Commendation Medal in recog- 
nition of his meritorious performance 
of duty as operations staff officer at 
Ramstein A.F.B.. Germany. 

Dr. and Mrs. George F. Buchness, 
d.d.s. '61. A&S '56, live in Baltimore. 
Maryland. Dr. Buchness is a practicing 
dentist. Mrs. Buchness is the former 
Mary L. Howell. They have one son. 

Lt. Col. Henry L. Calder, Jr.. 
U.C. '61, is currently a Professor of 
Military Science at West Texas State 
College. Col. Calder lives in Canyon, 
Texas. He has three children. 

Robert J. Carson, ll.b. '61, is an 
Assistant United States Attorney, Dis- 
trict of Maryland. Mr. Carson has two 
children. He lives in Havre de Grace, 
Maryland. 

Dr. Carlos E. Girod, m.d. '61, is 



a first year resident in Internal Medicine. 
He and his wife live in Hato Rey, 
Puerto Rico. 

Captain Archibald E. Loeb, U.C. 
'61, recently completed the U. S. Air 
Force course for academic instructors 
at Maxwell A.F.B., Alabama. Captain 
Loeb has six children and lives in Nor- 
ristown, Pennsylvania. 

Major Fred C. Klevesahl, U.C. 
'61. U.S. Army, is engaged in the Com- 
mand and General Staff College course 
at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Lt. Col. Robert H. Prahler, 
U.C. '62, was recently awarded the 
U. S. Air Force Commendation Medal 
during a ceremony at Hickam A.F.B., 
Hawaii. 

Paul Westin, Engr. '62, is an Asso- 
ciate Engineer with Lockheed Missiles 
and Space Company in Sunnyvale, 
California. He is living in Santa Clara, 
California. 

Howard W. Stone, Jr., Engr. '62, 
is an Aerospace Technologist for NASA 
at the Langley Research Center. Mr. 
Stone lives in Hampton, Virginia. 



Dr. Henry A. B. Dunning 



Dr. Henry A. B. Dunning, Pharm., '97, 
died recently in Baltimore at the age of 
85. 

Dr. Dunning, who was Chairman of 
the Board of Hynson, Westcott & Dun- 
ning of Baltimore, served as President 
of the Maryland Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation in 1926 and was presented 
the first Honored Alumnus Award of 
the Alumni Association School of Phar- 
macy of the University of Maryland in 
1950. 

Dr. Dunning received his doctor of 
pharmacy degree in 1908 from the 
University of Maryland and took post 
graduate work at Johns Hopkins where 
he developed a number of original com- 



pounds and pharmaceutical products. 

Dr. Dunning served as President of 
the American Pharmaceutical Associ- 
ation in 1929-30. He was awarded the 
Remington Medal in 1926 and honorary 
degrees from a number of universities. 

The new School of Pharmacy Build- 
ing in Baltimore was dedicated in his 
honor in 1958 as "Dunning Hall," and 
his leadership resulted in the erection 
or the Kelly Memorial Buliding, also 
on the Baltimore campus. 

In addition to his wife, the former 
Ethel Adams, Dr. Dunning is survived 
by three sons, Dr. Charles A. Dunning, 
Dr. J. H. F. Dunning, and Dr. H. A. B. 
Dunning. 



Dr. W. Wayne Babcock 



Dr. W. Wayne Babcock, M.D. '93, 
who played a leading role in the de- 
velopment of spinal anesthesia in the 
United States and the introduction of 
steel wire sutures, died February 23 
at his home in Bala, a suburb of 
Philadelphia. He was 90. 

Dr. Babcock was head of the De- 
partment of Surgery at Temple Uni- 
versity School of Medicine for 40 years 
before he retired in 1943. While he 
was teaching at Temple, his students 
formed the Babcock Surgical Society in 
his honor. 

Dr. Babcock was perhaps the only 
man in the country ever to have earned 
M.D. degrees from three institutions — 
the University of Maryland, the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, and the old 
Medico-Chirurgical College. 



In 1954, Dr. Babcock was awarded 
the American Medical Association's 
Distinguished service gold medal, given 
annually to one physician in the United 
States. He was designated a master 
surgeon by the International College of 
Surgeons and held honorary degrees 
from Temple, Gettysburg, Ursinus and 
Villanova. He received the first dis- 
tinguished alumnus award given by the 
University of Maryland Medical School. 

Among Dr. Babcock's other contribu- 
tions was the introduction of operative 
techniques for cancer of the colon and 
pelvis, repair of hernia and repair of 
divided nerves. 

Survivors include his wife, the former 
Marion C. Watters; three daughters; 
and five grandchildren. 



Directory of Advertisers 



Acme Iron Works 27 

Alcazar 28 

American Disinfectant Co 31 

American Telephone and Telegraph 

Company Back Cover 

Anchor Post Products Co., Inc 25 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co., Inc 29 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn 24 

Baltimore Envelope Co 23 

Bard Avon School 29 

Bergmann's Laundry 28 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., Inc 29 

Bon Ton Food Products 23 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc 23 

Thomas E. Carroll & Son 26 

D. Harry Chambers, Opticians 27 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 22 

D.C. Ignition Headquarters. Inc 30 

Del Haven White House Motel 29 

Farmers Cooperative Assn 30 

J. H. Filbert Co 28 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn 26 

Fuller & d' Albert, Inc 29 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co 28 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 31 

Harvey Dairy 27 

Hotel Harrington 31 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc 

King Bros., Inc 29 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 26 

John D. Lucas Printing Company 22 

Lustine Chevrolet 30 

Macke Vending Machines 31 

Maria's Restaurant 28 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 27 

Modern Machinists Co 27 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc 28 

North Washington Press, Inc 28 

Norman Motor Company, Inc 24 

Occidental Restaurant 20 

Oles Envelope Corp 22 

Olney Inn 27 

Ottenberg's Bakers, Inc 30 

P'ark Transfer Co 30 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 31 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co., Inc 27 

Seidenspinner Realtor 29 

Shoreham Hotel 23 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 22 

Mrs. Smith's Colonial Baking Co 25 

Strayer College 30 

Student's Supply Store 23 

Sweetheart Bread 27 

Thomsson Steel Co., Inc. 24 

Vermont Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 29 

Wallop & Son, Insurance 24 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange Inc.. 31 

Westinghouse Electric Corp 21 

Perry O. Wilkinson 30 

Williams Construction Company, Inc 24 

J. McKenny Willis & Sons, Inc 24 

Windjammer Cruises 25 

York Wholesalers, Inc 25 

Duke Zeibert's Restaurant 26 



32 



the Maryland Magazine 



MARYLAND 


VARSITY LA< ROSSI S( Hi Dl I 1 


SPRING 


Date Opponent I « ation 
March 25 kenyon COLLEC1 Home 




27 c orni i i Home 


SPORTS SCHEDULE 


30 I'KIM 1 ION 

April 4 harvard Home 




6 Virginia Home 
11 m w hampshhu Home 




VARSITY BASEBALL SCHEDULE 


15 Di ki Away 

20 UNIVERSITY oi BALTIMOR] ffo/Ttt 


Date Opponent Location 

March 28 Syracuse Home 
29 Dartmouth Home 


27 NAVY /fitav 
May 4 army //<///;<• 

11 MARYLAND I.\( ROSSI CLUB Home 
14 PENN STATE Home 


April 1 harvard Home 


18 HOPKINS //<////(- 


4 Georgetown Away 
6 Connecticut Home 


HEAD COACHES: Jack Faber and Al Heagj 


9 navy Home 

12 south Carolina Home 

13 south Carolina Home 


Home Games begin at 3:00 P.M., Weekdays; 2:30 
P.M., Saturday; and 1 1 :00 A.M., May 11. 


15 clemson Home 

16 clemson Home 






19 duke Away 

20 wake forest Away 


VARSITY TENNIS SCHEDULE 


23 Virginia Away 

26 north Carolina Home 

27 north Carolina state Home 
29 penn state Home 


Date Opponent Location 


March 28 Syracuse Home 

29 NORTH CAROLINA STATE Home 


May 3 north Carolina Away 

4 NORTH CAROLINA STATE Away 

7 Georgetown Home 

10 duke Home 

11 wake forest Home 
14 Virginia Home 


April 6 penn state Home 

9 GEORGETOWN A Way 

19 wake forest Away 

20 north Carolina A way 

23 Virginia Home 

24 hopkins Away 


HEAD COACH: Jack Jackson 


27 navy Home 
30 duke Home 


Home Games begin at 2:30 P.M. 


May 3 south Carolina Home 




4 clemson Home 
9-10-11 A.c.c. tournament Chapel Hill, N.C. 




VARSITY GOLF SCHEDULE 


HEAD COACH: Doyle Royal 


Date Opponent Location 




March 25 m.i.t. Home 




April 1 clemson Away 


VARSITY OUTDOOR TRACK SCHEDULE 


2 south Carolina A way 

3 NORTH CALOLINA STATE Away 

6 Princeton Home 

9 Georgetown Home 

1 1 Hopkins Home 

22 wake forest Home 

23 north Carolina Home 
26 penn state Home 
30 duke Home 

May 4 navy Home 

6 Virginia Home 

10-11 a. c.c tournament U. of Virginia, 

Homestead, 
Hot Springs, Va. 


Date Opponent Location 


March 30 Florida relays Gainesville, Florida 

April 6 south Carolina relays 

Columbia, South Carolina 
13 DUKE Durham, North Carolina 

20 NORTH CAROLINA Home 

26-27 penn relays Philadelphia, Pa. 

May 4 navy Annapolis 

10-11 a.c.c Chapel Hill, N.C. 

25 d.c.a.a.u. Home 

May 31- 

June 1 i.c.4a New York, N.Y. 


HEAD COACH: Frank Cronin 


HEAD COACH: James Kehoe 




A board chairman talks about tomorrow's executives... 



The Bell System has always sought men who could keep 
telephone service constantly improving. Men with ex- 
ceptional engineering talent, men with equally outstand- 
ing managerial potential. Such men are widely sought 
on college campuses across the United States. And with 
the future of communications unfolding so rapidly, the 
search has intensified. 

But still there is the old question to be answered, 
''What kind of man handles a business challenge best?" A 
mid western college audience recently heard these comments 
in a talk by A.T.&T. Board Chairman, Frederick R. Kappel: 

"...We took the records of 17,000 college men in the busi- 
ness who could fairly be compared with each other, and, 
examining their records, sought the answer to the question: 
'To what extent does success in college predict success in 
the Bell System?'... 

". ..The results.. . 

". . • The single most reliable predictive indica tor of 
a col.lege graduate's success in the Bel l System is his 
rank in his graduating class. 

"A far greater proportion of high-ranking than low- 
ranking students have qualified for the large responsibil- 



ities While a relationship does exist between college 

quality and salary, rank in class is more significant . . . 

"...What about extracurricular achievement?... Men who 
were campus leaders reached our top salary third in slightly 
greater proportion than those who were not. But it is only 
real campus achievement that seems to have any signifi- 
cance. Mere participation in extracurricular goings-on 
does not... 

"...What we have here, as I said before, are some hints — 
rather strong hints — about where to spend the most time 
looking for the men we do want, the men with intelligence 
plus those other attributes that give you the feel, the sense, 
the reasonable confidence that they will make things move 
and move well They want to excel and they are deter- 
mined to work at it... 

"...Business should aspire to greatness, and search dili- 
gently for men who will make and keep it great..." 

Frederick R. Kappel, Chairman of the Board 
American Telephone and Telegraph Company 



j§y BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 

Owned by more than two million Americans 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 



Maryland Koom 
University of Maryl « I Library 
k Md 



magazine 




Volume XXXV Number Three • May-June 1963 



• The Alumni Return 

• The Carmichael Cup Goes to Maryland 

• Thoreau the Rebel 

• University Concludes Space 'Flight' Experimi n i 



#S$J$\> 



-/•v. 



f> 



cWWHElB 



% 



■ _ 




*» 



the 




magazine 



JVIfix*;yl«.ricl 




Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXV Number 3 

Tm Cover: The significance of this photograph is obvious. Ten men. 

graduates of the Class of 1913, Maryland Agricultural College, have gath 
ered at College Park for their Fiftieth Reunion. Members of this Golden 
Anniversary Class are, from left to right: J. Rowland Reichard, the Rever- 
end J. Philip H. Mason. George B. Morse. I mors \Y. Benson. Sr.. Harr\ 
W. Townshend, Edwin E. Powell. Charles M. White, Henrj P. Ames. 
Ernest Trimble, and Lea Willson. The Alumni Return." describing the 
events of the 1963 Alumni Day, begins on page two. □ The photograph 
to the left shows part o( the national press conference held at the Univei 
sity to announce information relating to an important Universit) experi- 
ment. See page seven and "University Concludes Space 'Flight 1 Experi- 
ment." n News that we have won for the second straight year, the 
Carmichael Cup, emblematic o\' athletic excellence in the Atlantic (oast 
Conference, is contained in a story on page 19. Q A special article dealing 
with Thoreau begins on page 14. □ And last, but not least, there are more 
than 250 items concerning individual alumni located throughout this issue, 
most of them concentrated in the "Through the Years" section. I he 

Editors wish to each reader a pleasant summer. 

ZL The Alumni Return 

/ University Concludes Space 'Flight' Experiment 

J Maryland Books and Authors 

1 1 The Alumni Diary 

1 Z* Alumni and Campus Notes 

1 H" Thoreau, the Rebel 

1 J/ The Carmichael Cup Goes to Maryland 

Z* \J Inside Maryland Sports 

Z* ± Through the Years 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 

HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 

LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

RICHARD W. CASE 

DR. WILLIAM B. LONG, M.D. 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 

WILLIAM C.WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
HARRY E. HASSLINGER '33, President 
DR. EDWARD STONE, JR., '25, Vice-President 
MRS ERNA RIEDEL CHAPMAN, '34, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFIC E OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. BARBARA HARRIGAN, Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



ADVERTISING DIRECTORS 
MRS. H. B. GILLESPIE 

411 Range Road 

Baltimore 4, Md. 

828-9050 



RICHARD F. ROSS 
6136 Parkway Drive 
Baltimore 12. Md 
435-6767 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park, Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March3, 1879. -$3.00 per year-Fifty cents the copy-Memher of American Alumni Council. 






-$ ++ r 




the Maryland Magazine 




Uumni Return 



A l i MM in nil I HOI SANDS \ im 1 1 D nil II 
Matei foi a look al .1 great, growing university 
and in squeeze their emotions a bit with m< 
ories of their own and the University's past. 

The event was the traditional Alumni Day held in the 
Spring dI each scar; this yeai convened May II at < oll< 
Park. 

One alumnus, who had nol toured the grounds foi almost 
a decade, summed up the mood ol man) when he said: 

"I had intended to come to < ollege Park as an inten 
citizen and not as a sentimental alumnus worshipping 1 liv. 
days of his youth. I thought I would view the campus and 
the University with great practicality with an eye to what 
was happening to mj good tax dollars. 

"But when I sau this place with its towering buildings, 
its tremendous strength implied in the sweep ol the lawns, 
and its meat halls, and then I saw myself and a friend I 
had known in this perspective, I was very much moved. 
I really never realized how much of my heart was in this 
place, and how much of it always will he." 

A leisurely morning bracer of coffee greeted alumni in 
the registration area of the Student Union. There, alumni 
met to associate in two's and three's and then to join class 
meetings. 

The Golden Jubilee (lass, the 50-year veterans of the 
Class of 1913, were warmly greeted and became the center 
of considerable activity. Also in the spotlight were 23 
members of the (lass ol' 1938 who returned tor their 
25th reunion. The Spring reunion of the alumni of the 
College of Home Economics convened in the Maryland 
Room of the College. 

Mrs. E. V. McCollum. nutritionist and home economist, 
received the group's certificate of recognition. The certifi- 
cate was presented by Mrs. Erna Riedel ( hapman. '34. 
Vice President of the Alumni Association of the Universitj 
of Maryland. Joanne Moser, a June graduate of the Col- 
lege, received the outstanding senior award. 

Dean Selma Lippeatt spoke to the group of her experi- 
ences as consultant to the home economics program at the 
University of Caldas, Manizales, Colombia. She was fol- 
lowed by Professor T. Faye Mitchell, who spoke of her 
travels through the Pacific. 

Sports enthusiasts quickly headed for Byrd Stadium 
to watch Maryland get the best of the Maryland Lacrosse 
Club, by a score of 17-3. 

But the main body of alumni started through the line 
of an informal buffet luncheon at approximately 11:30 
a.m. For a brief time in their busy lives, many alumni 
were able to lunch at a leisurely pace, enjoying their com- 
panions and their food which featured Maryland ham and 
fried chicken as entrees. 

Some alumni met in business sessions and elected offi- 
cers. 

Alumni were spectators at the annual Spring football 
clash which, for the Maryland team, is the finishing action 
in their Spring football drills. This was an intra-squad 
game, extremely well matched, between the Free Staters 
and the Old Liners. The names are those o( major student 
political organizations. The Free Staters skimmed h\ the 
Old liners. 7-6. 

Over in Shipley Field, Maryland took it on the chin 
to a <zooa\ Wake Forest baseball team, 6-3. 



May-June, 1963 




Alumni who were headed toward "An Evening at the 
Union" were served an informal supper in the main cafe- 
teria of the Student Union, and then dispersed to enjoy 
the fine facilities of the center. These activities included 
bowling, billiards and card games. 

Those alumni who honored the University by their 
presence included the following: 

1913 

From the Class of 1913, celebrating its Fiftieth Re- 
union, were ten stalwarts. They were Henry "Pete" Ames 
of Arlington, Virginia; Emory W. Benson, Sr., of Cockeys- 
ville, Maryland; J. Philip H. Mason, Doswell, Virginia; 
George B. Morse, all the way from South Pasadena, Cali- 
fornia; Edwin E. Powell, Towson; J. Rowland Reichard, 
Hagerstown; Harry W. Townshend, Mitchellville; Ernest 
Trimble, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania; Charles M. White, 
Cleveland, Ohio; and Lea Willson, Bethesda. 

1918 
The Class of 1918 celebrating their forty-fifth year was 
represented by J. Homer Remsberg, Middlctown; and 
Mordecai Ezekiel, Washington, District of Columbia. 

1923 
Returning to participate in their 40th Anniversary with 
members of the Class of 1923 were Mrs. Mildred Bohar, 
nee Blandford, of Hyattsvillc; L. P. Downin of Alexandria, 
Virginia; C. W. England, Silver Spring; Austin A. Mc- 
Bride, of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania; A. G. Wallis, Cum- 
berland; Charles E. White, Hyattsville; and Audrey K. 
Zulick, nee Tillium, of Laurel. 



1928 
Representing the Class of 1928 for their 35th Anni- 
versary were J. Slater Davidson, Jr., of Chevy Chase; Paul 
L. Doerr, Washington, District of Columbia; Horace R. 
Hampton, Bethesda; Joseph G. Harrison, Berlin; Mrs. 
Phyllis M. Lovell, nee Houser, of College Heights Estates; 
Mrs. Nova T. Mclsaac, nee Thompson, Arlington, Vir- 
ginia; Mrs. Victor S. Myers, nee Louise Marlow; E. R. 
Nicholas, St. Augustine, Florida; Ralph Powers, Upper 
Marlboro; William H. Press, Washington, District of Co- 
lumbia; Elmer H. Rehberger, Alexandria, Virginia; C. 
Wightman Seabold, Reisterstown; Reese L. Sewell, 
Bethesda; Evelyn E. Shank, nee Eve Eckert; J. W. Stroh- 
man, Chevy Chase; Mallery O. Wooster, Falls Church, 
Virginia. 

1933 

Seventeen members of the Class of 1933 registered for 
their 30th Reunion. They were Norman B. Belt, Hyattsville; 
Howard M. Biggs, Bethesda; J. Tilghman Bishop, Queens- 
town; John H. Bowie, Hagerstown; Dorothy S. Doyle, nee 
Simpson, Scarsdale, New York; John T. Doyle, Scarsdale, 
New York; Guy W. Gienger, Hyattsville; Mrs. Dorothy L. 
Goach, nee Lane, Washington, District of Columbia; 
Robert T. Haas, Ellicott City; Harry E. Hasslinger, College 
Park; C. Gilbert Hoffman, Sr., Annapolis; John W. 
Krasauskas, Takoma Park; H. Hume Mathews, Mountain 
Lakes, New Jersey; Richard B. Murdoch, College Park; 
Norman E. Prince, Hyattsville; Neil C. Read, Silver Spring; 
and Carroll F. Warner, Bethesda. 



the Maryland Magazine 



I he ( lass of 1938 






Alumni Association President, Harry Hasslingcr, 
left, and Mrs. Erna Chapman. Association 
Vice President, chat with a fellow alumnus. 




1938 

For their 25th Anniversary, the Class of 1938 had 
twenty-three members who returned to enjoy Alumni Day, 
1963. They were Herbert Baker, Waynesboro, Pennsyl- 
vania; Charles L. Benton, Hyattsville; David L. Brigham, 
Sandy Spring; Letitia S. Burrier, Baltimore; Harold L. 
Cladny, Washington, District of Columbia; Robert S. 
Diggs, Wallingford, Pennsylvania; Charles L. Downey, 
Williamsport; Abram Z. Gottwals, Salisbury; Joseph 
Henderson, Baltimore; Curtis L. Hollister, Silver Spring; 
Eleanor C. Kalivoda, nee Cruikshank, Hydes; Albin O. 
Kuhn, College Park; Keith Lawson, Raleigh, North Caro- 
lina; Henry Latterner, Jr., Washington, District of Colum- 
bia; Charles H. Pierce, Jr., Silver Spring; Col. J. Logan 
Schutz, Columbus, Ohio; Dr. Harry Schwartz, Wakefield, 
Massachusetts; G. William Seabold, Glyndon; Clay W. 
Shaw, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania; James Turnbull, Silver 
Spring; Isabel H. Turnbull, nee Hamilton, Silver Spring; 
Bob Walton, Ft. Bragg, North Carolina; Donald H. 
Williams, Kensington. 

1943 
The Class of 1943 had fifteen members who registered 
for their 20th Anniversary. They were Tom Bourne, College 
Heights Estates; Donald M. Boyd, Rockville; Lois H. 
Butler, nee Suit, Fallston; Clarice G. Counts, nee Glick- 
man, Landover; Ruth Dubb, Baltimore; Mary Dunn, 
Hyattsville; Louis Flax, Silver Spring; Larry Q. Green, 
Wilmington, Delaware; Thornton F. Green, Adelphi; 
Charles R. Hayleck, Jr., Hyattsville; L. D. Hoffman, Jr., 
Silver Spring; Walt Longanecker, Arlington, Virginia; 




Betty J. Naylor, nee Jacoby, Springfield. Pennsylvania; 
Glen Weston, Springfield, Virginia; Elizabeth G. Weston, 
nee Gruver, Springfield, Virginia. 

1948 

The 1948 Class members who registered for their 15th 
Anniversary were Barbara McCutcheon, Braddock 
Heights; H. W. Schab, Annapolis; Betty Nina Smusyn, 
nee Langmaek, Rockville; Edward R. Talone, Silver 
Spring; Hortense (Bunny) Tugler, nee Bunting, Towson: 
Janet M. Young, Middletown; and Robert O. Zeller. 
Hyattsville. 

There were many others from Classes not celebrating 
formal Five-year Reunions, who visited the Student Union 
to register, and among these were some wonderful old 
timers who preceded the 50-year Reunion Class. The) 
were Dr. T. B. Symons, College Park. Class of 1902; E. 
P. Walls of Hyattsville, of the Class of 1903; J. J. T. 
Graham of Bowie, for the Class of 1906; also J. Hunter 
of Church Hill, of the Class of 1906; George G. Becker of 
Chatham, New Jersey; and Barney R. Cooper o( Worton, 
Maryland; and still a third, Carroll A. Warthen. Hunting- 
town P. O., Calvert County, all of the Class of 1908. Col. 
O. H. Saunders, Washington, District of Columbia, repre- 
sented the Class of 1910; Lindsay McD. Silvester of Wash- 
ington. District of Columbia, for the Class of 191 1 . and for 
the Class of 1912 we had Nathan R. Warthen. Kensington. 

Other proud alumni were Dr. Reginald Truitt. Stevens- 
ville, 19 14; lee R. Pennington. Chevy Chase, and 
William T. Perkins, Hyattsville, both of the Class oi 19 15; 
I eslie E. Bopst, Hyattsville. Class of 1916; Seymour \\ . 



Ma\- J une, 1963 



Ruff, Randallstown, Class of 1917, and James W. Stevens. 
Baltimore, of the Class of 1919. 

From the Class of 1920 were Ted Bissell, University 
Park: and Dean of Men, Geary Eppley, University of 
Maryland. The Class of 1921 had Wm. Paul Walker, Col- 
lege Park; and A. W. "Gus" Hines, Gaithersburg; J. Verno 
Lemmert, Baltimore; and Clayton Reynolds of Denton; 
all three from the Class of 1922. There were George S. 
Langford, College Park, of the Class of 1924; Victor S. 
Myers. Laurel, of the Class of 1925; Dr. Roy H. Bridger, 
Silver Spring, and Olive W. McBride, nee Wallace, Hunt- 
ingdon. Pennsylvania, both of the Class of 1926. 

There were five who registered from the Class of 1927. 
They were Mylo S. Downey, College Park; Josephine M. 
Blandford, Washington, District of Columbia; Elizabeth 
J. Taylor, Washington, District of Columbia; Egbert F. 
Tingley, Hyattsville; and Helen R. White, nee Rose, 
Hyattsville. Five members of the Class of 1929 registered: 
Ray Colburn, Havre de Grace; Robert Lee Evans, Arling- 
ton, Virginia; Aaron Friedenwald, Baltimore; E. T. Loane, 
Baltimore; and Fred Wallett, Baltimore. 

Mrs. Foster W. Nixon, nee Marian Lane, Silver Spring, 
and W. Lawrence Smallwood, Washington, District of 
Columbia, were representing the Class of 1930. For the 
Class of 1931 were G. Clifford Byrd, Arlington, Virginia, 
Chicken McNutt Kricker, nee McNutt, Sandy Spring; and 
C. W. Tawney, 1416 Northgate Rd., Baltimore. The Class 
of 1932 had Louis W. Berger, Rockville; W. A. Burslem, 
Hyattsville; and S. Chester Ward, College Park, to repre- 
sent them. 

Twelve members of the Class of 1935 registered: Char- 
lotte F. Hasslinger, nee Farnham, College Park; Miss Clara 
M. Dixon, Glen Burnie; John C. Dye, Silver Spring; Jacob 
Friedman, Chillum; Jacob B. Sclar, Silver Spring; 
Llewellyn H. Welsh, Bethesda; Tracy Coleman, Silver 
Spring; Virginia Coleman, nee Ijams, Silver Spring; Dr. 
David V. Lumnsdcn, Chevy Chase; Dorothy L. Ordwein, 
Glen Burnie; Paul R. Poffenberger, Silver Spring; and 
Frank Wise, Chevy Chase. For 1936, we had John W. 
Cronin, Hyattsville; Col. Edward M. Minion, Aberdeen; 
and Paul E. Mullinix, Richmond, Virginia. The Class of 
1937 had Henry E. Butler, Fallston; Edith B. Downey, nee 
Bell, Williamsport; Matthews J. Haspert, Towson; and 
Mrs. Paul E. Mullinix, nee Carolyn Young, Richmond, 



The Class of 1928. 





Senior Alumni at the Union. 

Virginia, to represent it. George Knepley, Falls Church, 
Virginia, and Paul M. Galbreath, College Park, repre- 
sented the Class of 1939. 

The Class of 1941 had five members register: Howard 
M. Bailey, Easton; Ralph Frey, Takoma Park; James M. 
Lanigan, Jr., College Park; Norman A. Miller, Jr., Har- 
wood; Marjorie R. Wharton, nee Ruppersberger, Catons- 
ville. There were eight members from the Class of 1942 
who registered, as follows, Frank Bentz, Silver Spring; 
John E. Cordyack, Frederick; M. D. Duvall, Bowie; 
Richard H. Funke, Jr., Ellicott City; Frank "Bud" Heyer, 
Silver Spring; Bob Smith, College Park; Mrs. Joseph M. 
Steger, nee Newmaker, Cumberland; James H. "Pop" 
Wharton, Catonsville. For the Class of 1946, we had Leslie 
A. Smith, College Park; and C. Robert Varndell, Balti- 
more; Mrs. Mildred W. Going, nee Wiker, Silver Spring; 
and James A. Stapp, College Park; and Ruth K. Town- 
shend, Mitchellville, registered for the Class of 1947. 
Members of the Class of 1949 who registered were Edward 
S. Beach, Jr., Hyattsville; E. P. Beachum, Bethlehem, 
Pennsylvania; Lewis G. Cook, Glen Burnie; and Robert 
C. Wiley, Adelphi. 

For the Class of 1952, we had Robert Chiodi, Doyles- 
town, Pennsylvania; Frank M. Claggett, Upper Marlboro; 
Bernard A. Twigg, College Park; and Gordon H. Ward, 
Adelphi. The Class of 1953 had Dennis Abe, College Park; 
Abraham Kishter, Clinton, Iowa; Robert M. Langmack. 
Beltsville; Capt. Douglas G. Robin, Hyattsville; and 
Thomas M. Russell, Silver Spring. Robert Geier, Univer- 
sity Park, registered for the Class of 1954. For the Class 
of 1955, Albert C. Bauer, Beltsville, and Thomas P. 
Moran, College Park, registered. There were two who reg- 
istered for the Class of 1956. They were Katherine Baine, 
College Park, and Franklin J. Jackson, Washington, Dis- 
trict of Columbia. Registering for the Class of 1958 were 
Matthew E. Booker, Hyattsville, and Col. Charles C. 
Lutman, Suitland. The Class of 1959 had Mrs. Eleanor 
J. Clark, nee Munsey, Rockville; William F. Clark, Rock- 
ville; and Larraine Elder, Rockville, to represent them. 
From the Class of 1961 were Barbara Mullinix, Richmond, 
Virginia; and Thomas V. Saliga, Silver Spring, who reg- 
istered. Winding up the list of the Class of 1962 were 
Paul W. Pendorf, Groton, Connecticut; Tom Sankovich, 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania, and Ronald G. Wolf, Silver 
Spring. 

the Maryland Magazine 




Before massed microphones at their press con- 
ference: Mrs. Breen. Mr. Breen and Dr. Findle) 



After Five Months Confinement 



University Concludes 
Space 'Flight' Experiment 



A SIGNIFICANT EXPERIMENT IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR JUST 
concluded by the University's Space Research Lab- 
oratory has attracted considerable interest. 

The experiment placed a 35-year-old man in a chamber 
where he lived for five months under a continuous and 
highly-programmed experimental environment. 

The objectives of the experiment were: to examine a 
psychological environment for its adequacy in properly 
maintaining a subject over an extended period of time 
while the subject is under social isolation and geographical 
restriction; and to assess and improve the value of this 
new experimental approach as a research tool for answer- 
ing specific behavioral and physiological questions. 

Principal investigator was Dr. Jack D. Findley, of the 
Department of Psychology. Whilden P. Breen, Jr., a 
research assistant in the Space Research Laboratory, was 
the subject in the experiment. 

The experiment was financed by a grant from the Na- 
tional Aeronautics and Space Administration and was 
part of an advanced program of research in the life sciences 
currently being conducted by the Office of Advanced 
Research and Technology, NASA. 

Much of the information learned from the experiment 
will be applied to the problems inherent in manned space- 
craft. Advanced manned aerospace missions will require 
astronauts to spend extensive periods of time confined 
within space vehicles, orbiting space laboratories or sta- 
tions and within extraterrestrial bases. In space environ- 
ment, humans will be subject to many psychological, physi- 
ological and physical stresses which tend to decrease their 
efficiency. The University experiment is one of a series 



of integrated investigations to discover the most advan- 
tageous methods of organizing the total living environment 
of subjects such that they may perform at appropriate 
levels for long periods of time under confined conditions 
that typify certain space activities. 

Mr. Breen entered the specially designed chamber on 
November 17, 1962, and signaled for his release on April 
17, 1963. His chamber consisted of three rooms, one of 
these 1 2-feet square, and two others alcoves of five square 
feet each. He was provided with a program of activities 
which covered many of the critical behaviors of normal 
existence, from recreational tasks to the obtainment of 
the necessities of life. The program was monitored in part 
by automatic equipment which recorded the subject's per- 
formances. Mr. Breen was also monitored visually by 
means of a television camera. The experiment was stalled 
around-the-clock by technicians and scientists. 

When Mr. Breen ended his confinement five months 
to the day he entered, he established a new scientific record 
for the longest voluntary solitary confinement. But the 
real value of the experiment lay in the mass of informa- 
tion collected during the "flight." 

"We have learned a great deal from this experiment," 
said Dr. Findley. 

The University of Maryland is the largest educational 
facility located in the Washington, D. ('.. metropolitan 
area — an area which is fast becoming the scientific research 
center of the Nation. 

This most recently concluded experiment of the Space 
Research Laboratory continues the pioneering work and 
interest of the University in the area of space research. 



May-June, 1963 




Left: interior of Breen's 'space' cham- 
ber. In the background right, is his pull- 
down bed; in the foreground, left is his 
eating table; in the center, his oil paint- 
ing, conceived for purposes of recreation. 



8 





Above: Dr. Findley adjusts one of 
the electronic panels which controlled 
and monitored Breen's existence. 



Right: a laboratory assistant checks a 
switch in another corner of the chamber. 



the Maryland Magazine 







■ I 



1'hr Dorse) Press, Inc. 

ii > I i ii,,,..,- 




I 



\ 

I [istorj 

of 
Western 
( ]\\ ilization 



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Maryland Books 
and Authors 



A History of How Our 
Civilization Developed 



A HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVI- 
LIZATION by Dr. Roland N. 
Stromberg. Published by the Dor- 
sey Press, Inc., Homewood, Illi- 
nois, 1963. xvi, 794 p. $11.95. 

After the publication of so many 
history books dealing with Western 
civilization (especially within the last 
decade as Americans, conscious of 
their world role, turned to history to 
determine the factors of their rise), it 
might certainly be routine to report 
the issuance of this text. But the bri- 
liance of A History of Western Civi- 
lization warrants special attention. 

Alumni (most of us, at any rate) 
remember their history lessons as fac- 



tual recitals of the chronology of Man. 
In high school we were taught only 
American history. In college, we were 
instructed in European history, with 
clearly marked guideposts indicating 
the way to the new democracy in the 
New World. 

Now, the world has changed. West- 
ern civilization as we understand it 
is under continued and strong chal- 
lenge. Our ideals are questioned, 
from within and without. And so we 
turn back to our past, the roots of all 
of our knowledge to reexamine, and 
to refresh and strengthen. 

To fully show the true meaning of 
our heritage, Dr. Stromberg combines 
historical fact with historical idea. 



On the origin of Man: 

The ability to walk upright, on 
two feet instead of four, seems 
to have been the critical step 
on the road to Man's evolution 
as a creature capable of intel- 
ligent thought and rational 
action beyond all others. The 
skillful hand was decisive; not 
merely because with it Man 
could make tools, but because 
he could protect his head and 
procure his food, thereby re- 
leasing the skull from a weight 
which limited brain capacity. 

The Hebrews: 

Thus the Bible is a great series 
o( dramatic scenes and mem- 
orable events- -a "stor\ -telling 
masterpiece."' But it is more 



May-June, 1963 




than that, of course. Most 
primitive peoples have strong 
imaginations, desert peoples 
perhaps most of all. What was 
singular about the Hebrews 
was their monotheism — their 
One God, a jealous god whose 
unity and soleness was attested 
by all the prophets. Yahweh, 
discovered by Moses, was 
more than a tribal god to be 
summoned up on military oc- 
casions. In Hebraic history he 
was a powerful living presence 
who dominated the historical 
process and controlled all of 
nature. At length he became a 
universal God, who had picked 
Israel as his special agent but 
who reigned over all men. By 
means of history and by 
poetry, the Jews discovered a 
philosophical idea of profound 
import. 

On Socrates: 

He believed that Man had a 
soul, or that there was some- 
thing of this sort that Man 
shared: a higher reality, spir- 
itual in nature, existing some- 
how behind or beyond the ap- 
parent world of body and 
senses. It was this which guar- 
anteed that Truth and Justice 
really existed, to be traced 
down amid the welter of shift- 
ing opinion and the amoral 
clash ol political factions. To 
all future generations Socrates 
bequeathed this tremendous 
idea. Christianity would silent- 



ly absorb much of the Socratic 
soul into its system, later; a 
Christian humanist of the Ren- 
aissance like Erasmus of Rot- 
terdam would virtually canon- 
ize "Saint Socrates." Socrates 
left a myth for the West to 
build on; it was described in 
immortal languages by his 
most renowned pupil, Plato. 

On Victorian stability: 

(Queen) Victoria created a 
monarchy in the image of the 
respectable middle class. In 
doing so she did much to sta- 
bilize society and politics. As 
her long reign wore on, she 
took on the attributes of a na- 
tional symbol — even an inter- 
national one. For in this era 
of British ascendancy — when 
Lombard Street was the 
world's economic capital, and 
English liberalism the most 
widely shared article of politi- 
cal faith — "Victorian" became 
an adjective used to describe 
civilization over much of Eu- 
rope and the United States. 

On the Cuban Crisis: 

In October, 1962, the world 
trembled for a moment, some 
thought, on the brink of catas- 
trophe (the Cuba crisis, involv- 
ing the threat of nuclear war 
between the Soviet Union and 
the United States), only to 
seize fresh hope from the suc- 
cessful surmounting of that 
crisis amid signs of a possible 
detente in the Cold War. The 
precarious nature of the hu- 
man tenure on earth, poised 
between creation and disaster, 
was never more poignantly il- 
lustrated. 

This technique of combining facts 
and ideas into a "history of ideas" 
forms the book's style of presenta- 
tion. In this respect, Dr. Stromberg 
has drawn on the concept of the his- 
tory of ideas pioneered by the late 
Professor Arthur O. Lovejoy, who 
served as a member of the University 
of Maryland Board of Regents, 195 1- 
1955, and who, for many years, served 
as Professor of Philosophy at The 
Johns Hopkins University. 

"History," Dr. Stromberg believes, 
"can be a meaningless collection of 
facts. To understand the lessons of 
history, to give it meaning, facts must 
be interpreted, the student's imagina- 
tion must be kindled." 

"Basically, our heritage of the past 
concerns not so much the wars of the 
Greeks, but their method of rational 



and scientific thought. The text of 
A History of Western Civilization 
strongly reflects my interest in intel- 
lectual history." 

Dr. Stromberg has been teaching 
western civilization and European 
history for 14 years and his text is a 
natural outgrowth of this teaching 
experience. He estimates that at the 
University, perhaps 1,000 students a 
year are enrolled in the two-semester 
course of western civilization. This 
figure expands to approximately 100,- 
000, when applied to all American 
colleges and universities. In a recent 
development, Maryland public schools 
now include in their curriculum a 
course of study dealing with world 
history, in addition to the traditional 
courses in American history. 

Students who are not mature find 
the western civilization course diffi- 
cult. "High school students are gen- 
erally not capable of receiving the 
maximum advantage from a history 
course because of their lack of ma- 
turity and experience. For several 
years I taught in the University Col- 
lege overseas program. I found stu- 
dents there excelling in their work, 
for the reason that their intellects 
were mature and their experience con- 
siderable." 

Dr. Stromberg has been a member 
of the Department of History since 
1949. He is the author of A History 
of European Civilization and, with 
others, The United States: A History 
of Democracy. His most recently pub- 
lished book is Collective Security and 
American Foreign Policy: From the 
League of Nations to NATO. His ar- 
ticles have been published in the Jour- 
nal of History of Ideas, History Today 
and the Journal of Economic History, 
and he has contributed essays to sev- 
eral anthologies dealing with interna- 
tional relations. He is also the author 
of Religious Liberalism in 18th Cen- 
tury England, a book based on his 
Ph.D. dissertation and published by 
the Oxford University Press, London. 
Dr. Stromberg received the degree 
Doctor of Philosophy from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Alumni interested in a unique and 
brilliant account of how their civili- 
zation developed should visit their 
bookshop to inquire about the avail- 
ability of A History of Western Civi- 
lization. 

R. H. B. 



JO 



the Maryland Magazine 



The General Alumni Council 

school and college 
representa ti ves : 

A c, R 1 ( II I.T U RE 

Mylo Downey, '27 
Abram Z. Gottwals, '38 
H. M. Carroll, '20 

A K r s * SCIENCES 

Joe Mathias, '35 
Jess Krajovic, '32 
Richard Bourne, '57 

BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas E. Bourne, Jr. 
Chester W. Tawney, '3 1 
Jacob B. Sclar, '34 

DENTISTRY 

Dr. Charles E. Broadrup, '32 
Dr. Edward D. Stone, Jr., '25 
Dr. George B. Clendenin, '29 

EDUCATION 

Edward S. Beach, Jr., '49 
Harry E. Hasslinger, '33 
Miss Dorothy Ordwein, '35 

ENGINEERING 

Emmett T. Loane, '29 
Tracy Coleman, '35 
James A. Stapp, Jr., '47 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Ruth Lee Thompson Clarke, '42 
Mrs. Mary Ward Davis, '55 
Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '43 



Hon. W. Albert Menchine, '29 
Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 
Hon. Joseph L. Carter, '25 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Arthur G Siwinski, '3 1 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 
Dr. Frank K. Morris 

NURSING 

Mrs. E. Elizabeth Roth Hipp, '29 

Miss Doris Stevens, '51 

Mrs. Kathryn P. Donnelly, '48 

I' II ARM AC V 



Hyman Davidov '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen '25 
Dr. Frank J. Slama '24 



EXOFFICIO MEMBERS: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, A&S '38 

Director & Executive Secretary 
Victor Holm, A&S '57 

Field Secretary 
Past Presidents 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, DDS '19 
C. V. Koons, Engr. '29 
Talbot T. Speer, Agr. '17 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, MD 12 
Col. O. H. Saunders, Engr. '10 
J. Homer Remsberg, Agr. '18 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, LL.B. '33 
Joseph H. Deckman, Engr. '3 1 
Frank Block, Phar. '24 
Harry A. Boswell, Jr., BPA '42 
Mrs. Elizabeth Rohr Singleton, 

Nurs. '47; Edu. '51 
Dr. Reginald V. Truitt, A&S "14 

• 
ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENT ATH'ES : 
Baltimore — John L. Lampe, A&S, '50 
"M" Club — George W. Knepley, Edu., '39 
Montgomery County — Donald M. Boyd 
Pittsburgh — A. B. "Budd" Fisher, Eng "26 
Prince Georges County — 

Dr. John W. Cronin, DDS '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, Agr. '36 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, Agr. '19 
U. S. Department of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, Agr. '26 
Washington County — 

Charles B. Huyett, A&S '53 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



IT IS GOOD TO BE WANTED, lo Id REMEMBERED, VND Id HI WELCOMED 
home. Alumni Day, alumni banquets, class reunions and ( ommencement 
. . . There is ever the constant Bow of new laces and new ambitions to the 
outside, and the return of older laces, with the pride ol accomplishment, to 
the starting point. This is the story of the University. I he younger use the 
college springboard to meet the challenges of maturity. I he older take 
pleasure in the return which enables them to tell in a modest waj oi theil 
own achievements, while at the same time learning of the progress ol others, 
in which they have had a deep interest. 

For 17 years we have had the personal experience of moving in the inner 
circle of both Commencement and Reunion preparations. We have completer) 
enjoyed the end product of good fellowship, friendship and tall tales. Basically, 
this is a primary function in alumni work. You prepare the waj tor the new 
alumnus and you enjoy the satisfaction of visiting with those who return briefl) 
to report progress in the battle of life. 

It is an old story, but deeply significant. The young man left his family 
and his home to seek his fortune in his own way. For a time those who had 
contributed most to his preparation were forgotten and ignored. The years 
passed and an aging mother and father received a letter. Briefly it stated "1 
will be on the train next Wednesday. If I am welcome at home, after the years 
of heartache and neglect, please hang a white cloth on the cherry tree at the 
edge of town. If there is no cloth, I will know I am not welcome." When the 
train reached the town limits, a passenger viewed an old tree completely 
covered with bed sheets. 

It is understandable that younger alumni have many factors in their lives 
which prevent their giving time and attention to their Alma Mater. There 
are homes to establish, families to create, employment obligations, social 
activities, and financial pressures. These are understood and appreciated. 
The point to remember is that always the University of Maryland has a 
welcome sign on its gate for any of its own, both of the past and the future. 
Perhaps the face has changed, and many features are different. Underneath 
are the same identifying characteristics, which assure the returning Alumnus 
that it is still his University, and that the service which he obtained in his 
quest for knowledge is still available to others like him. The graduate who 
returned for a 50th anniversary with his classmates knew he had come home, 
knew he was welcome, and was certain that the future was bright. 

Life is indeed short! How many times we have heard it said "It seems we 
only graduated yesterday." Some sage has said "We come into this life crying, 
while those about us smile. Our objective must be to live a life which will 
enable us to depart smiling, while those about us cry." It has been good 
to re-live old days, but it has meant even more to be a part of the preparation 
for an unexplored tomorrow. 



Sincerely, 




£2t*v' 



David L. Brigh \m 
Alumni Secretary 



May-June, 1963 



II 




MAY 

30 Memorial Day, Holiday 

31 Pre-Examination Study Day 

JUNE 

1-7 Spring Semester Examinations 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 

25 Summer Session Begins 



2 Baccalaureate Exercises. College 
Park 

8 Commencement Exercises, Col- 
lege Park 

17-22 Rural Women's Short Course 
24 Summer Session Registration 



JULY 

4 Independence Day, Holiday 

AUGUST 

5-10 4-H Club Week 



Annual Pharmacy Dance 

The Annual Entertainment and Dance 
(Valentine Dance) of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation of the School of Pharmacy was 
held at the Emerson Hotel. 

Milton A. Friedman, First Vice-Pres- 
ident, acknowledged the presence of ap- 
proximately 300 students, faculty mem- 
bers, guests and members of the Asso- 
ciation. 

President Sam A. Goldstein extended 
the welcome and introduced special 
guests, Harry E. Hasslinger, President 
of the General Alumni Association; 
John Lampe, President of the Baltimore 
Club of the University of Maryland, 
and Mrs. Lampe; and David L. Brig- 
ham, Director of Alumni Relations at 
College Park. 

Harold Levin and Herman Bloom 
were co-chairmen of the entertainment, 
which featured Barbara Capanos, sing- 
ing star of the William Bendix Show 
Boat, and Don Garnett, hypnotist, who 
selected several persons from the audi- 
ence for a demonstration. 

Music for entertainment and dancing 
was provided by Abe Guard and his 
Buddy Deane TV. Orchestra. 

Co-chairmen of the Souvenir Pro- 
gram were Aaron M. Libowitz and 
Harold Levin. This program provides 
the Association with some three thou- 
sand dollars to carry on its activities, 
including scholarships through the 
Student Aid and Scholarship Commit- 



tee for students entering pharmacy who 
are worthy and in need of financial aid. 

Solomon Weiner and George Stiff- 
man served as co-chairmen of the ticket 
committee. 

Door prizes were donated by the 
Whitman Candy Company, Allen & 
Sons, I. & L. Candy and Tobacco Com- 
pany. Muth Bros. & Co., Calvert Drug 
Co., Loewy Drug Company, H. B. Gil- 
pin Company and Seven-Up Bottling 
Company. 

President Goldstein expressed his ap- 
preciation to committee members and 
others who contributed to the success 
of the affair. 



Chem Alumni 
Meet in California 

A University of Maryland luncheon 
was held on April 3 at the Statler-Hilton 
Hotel in Los Angeles, California, for 
Chemistry alumni, in conjunction with 
the spring meeting of the American 
Chemical Society. There were 1 3 alumni 
present. 

The luncheon was arranged by Dr. 
Ronald Brown, B.S. '32, Ph.D.. Harvard 
'39, head of the Chemistry Department 
at the University of Southern California 
in Los Angeles. 

Dr. Gilbert Gordon and Dr. Gordon 
Atkinson of the Chemistry Department 
presented papers at the Spring meeting 



of the Society, along with Mr. Robert 
Argauer, graduate assistant in the 
Chemistry Department, who presented 
a paper by Dr. Charles E. White, head 
of the Chemistry Department. 



School of Dentistry 
Dean is Appointed 

Dr. John J. Salley, Professor and Chair- 
man of the Department of Oral Pathol- 
ogy at the Medical College of Virginia, 
has been appointed Dean of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of Dentistry 
effective July 1. He will succeed Dr. 
Myron S. Aisenberg who will retire in 
June after 41 years of service. 

The newly appointed Dean was born 
in Richmond, Virginia, in 1926. He at- 
tended the Richmond public schools, 
Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, 
and the Richmond Professional Insti- 
tute of the College of William and 
Mary, Richmond. He holds both the 
degrees of doctor of dental surgery 
which he obtained from the Medical 
College of Virginia in 1947 and the 
degree of doctor of philosophy in 
pathology which he obtained from the 
University of Rochester School of 
Medicine and Dentistry in 1954. 

Dr. Salley, an Air Force veteran, has 
had wide experience as an educator, 
consultant and researcher. He joined 
the faculty of the Medical College of 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 



Virginia in 1954 as an Instructor in 
pathology, oral diagnosis and therapeu- 
tics. Promoted to Assistant Professor ol 
pathology and dentistry in 1955 and 
Associate Professor in 1959, he was 
elevated to the Chairmanship of the 
Department of Oral Pathology in I960. 
He was appointed full Professor in 
1962. 

In addition to his academic duties. 
Dr. Salley is Coordinator oi Cancer 
Teaching at the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia, member of the Tumor Board of 
the Medical College of Virginia Hos- 
pitals, and Dental Consultant for the 
Commonwealth of Virginia. 

He also serves as consultant in oral 
pathology to the Veterans Hospital in 
Richmond, National Institute oi Dental 
Research in Bethesda and National 
Board of Dental Examiners, American 
Dental Association. 

Dr. Salley is currently serving as a 
member of the Dental Study Section at 
NIH and Advisory Editorial Board of 
the Journal of Denial Research, and 
chairman of the American Cancer So- 
ciety Institutional Grant committee at 
the Medical College of Virginia. The 
holder of numerous awards and honors, 
he was the recipient of the Outstanding 
Civilian Service Medal from the De- 
partment of Army in 1961. 

Dr. Aisenberg has been Dean of the 
University of Maryland School of Den- 
tistry since 1954. He was appointed As- 
sistant Professor in the Dental Depart- 
ment of the University in 1922, the same 
year of his graduation and a year be- 
fore the consolidation of the University 
department with the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery. The latter school, a 
forerunner of the present School of 
Dentistry, was established in 1823 and 
was the first dental school in the world 
and created the dental profession. 



18 Engineering Alumni 
Employed by Commission 

University of Maryland Engineering 
graduates who are employed in the 
Washington Suburban Sanitary Commis- 
sion Engineering Department include: 
Chief Engineers Office — Robert J. 
McLeod, '37, Chief Engineer, Charles 
L. Armentrout, Jr., '48, Sr. Designing 
Engineer; Maintenance and Operations 
Division — James H. Lee, '51, System 
Maintenance Engineer, Raymond F. 
Stucker, '62, Assistant Engineer; Con- 
struction Division — Dock Y. Jew, '53, 
Sr. Assistant Engineer; Plans and Sur- 
veys Division — James A. Stapp, Jr., '47, 
Division Engineer; Clifford Hilton, '50, 
Sr. Designing Engineer, Robert J. Roth- 
enhoefer, '52, Sr. Designing Engineer, 
Robert H. Baumgardner, '59, Bernard J. 
Bovelsky, '62, Harry E. Knight, '58, 
George Lambros, '60, Robert M. Rus- 
sell, '61, Stephen Tamburo, '62, Wyman 



Williams, '56, Albert J. Zettler, '60, IV 
signing Engineers; Materials Division 

James B. Naurot, '55, Soils T ngmcci 
Plumbing Division — John C. Hamilton, 
'43, Assistant Engineer. 



Law Alumni Honor 
Judge Morris A. Soper 

The Alumni Association of the School 
of Law held its annual banquet May 5 
as a testimonial to the late Judge Morris 
A. Soper. in whose name an annual 
lectureship is to be established. 

Dean William P. Cunningham deliv- 
ered the principal address, reporting his 
plans for the future of the School. 

The outgoing President of the Alumni 
Association, the Honorable W. Albert 
Menchine. presided as toastmaster and 
introduced the following list of officers 
for the ensuing year: 

President, The Honorable Joseph L. 
Carter; First Vice-President, Thomas 
N. Berry; Second Vice-President, Sam- 
uel J. Fisher; Third Vice-President, 
Emma S. Robertson; Secretary-Treasur- 
er, G. Kenneth Reiblich. 

Executive Committee: Samuel W. 
Barrick, Perry G. Bowen, Jr., Frederick 
R. Buck, The Hon. Stewart O. Day, 
Clare Green Duckett, Benjamin A. 
Earnshaw, Frederick J. Green, Jr.. 
Thomas Hunter Lowe, William H. 
Price, H. Paul Rome. 

Dean Cunningham welcomed the 
graduating class to its forthcoming 
membership in the Association, and 
awarded the following honors and 
prizes: 

The Elizabeth Maxwell Carroll Chesnut 
Prize, for good scholarship in a broad 
sense: Mona S. Lambird, Baltimore. 

The Roger Howell Achievement Award. 
for leadership, scholarship, and moral 
character: Laurence M. Katz, Bal- 
timore. 

The Sam Allen Memorial Prize for 
leadership and scholarship: David H. 
Clark, Baltimore. 

The Samuel S. Levin Prize, for char- 
acter and leadership: William H. 
Price II, Baltimore. 

The Lawyers Title Award, for profi- 
ciency in the law of real property: 
Donald E. Sharpe, Baltimore. 

The Nu Beta Epsilon Prize for the 
most significant piece of legal writing 
in the Maryland Law Review — 
Laurence M. Katz. 

The U. S. Law Week Award, for the 
most satisfactory scholastic progress 
during the final school year: Elzbieta 
K. Adamska, Towson. 



ORDI K OI Nil ( Oil 

.1 national law school honoi u >- 
< it i\ founded i<> em outage u hoi- 
arship and to advance the ethical 
standards oj the legal profession; 
<ml\- students among the iirsi 

lentil of the SenUJI claSS air rl. 

hie. 

Student members elected 

Josi i'ii ( I ism i< n . Jr., Baltimi 
John I . Josi i-ii. Baltimore. 
Laurenci M k\i/. Baltimore. 
Gerald a. Kroop, Baltimore. 
Mona S. Lambird, Baltimore. 
I .i.i. N. Sa( us. Baltimore. 
Donald E. SHARPE, Baltimore. 
WILBUR E. Simmons. Jr.. Arnold. 
David W. Simpson, Baltimore. 

Faculty member elected 
Bernard Auerbach, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Law. 

Honorary member elected 
Judge Wd i iam C. Wai sh. Cumberland 

member of the law firm Miles and 
Stockbridge and member of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Board of Regents. 

MARYLAND LAW REVIEW 
CERTIFICATES 

William H. Price II, Baltimore. 
Laurence M. KATZ, Baltimore. 
Donald E. Sharpe, Baltimore. 
Mona S. Lambird, Baltimore. 
Wilbur E. Simmons, Jr., Arnold. 
John O. Dyrud, Jr., Brooklyn, New 
York. 

John T. Joseph, Baltimore. 
Robert W. Baker, Baltimore. 
David H. Clark, Baltimore. 
David S. Cordish, Baltimore. 
Arthur K. Crocker, Baltimore. 
J. Harlan Livezey, Aberdeen. 
Allen L. Schwait, Towson. 
J. Frederick Sharer, Baltimore. 

Announce Woodrow 
Wilson Fellowships 

Three University of Maryland seniors 
have been awarded Woodrow Wilson 
Fellowships for 1963-64, it was recently 
announced by the Woodrow Wilson 
National Fellowship Foundation. 

The three winners are Barbara 
Frances Bode, Comparative Literature: 
Mrs. Angela Moorjani. French and Rus- 
sian; and Kenneth D. Rude. Economics. 

Included in the Honorable Mention 
list are University students Clark L. 
Alden. History; Ulrich Gerlach. Physics: 
Iris M. Kaplan. Psychology; Margaret 
W. Leonard, Comparative Literature; 
and Mrs. Aija S. Ozolins. English. 

The main function oi the Woodrow 
Wilson Fellowship Foundation is to 
attract larger numbers of men and 
women to college and university teach- 
ing. The chief criterion for nomination 
is that a faculty member would con- 
sider the student worth) oi being a 
colleague alter graduate training. 



May-June, 1963 



13 



THOREAU 

the Rebel 



by DR. CARL BODE 

Professor of English 

ILLUSTRATIONS BY HOWARD BEHRENS 



MANY AMERICAN WRITERS OF A CENTURY AGO SLEEP 
quietly between the covers of our textbooks. Not 
Henry Thoreau. His ideas and attitudes go marching on, 
with a faster pace all the time. His writings were almost 
ignored while he was alive. Yet in our day they have 
played an important part even in world affairs. Their 
effect has been seen on someone as far away as Gandhi in 
India and as near at hand as the "Freedom Riders" on 
Route 40. Gandhi said of Thoreau, "His ideas influenced 
me greatly"; and more than one member of CORE has 
taken Thoreau's writings with him to jail. 

What makes Thoreau useful for us all is, I believe, that 
he questions so many things we take for granted. He makes 
us think about our assumptions, even though he may not 
lead us to abandon them. And he offers us lessons in the 
nature of right rebellion, lessons that we need in this age 
of conformity. 

Thoreau was both a positive and a negative rebel. To 
take the negative side first, we might term him a "prot- 
estant," a born protester. We all have met the kind of man 
who automatically says no instead of yes. Thoreau was 
such a man. His best friend, Ralph Waldo Emerson, once 
said of him that "he did not feel himself except in oppo- 
sition." 



14 



A characteristic aspect of his "protestantism" was the 
animosity he felt towards both his peers and the older 
generation. And it was a genuine animosity. It was some- 
thing emotional as well as intellectual. Underlying it was 
Thoreau's deepening conviction that his ideas about value 
were superior to those of anyone around him but especially 
to those of his elders. He summed it up with whimsical 
irony in a famous passage from Walden: 

THE GREATER PART OF WHAT MY NEIGH- 
BORS CALL GOOD, 1 BELIEVE IN MY SOUL 
TO BE BAD, AND IF I REPENT OF ANYTHING, 
IT IS VERY LIKELY TO BE MY GOOD BE- 
HAVIOR. WHAT DEMON POSSESSED ME 
THAT I BEHAVED SO WELL? YOU MAY SAY 
THE WISEST THING YOU CAN, OLD MAN — 
YOU WHO HAVE LIVED SEVENTY YEARS, 

NOT WITHOUT HONOR OF A KIND 1 HEAR 

AN IRRESISTIBLE VOICE WHICH INVITES MF. 
AWAY FROM ALL THAT. ONE GENERATION 
ABANDONS THE ENTERPRISES OF ANOTHER 
LIKE STRANDED VESSELS. 

the Maryland Magazine 






i 



.2 .-•-"., tr.:^; r ft 




rJr- ifV 







,~_ 



4d 



May-June, J 963 



15 



In political matters his "protestantism" stood out. He 
denied the basic premise of democracy in America, the 
. 1 in majority rule. He questioned the wisdom of the 
majority and rejected its claim to impose its will on the 
minority. As he asserted in his now famous essay Civil 
Disobedience, the majority was never necessarily right or 
necessarily fair to the minority. In fact, he implied that 
the contrary was true. Brute power alone allowed the 
majority to carry out its desires. Others in America also 
criticized majority rule at this time, particularly Southern 
political leaders in the debate on slavery; but no one went 
as far as Thoreau. In almost every situation he was a 
minority man. 

The State — that is, the government — personified the 
will of the majority and it was against the State that 
Thoreau soon rebelled. His protest began quietly, increased 
in vigor, was climaxed by a night in prison, and then 
diminished in the last few years of his life because the 
State let him alone. 

In the years before the start of the Civil War there 
were two things that Thoreau rebelled against most earnest- 
ly, two things that struck him as being the grossest of 
wrongs committed by the government. One was the par- 
ticipation of the United States in the Mexican-American 
War of 1846. To Thoreau this was a war of imperialism. 
It was a war which no ethical reason for it and he 
thought that it should be opposed in every way. 
The other was the government position in the middle 
1840's and the 1850's on slavery. Local and national 
government stood on the same side. Massachusetts itself — 
Thoreau's own state — not only countenanced the legal 
aspects of slavery but cooperated in returning escaped 
slaves to the South. The federal government took the 
position that slavery was protected by law and consequently 
must be upheld and defended to the extent that the law 
allowed. 

Thoreau's protest against slavery was, to begin with, 
based on principle only. It was not motivated by zeal or 
by simple humanitarianism. We can see that when he 
says sharply that many abolitionists are fools and busy- 
bodies. They try to reform Negro slavery when they should 
start instead by reforming themselves. They lie enchained 
by prejudice, by ignorance, by stupidity. Let them pay 
attention to freeing themselves first and then fare South 
to free the Negro slave. Such was Thoreau's initial attitude. 

However, as time went on he grew interested in, and 
then devoted to, the abolitionist movement itself. Towards 
the end of his life, he met the man who concluded his 
conversion to abolitionism. That was the militant aboli- 
tionist John Brown. Thoreau's most burning essays are 
dedicated to Brown's defense. By the time he met Brown, 
Thoreau himself was part of the underground railroad as 
an active abolitionist. But this was Thoreau in middle age. 
The early Thoreau had the feeling that reform, like charity, 
might well begin at home and begin with the individual 
rather than the group. Furthermore, he did not feel that 
he ought to be what is called in American political slang 
"a bleeding heart." He said in Civil Disobedience: 

IT IS NOT A MAN'S DUTY, AS A MATTER 
OF COURSE, TO DEVOTE HIMSELF TO THE 
ERADICATION OF ANY, EVEN THE MOST 
ENORMOUS, WRONG/ HE MAY STILL PROP- 
ERLY HAVE OTHER CONCERNS TO ENGAGE 
HIM; BUT IT IS HIS DUTY, AT LEAST, TO 
WASH HIS HANDS OF IT. 




HENRY DAVID THOREAU 

by 

Samuel Worcester Rowse 

Concord Free Public Librun 



Thoreau suited the action to the word. He decided that 
if he was paying taxes or exercising any of his political 
rights, then he was involved in the State. And his duty 
was to disengage himself. As a matter of fact, he even 
sent a document, edged with irony, to the selectmen of 
his village, Concord, Mass., stating that 

I, HENRY THOREAU, DO NOT WISH TO BE 
REGARDED AS A MEMBER OF ANY INCOR- 
PORATED SOCIETY WHICH I HAVE NOT 
JOINED. 

The crucial issue was raised when Thoreau refused to 
pay his poll tax. He would pay his local road tax because 
he wanted to be a good neighbor, but not the State's poll 
tax. Finally Sam Staples, the Concord jailer, hailed him 
in and put him into prison; there, after he was introduced 
around, he settled for the night. He talked with some of 
the other inmates. He discovered that the noises of the 
town heard from within the prison were very different 
from what they had been to him outside. The next morning 
he breakfasted on chocolate and brown bread. About 
noon, "someone interfered," said Thoreau, and paid the 
tax. But Thoreau had made his point. 

The foregoing can be described as the negative side 
of his rebelliousness. In his greatest personal document, 
Walden, we find the positive side as well. We also discover 
there the bridge between the negative and positive sides of 
the rebellion. 

In Walden — which is basically an account of a year 
at Walden Pond but which is many other things beyond 
that — he addresses himself to two classes of people. They 
are those who have property and those who have not, or, 
to put it broadly, the rich and the poor. His rich man is 
the Concord landowner, the local farmer, but he stands 
as a symbol for the Boston merchant and the millionaire 
as well. Here is what Thoreau says to the man of property: 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 



I, 

Henry Thoreau, 

do not wish to he regarded as a member 
of any incorporated society which I have not joined 



I SEE YOUNG MEN, MY TOWNSMEN, WHOSE 
MISFORTUNE IT IS TO HAVE INHERITED 
FARMS, HOUSES, BARNS, CATTLE, AND 
FARMING TOOLS; FOR THESE ARE MORE 
EASILY ACQUIRED THAN GOT RID OF. 
BETTER IF THEY HAD BEEN BORN IN THE 
OPEN PASTURE AND SUCKLED BY A WOLF, 
THAT THEY MIGHT HAVE SEEN WITH 
CLEARER EYES WHAT FIELD THEY WERE 
CALLED TO LABOR IN. WHO MADE THEM 
SERFS OF THE SOIL? WHY SHOULD THEY 
EAT THEIR SIXTY ACRES, WHEN MAN IS 
CONDEMNED TO EAT ONLY HIS PECK OF 
DIRT? 

When Thoreau arrived at Walden someone gave him a 
paper-weight. He discovered that it accumulated dust and 
that he would have to keep cleaning it if he wanted to be 
neat. His solution was to dispose of this little piece of 
property. He threw it out and kept the simple life inviolate. 

This, then, is Thoreau on the man of possessions. But is 
he more sympathetic to the poor man, the man who stands 
in Thoreau's own shoes? Far from it. He does not con- 
sider that poverty in itself has any ennobling effect. He 
drives home his point: 

SOME OF YOU, WE ALL KNOW, ARE POOR, 
FIND IT HARD TO LIVE, ARE SOMETIMES, 
AS IT WERE, GASPING FOR BREATH. I HAVE 
NO DOUBT THAT SOME OF YOU WHO READ 
THIS BOOK ARE UNABLE TO PAY FOR ALL 
THE DINNERS WHICH YOU HAVE ACTUALLY 
EATEN, OR FOR THE COATS AND SHOES 
WHICH ARE FAST WEARING OR HAVE AL- 
READY WORN OUT, AND HAVE COME TO 
THIS PAGE TO SPEND BORROWED OR 
STOLEN TIME, ROBBING YOUR CREDITORS 
OF AN HOUR. IT IS VERY EVIDENT WHAT 
MEAN AND SNEAKING LIVES MANY OF YOU 
LIVE, FOR MY SIGHT HAS BEEN WHETTED 
BY EXPERIENCE. 

These salient passages from Walden are, for our 
purposes, the bridge between the negative and the posi- 
tive side of Thoreau's rebellion. He first shows what 
desperately useless lives both the rich and the poor are 
leading. This done, he will show them how to live better; 
and he will do so through a classically artful account of 
his own experience. 



The nature of the positive side of his rebellion is de- 
ceptively plain. Having repudiated the scale of values ol 

his neighbors and his time, he wanted to find out what a 
proper scale of values should be. In this inquiry he had 
a cluster of questions to ask and answers to get. What is 
real and what is not? What is true and what is untrue'.' 
What is good, what is bad? He spent much of his youth 
working his way through these questions. In his late twen- 
ties he withdrew to a cabin besides Walden Pond, near 
Concord, and there he found much for which he had been 
looking. He put both his quest and its results in the book 
called Walden. And from time to time he also lectured 
about it to his townsmen and others. He had something to 
say to any group that would be willing to listen. 

He explained his search and his intention with brilliant 
simplicity. Both the rich and the poor could understand it 
if they wanted to: 

I WENT TO THE WOODS, BECAUSE I WISHED 
TO LIVE DELIBERATELY, TO FRONT ONLY 
THE ESSENTIAL FACTS OF LIFE, AND TO 
SEE IF I COULD NOT LEARN WHAT IT HAD 
TO TEACH, AND NOT, WHEN 1 CAME TO DIE, 
DISCOVER THAT I HAD NOT LIVED. I DID 
NOT WISH TO LIVE WHAT WAS NOT III I . 
LIVING IS SO DEAR; NOR DID I WISH TO 
PRACTICE RESIGNATION, UNLESS IT WAS 
QUITE NECESSARY. I WANTED TO LIVE 
DEEP AND SUCK OUT ALL THE MARROW OF 
LIFE, TO LIVE SO STURDILY AND SPARTAN- 
I.IKE AS TO PUT TO ROUT ALL THAT 
WAS NOT LIFE, TO CUT A BROAD SWATHE 
AND SHAVE CLOSE, TO DRIVE LIFE INTO 
A CORNER, AND REDUCE IT TO ITS LOWEST 
TERMS, AND, IF IT PROVED TO BE MEAN, 
WHY THEN TO GET THE WHOLE AND 
GENUINE MEANNESS OF IT, AND PUBLISH 
ITS MEANNESS TO THE WORLD; OR II- IT 
WERE SUBLIME, TO KNOW IT BY EX- 
PERIENCE, AND BE ABLE TO GIVE A TRUE 
ACCOUNT OF IT IN MY N I N 1 INCURSION. 

To Thoreau most of American living — whether in a 
factory or on a farm — was beside the point. It was almost 
sheer wastefulness. We were occupied with pursuits which 
were at the best needless and at the worst humiliating. 
Because we spent more time at business than anything 
else, business emerged as Thoreau's chief target. Perhaps 
nothing could give a better idea oi the magnitude oi what 



May-June, 1963 



17 







- 



Thoreau was rebelling about than the pronouncement of 
an American president who came after Thoreau but stood 
for the values that Thoreau denied. The president was 
Calvin Coolidge and he declared that "The business of this 
country is business." Thoreau would have hooted at that. 
His retort would have been that the business of this country 
is living, and living in terms of the most important possible 
things to its people. That was why, when Thoreau was 
offered work, was offered things to do, he usually turned 
them down. He talked once about a rich and stupid neigh- 
bor who wanted him to haul stones for a wall. Thoreau 
refused. Why should he waste his time? 

The whole scale of values that he found in his Concord 
neighbors and in the nation affronted him. He argued 
against it again and again, sometimes with irony, some- 
times with compassion, sometimes with ardor. But he 
always remembered to make the general specific. He him- 
self was often the instance for the generalization. For 
example, he will speak about how a village praised a 
businessman who cut down its lovely forest — and yet 
criticized as an idler the man who wished only to walk 
through it. 

But Thoreau is never merely negative. He is eager to 
replace the life he dislikes with a nobler one. And he 
has a pleasantly precise recipe, one designed as much, 
or more, for the reader of today as for the reader of 
Thoreau's time. The kind of prescription that Thoreau 
knows how to give will not age. He begins: 

LET US SPEND ONE DAY AS DELIBERATELY 
AS NATURE, AND NOT BE THROWN OFF THE 
TRACK BY EVERY NUTSHELL AND MOS- 
QUITO'S WING THAT FALLS ON THE RAILS. 
LET US RISE EARLY AND FAST, OR BREAK 
FAST GENTLY AND WITHOUT PERTURBA- 
TION; LET COMPANY COME AND LET COM- 
PANY go; let the bells ring and the 
children cry— (Thoreau was a bach- 
elor) — determined to make a day of 
IT. why should we knock under and 



GO with the stream? let us not be 
upset and overwhelmed in that ter- 
rible rapid and whirlpool called a 
dinner, situated in the meridian 
shallows, weather this danger and 
you are safe, for the rest of the 
way is down hill. with unrelaxed 
nerves, with morning vigor, sail by 
it, looking another way, tied to the 
mast like ulysses. if the engine 
whistles, let it whistle, till it is 
hoarse for its pains. if the bell 
rings, why should we run? we will 
consider what kind of music they 

ARE LIKE. 

This is how to live in our search for reality. 

Once reality has been found, a noble life can be built 
upon it. Thoreau believes that when we discover what is 
real, we can determine what is good and true. After the 
rebellion has been successful a new life can begin. So he 
suggests in the conclusion to Walden. The promise he holds 
out there to his reader is one of the most memorable in 
American letters: 

IF ONE ADVANCES CONFIDENTLY IN THE 
DIRECTION OF HIS DREAMS, AND EN- 
DEAVORS TO LIVE THE LIFE WHICH HE 
HAS IMAGINED, HE WILL MEET WITH A 
SUCCESS UNEXPECTED IN COMMON HOURS. 
HE WILL PUT SOME THINGS BEHIND, WILL 
PASS AN INVISIBLE BOUNDARY; NEW, UNI- 
VERSAL, AND MORE LIBERAL LAWS WILL 
BEGIN TO ESTABLISH THEMSELVES AROUND 
AND WITHIN HIM; OR THE OLD LAWS BE 
EXPANDED, AND INTERPRETED IN HIS 
FAVOR IN A MORE LIBERAL SENSE, AND 
HE WILL LIVE WITH A LICENSE OF A 
HIGHER ORDER OF BEINGS. 



18 



the Maryland Magazine 



Emblematic of Athletic Excellence 
in the Atlantic (hast Conference 



The Carmichael Cup Goes 

to Maryland 




THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND HAS WON THE SECOND 
Carmichael Cup for overall excellence in athletics in 
the Atlantic Coast Conference. 

Awarded for the first time last year, when it was also 
won by Maryland, the Cup is named in honor of the late 
William Carmichael, Jr., former Vice President and Fi- 
nance Officer at the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill and North Carolina State College at Raleigh. Mr. 
Carmichael was greatly interested in all Atlantic Coast 
Conference sports; former Maryland and North Carolina 
football coach, Jim Tatum, was Mr. Carmichael's first 
cousin. The purpose of the Cup is to stimulate competition 
in all Atlantic Coast Conferenct sports. 

The Cup winner is determined by the assigning of points 
according to Conference ranking in each of the 12 Confer- 
ence sports: 

Coast Championship eight points 

First Runnerup seven points 

Second six points 

Third five points 

Fourth four points 

Fifth three points 

Sixth two points 

Seventh one point 



President Elkins receives a plaque commemorating Maryland's 
award of the Carmichael Cup. The Cup is held by William Car- 
michael, III, an advertising executive in Durham. North Carolina. 

In this year's competition, Maryland won champion- 
ships in Lacrosse, Wrestling and Track and finished with 
a total point score of 78. Scores of the other schools in 
the Conference were as follows: Duke, 72; North Carolina, 
69; Virginia, 48; Clemson, 40 Vi; Wake Forest, 39; North 
Carolina State, 37, and South Carolina, 21 1 /2. 

During the 1961-1962 sports year, Maryland won five 
championships: in soccer, swimming, indoor track, out- 
door track and wrestling. Maryland's total point score was 
72. The other schools in the Conference received these 
scores: Duke, 70V6; North Carolina, 67V6; Virginia, 46; 
Clemson, 43; North Carolina State, 39; Wake Forest. 
37 Vi\ and South Carolina, 32 Vi. 

Over the years, Maryland has won six championships 
during the sports year on two separate occasions. No other 
school has ever won more than three in one year. 

There are 12 Conference sports: 



Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


FOOTBALL 


BASKETBALL 


TENNIS 


SOCCER 


WRESTLING 


GOLF 


(ROSS COUNTRY 


SWIMMING 


BASEBALL 




INDOOR TRACK 


01 I DOOR TRU K 
1 VCROSSE 



May-June, 1963 



19 



InSide Maryland SpOrtS by Neil La Bar, Director of Sports Information 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SPRING SPORTS TEAMS 
came through the season with fine records as is their 
custom and we won the Carmichael Cup for the 2nd 
straight year, the only two times the Cup has been 
awarded. 

The Cup is emblematic of overall excellence in sports 
in the Atlantic Coast Conference. 

The Terp track team went undefeated with victories 
over Duke (100-45), North Carolina (113-31) and Navy 
(68-63) plus outstanding performances in the Florida 
Relays, South Carolina Relays, the Penn Relays and 
another smashing victory in the Atlantic Coast Conference 
Meet in Chapel Hill. Coach Kehoe's cindermen scored 
over 100 points in the Conference meet, winning the event 
tor the ninth time in its ten-year history. 

The Terrapin lacrosse team entered the final two matches 
of the year with a 9-2 mark, losing only to Ivy League 
Champion Princeton (13-9) and National Collegiate 
Champion Navy (17-9). The coaching combination of 
Jack Faber and Al Heagy guided the Terps past Kenyon 
(18-4), Cornell (17-10), Harvard (15-5), Virginia (11- 
9), New Hampshire (15-4), Duke (18-1), Baltimore 
(20-1 1 ), Army (11-6) and the Maryland Lacrosse Club 
(17-3). 

Maryland's baseball team ended the season with a 10-12 
record, more wins than last season and a definite trend 
for improvement next year. Coach Jack Jackson's nine 
beat Syracuse (12-1), Georgetown twice (19-4, 18-4), 
Connecticut (5-4), Navy (3-1), South Carolina (8-1), 
Clemson (2-1), Virginia (7-5), North Carolina (1-0) 
and Duke (4-3). Junior righthander John Klvac was a 
definite standout this season with a 6-1 record. 

The Terrapin golf team did an outstanding job this 
Spring, extending their home course string of matches 
without a loss to over 30. Coach Cronin's swingers fin- 
ished a close second to Wake Forest in the Conference 
tournament in Hot Springs, Virginia. The Terp golfers 
downed the Deacons earlier in the season, 15-6. 

In tennis, the Terps finished third in the Conference 
behind powerful North Carolina and Clemson. The Tigers 
edged Coach Royal's netters, 5-4, during the regular sea- 
son. The netters finished the regular season with a 10-3 
mark. 

A LOOK AT SPRING FOOTBALL . . . 

Junior tailback Jerry Fishman could be the surprise of 
the 1963 football season and he would definitely be a 
pleasant surprise. The tailback position in Coach Nugent's 
I formation is a very vital spot in the offense. It is the 
position that requires a good runner. If the tailback 
happens to be a good runner, with size, then naturally 
this could be advantageous to the Terp offense. 

Fishman has the size and is a good runner but can he 
stay sound physically? The East Norwalk, Conn., product 
looked like a potentially great runner as a freshman but 
last season sat out the year with the exception of three 
running plays that covered 14 yards. 



Shiner against Penn State, last year. 




I compare Fishman to the Yankees' Mickey Mantle in 
so far as injuries are concerned. He is so muscular, as is 
Mantle, that he is easily susceptible to muscle pulls in his 
legs and this happened last season although much of 
Fishman's trouble last year was described by doctors as 
calcium deposits in his leg. 

Tailback has been an interesting position this Spring. 
We cannot forget last year's Atlantic Coast Conference 
rushing champion, Len Chiaverini. The twisting, turning 
junior gained 602 yards for the Terps last season on 156 
carries. That averages out to nearly four yards per try, 
good in anyone's league. I know those of you that saw 
Lenny run last year enjoyed his determined squirming and 
diving for extra yardage. 

Tackle Lou Bury was switched to the tailback spot the 
third week of Spring drills and frankly he looked as good 
as any power runner I've seen in a long time. The Balti- 
more junior looked good in the Spring game until Fishman 
replaced him for a rest and Fishman looked so good that 
he stayed in there to gain 148 yards on 26 carries. 

All-America candidate Dick Shiner looked especially 
good, showing he is much quicker than last season in 
running. The fine signal-caller worked very hard all Spring 
and has trimmed down to 182 pounds and could be an 
excellent runner. We know he is one of the best passers 
in collegiate football. 

As you know we lost many fine linemen through gradu- 
ation and the concern is whether the Terps will be good 
enough up front to have another winning season. In the 
7-6 Free Stater win over the Old Liners in the Spring 
game, it looked as though we will be tougher defensively 
than most observers expected before the game. 

The proof will come September 21st in Byrd Stadium 
when the Terps open with tough North Carolina State. 
The Wolfpack returns most of last year's team that was 
one of the toughest the Terrapins met all last season. 

One thing for sure, Coach Nugent will provide us with 
interesting football. 

See you at the opener. 



20 



the Maryland Magazine 




1895-1919 



Waiter D. Munson, Engr. '10, is a 
retired engineer. Mr. Munson lives in 
Southbury, Connecticut. He has four 
children. 

Sidney J. Brown, Phar.D. 12, of 
Jacksonville, Florida, died on Decem- 
ber 12, 1962. 

Murray T. Donoho, ll.b. '17, died 
at his home in Owings Mills, Maryland, 
after a long illness in January, 1963. 
Mr. Donoho was chairman of the board 
of Strayer Business College. He was 68. 

Herman Badenhoop, Jr., ll.b. 12, 
has been retired since 1956. At retire- 
ment, Mr. Badenhoop was the Vice- 
President of the United States Fidelity 
& Guaranty Company of Baltimore. He 
lives in Pasadena, Maryland, and has 
three sons. 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, m.d. '12, 
is a practicing physician. Dr. Goldstein 
is one of our leading urologists. He is 
active in alumni work and is a past- 
president of the Alumni Council. Dr. 
Goldstein lives in Baltimore. 

Dr. William Lurty Baugher, d.d.s. 
'12, is a practicing dentist. He lives in 
Harrisonburg, Virginia. 

Dr. Elbert C. Carpenter, d.d.s. 
'13, is a dentist living in Irvington, New 
Jersey. 

B. Olive Cole, Pharm. '13, is an 
Emeritus Professor of Pharmacy of the 
University of Maryland. Miss Cole re- 
ceived her law degree from the Univer- 
sity in 1923. She is a member of the 
Maryland Bar as well as a registered 
pharmacist in Maryland and Washing- 
ton. Miss Cole lives in Baltimore. 

Richard C. Williams, A&S '14, is 
retired and living in Grosse Point, 
Michigan. He was a chemist with Du 
Pont at the time of his retirement. He 
has two daughters. 

Frank N. Britcher, Pharm. '14, is 
a pharmacist and owner of Britcher & 
Bender in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. 
Mr. Britcher has two daughters. 

Joseph Royal Brunsman, ll.b. '15, 
is a practicing lawyer. He lives in Bal- 
timore, Maryland. 

Dr. Clifton E. Killary, d.d.s. 15, 
is a practicing dentist. The Killarys live 
in Rutland, Vermont. 



Dr. Max K. BaKLOR, d.d.s. '16, is in 
the general practice of dentistry. Dr. 
Bakloi lives in Baltimore. Maryland. 
He has one son. 

REV. and Mrs. Herman M. Wilson, 
ll.b. '17, Educ. '24. live in Gaithers- 
burg, Maryland. Mr. Wilson is the Ad- 
ministrator of the Asbury Methodisl 
Home. Mrs. Wilson is the former Lillian 
lamest. They have four sons 

Preston M. Nash, A&S '17, is re- 
tired after 22 years as H\aminer-in- 
Chief oi a chemical division in the U. S. 
Patent Office. Mr. and Mrs. Nash live 
in St. Petersburg. Florida. 

Dr. Joseph LUCIEN Brown, m.d. 
'IS, retired from Al.R practice in 1949. 
Dr. Brown has three children. He lives 
in Ciadsdcn, Alabama. 

Dr. Martin F. Kocevar, m.d. IX, 
is a physician. He lives in Steelton. 
Pennsylvania. Dr. Kocevar has two 
daughters. 



1920-1929 

Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, m.d. '20. 
is a surgeon and Professor of Clinical 
Surgery at the University of Maryland. 
Dr. Pessagno lives in Baltimore and 
has three children. 

Mrs. Ethelyn Bay Dever, Nurs. 
'20, is retired after serving as a staff 
nurse for the Baltimore City Health 
Department from 1922 to 1960. Mrs. 
Dever lives in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Dr. Rhea Walters Richardson, 
m.d. '20, is a physician living in Macon, 
Georgia. Dr. Richardson has four chil- 
dren. 

Frederick K. Slanker, A&S '21, is 
retired after 35 years of service as an 
attorney with the Internal Revenue 
Service. He received his law degree 
from George Washington University in 
1924. Mr. and Mrs. Slanker live in 
Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Louis B. Slifkin, d.d.s. '21, is 
a practicing dentist. He is an instructor 
of orthodontics at New York University. 
Dr. Slifkin lives in Trenton, New Jersey. 

Mrs. Mildred S. Jones, Educ. '22, is 
employed by the government. She is the 
former Mildred P. Smith. Mrs. Jones 
lives in Arlington, Virginia. She has two 
daughters. 

Allen D. Kemp, A&S '23, is a super- 
vising adjuster with the Travelers Insur- 
ance Company. Mr. Kemp has two 
daughters, both of whom attended 
Maryland. Mr. Kemp lives in Bethesda, 
Maryland. 

Dr. J. B. Silverman, d.d.s. '22, is a 
practicing dentist. Dr. Silverman lives 
in Long Beach. California. He has one 
son. 

Dr. George A. Knipp, m.d. '23, is 
in the general practice of medicine. He 
lives in Baltimore. Maryland. Dr. Knipp 
has one son. 

(Continued on next page) 




'And let's talk about 
your future" 



Most engineers want the same things: good 
pay, stability and, if you're the kind of fellow 
we like to talk to, you want assignments that 
stir your mind. 

GOOD PAY. Where do you stand in the 
educational and experience tables? You'll 
earn accordingly. 

STABILITY. For 77 years Westinghousc 
has been a leader in the scientific field, and 
our far-flung projects have attracted many 
outstanding scientists and engineers. 

STIMULATING ASSIGNMENTS. At 

Westinghouse you'll find research and devel- 
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LASER, advanced weapons systems and 
other challenging fields. 

Pull up a chair . . . and let's have a heart 
to heart talk about your future. 

To arrange an interview call SOuthfield 
1-1000, Ext. 657 or send resume to: 

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DEPT. 404 



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BALTIMORE 

P. 0. Box 1693, 
Baltimore 3, Md. 

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An Equal Opportunity Employer 




w 



May-June, 1963 



21 



Theodore J. Hahn. ll.b. '23, retired 
from the C. & P. Telephone Company 
in 1962 after 37 years of service. He is 
currently serving as a member of The 
Board of Parole and Probation, State 
of Maryland. Mr. Hahn has two sons 
and lives in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Dr. Karl J. Myers, m.d. '23, is a 
radiologist at the Myers Clinic — Broad- 
dus Hospital in Philippi, West Virginia. 
His son and daughter are both physi- 
cians. Dr. Myers boasts 12 grandchil- 
dren. 

Elliott P. Owings, Engr. '23, is a 
Highway Engineer, Chief Contract Con- 
trol Section, Bureau of Materials and 
Research of the State Roads Commis- 
sion. Mr. and Mrs. Owings live in Ell i- 
cott City, Maryland. 

Dr. John Zaslow, m.d. '24, is a 
practicing physician. Dr. Zaslow has 
two sons and lives in Brooklyn, New 
York. 

Marion A. Figinski, ll.b. '24, is in 
the general practice of law. Mr. Figinski 
lives in Baltimore, Maryland. His son, 
Marion Albert, graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Law School in 
1962. 

Hugh Branchard Truitt, ll.b. '24, 
is a practicing lawyer. He and his wife 
live in Baltimore, Maryland. 

W. B. Penn, Agr. '24, has been the 
chief underwriter for Acacia Mutual 
Life Insurance Company for 36 years. 
Mr. Penn has one son and lives in 
Hyattsville, Maryland. 

William Sinsky, ll.b. '25, is a prac- 
ticing lawyer. He lives in Baltimore, 
Maryland. Mr. Sinsky has two daughters. 

Dr. Samuel S. Glick, m.d. '25, is a 
physician specializing in pediatrics. He 
is an Associate Professor, Department 
of Pediatrics at the University of Mary- 
land School of Medicine. Dr. Glick lives 
in Baltimore and has two children. 

John Bowie, Engr. '25, is retired 
after many years of service with the 
U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. He 
and his wife live in Bethesda, Maryland. 

George W. Fogg, A&S '26, is the Di- 
rector of Personnel at the University of 
Maryland. Mr. Fogg lives in College 
Park, Maryland. 

Philip Kramer, Pharm. '26, is the 
owner and President of Kramer's West- 
end Corp. Mr. Kramer lives in Balti- 



more, Maryland. He has two children. 

Dr. Roy H. Bridger, d.d.s. '26, has 
been a dentist with the Montgomery 
County Health Department since 1941. 
Dr. Bridger is the president of the 
Montgomery County Alumni Club of 
the University of Maryland. He and his 
wife live in Silver Spring, Maryland. 

J. D. Morris, Engr. '26. is the Direc- 
tor of Special Services for the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company. He has two 
daughters. Mr. Morris has recently 
moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Edward P. Coblentz, Engr. '26, 
died suddenly on February 20, 1963. 
Mr. Coblentz was the president of Mc- 
Lean Contracting Company of Balti- 
more. 

George M. McCauley, Engr. '26, 
died of a heart attack on April 13, 1963. 
He was the retired marketing supervisor 
for the C & P. Telephone Company. 
He was 61. 

Wade H. Elgin, Jr., Engr. '27, died 
at his home in Bethesda, Maryland, on 
January 13, 1963. Mr. Elgin was super- 
intendent of supplies and motor equip- 
ment for the C. & P. Telephone Com- 
pany. He was 57. 

Frank H. Terhune, A&S '27, is the 
owner of a stationery store in Wake- 
field, Massachusetts. He has one 
daughter. 

Dr. Jacob I. Schwartz, d.d.s. '27, 
is a practicing dentist. Dr. Schwartz has 
two sons. He lives in Bloomfield, New 
Jersey. 

Dr. Joseph W. Wilner, m.d. '27, 
is a physician and surgeon. He is the 
Director of the Wilner Medical Group. 
Dr. Wilner has three children. He lives 
in the Bronx, New York. 

J. Slater Davidson, Jr., Engr. '28, 
is the Manager and Vice President of 
Charles H. Tompkins Co., and an offi- 
cer in several other construction com- 
panies. Mr. Davidson lives in Chevy 
Chase, Maryland. He has two sons. 

Dr. Lewis J. Herold, m.d. '28, is a 
practicing physician. Dr. Herold has two 
sons and lives in Brooklyn, New York. 

Oscar W. Zenitz, ll.b. '29, is a 
practicing lawyer. He and his wife live 
in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Charles Merrick Wilson, Agr. '29. 
is the President of the Wilson Feed 
Company. Mr. Wilson has two daugh- 



ters. He lives in Centreville, Maryland. 

Philip Wertheimer, A&S '29, is a 
partner in a real estate and insurance 
company. He and his wife live in Fred- 
erick, Maryland. 

Dr. Leon C. Grossman, d.d.s. '29, 
is in the general practice of dentistry. 
He lives in Elizabeth, New Jersey. Dr. 
Grossman has two children. 



1930-1939 



Dr. Samuel Reiss, d.d.s. '30, is a 
dentist. He has three sons. Dr. Reiss 
lives in Brooklyn, New York. 

Dr. Isaac Miller, m.d. '30, is a 
practicing physician. He has two chil- 
dren and lives in Baltimore, Maryland. 

John E. McDonald, A&S 30, is the 
Manager of Compound Service of the 
Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company 
of Akron, Ohio. Mr. McDonald has 
three children. He lives in Kent, Ohio. 

Dr. Henry I. Berman, m.d. '31, is 
the Chief of Urology at the V.A. Hos- 
pital in Louisville, Kentucky. The Ber- 
mans live in Louisville. 

Dr. Max Kaufman, m.d. '31, is a 
practicing physician. He lives in Jack- 
son Heights, New York. Dr. Kaufman 
has three children. 

Col. and Mrs. William E. Roberts, 
Engr. '31, H.Ec. '32, live at Fort 
Meade, Maryland. Col. Roberts is the 
Deputy Post Commander at Fort 
Meade. Mrs. Roberts is the former Mary 
H. Wells. They have one daughter. 

George J. Stiffman, Pharm. '31, is 
the owner of a pharmacy in Baltimore. 
He has two sons. Mr. Stiffman lives in 
Baltimore. 

Dr. Joseph G. Diamond, m.d. '32, 
is a practicing physician. He has two 
children and lives in Plainfield, New 
Jersey. 

Dr. R. R. Louft, m.d. '32. is a phy- 
sician in private practice. Dr. Louft has 
four daughters and lives in Charleston, 
West Virginia. 

Dr. Francis Muir, d.d.s. '32, is a 
dentist in private practice. Dr. Muir has 
one daughter and lives in Arlington, 
New Jersey. 



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22 



the Maryland Magazine 



Dr. Jack M. Eskow, d.d.s. '33, is in 

the general practice of dentistry. He has 
two sons. Dr. Eskow lives in Perth Am- 
hoy, New Jersey. 

Dr. Benjamin Mii.i.er, m.d. '33. is 
a physician and Director of Radiology 
Service for the Veterans Administration. 
Dr. Miller has three children. He lives 
in Washington, D. C. 

William Taft Fei dman, i i ,b. '33, 
is a lawyer in private practice. Mr. 
Feldman lives in Baltimore. He has 
four children. 

James Gilbert Busk k, Educ. '33, is 
Superintendent of Schools for Dor- 
chester County, Maryland. Mr. Busick 
has two sons. The Busicks live in Cam- 
bridge, Maryland. 

Dr. George S. Baker, m.d. '33, 
member of the Section of Neurologic 
Surgery of the Mayo Clinic, has been 
elected foreign corresponding member 
of the Italian Society of Neurosurgery. 
He was appointed to the staff of the 
Mayo Clinic in 1939. 

Mrs. Dorothy Griffith Livings, 
A&S '34, is a statistician for Clinical 
Cancer Research at the National Insti- 
tutes of Health. Mrs. Livings has two 
children and lives in W. Hyattsville, 
Maryland. 

Dr. Max Needleman, m.d. '34, is a 
practicing physician. Dr. Needleman 
lives in New York. He has one son. 

Mrs. Gertrude Gregorius Rum- 
panos, Nurs. '34, is a housewife. She 
and her husband, Dr. S. N. Rumpanos, 
live in Mobile, Alabama. They have two 
daughters. 

Milton A. Friedman, Pharm. '34, 
is the owner of a pharmacy in Balti- 
more. He has three children. His daugh- 
ter, Natalie, is a student at the Univer- 
sity. The Friedmans live in Baltimore. 

Stuart J. Burbage, A&S '34, has 
been promoted to auditor for the Del- 
Md-DC Area Accounting Department 
of the Humble Oil and Refining Com- 
pany. Mr. Burbage lives in Severna 
Park, Maryland. He has two daughters. 

Colonel Thomas P. Corwin, A&S 
'35, has assumed command of the Air 
Force Accounting and Finance Center. 
Col. Corwin received his law degree 
from Georgetown in 1942. He has three 
daughters. 

Dr. Donald Krulewitz, d.d.s. '35, 
is a practicing dentist. He has two sons. 
Dr. Krulewitz lives in Passaic. New 
Jersey. 

Edward Kaminski, Engr. '35, is with 
the Electrical Department of the Beth- 
lehem Steel Company. He lives in Bal- 
timore. Mr. Kaminski has three children. 

Charles B. Barker, ll.b. '35, is re- 
tired and living in Hollywood, Florida. 
Mr. Barker was formerly an attorney 
in charge of the Houston, Texas, Claim 
Office of Fidelity & Deposit Co. of 
Maryland. 

Dr. Kenneth G. Horvath, A&S 
'35, is the Principal at Hampstead Hill 

(Continued on next page) 



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May-June, J 963 



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Junior High School and a lecturer at 
Loyola College in Baltimore. Dr. Hor- 
vath received his doctorate in Educa- 
tion from the University of Maryland 
in 1957. He lives in Baltimore and has 
one daughter. 

Dr. Saul Karpel, m.d. '36, is a 
practicing physician and the Associate 
Attending Physician at the Lawrence 
Memorial Hospital in New London, 
Connecticut. Dr. Karpel and his family 
live in New London. He has two chil- 
dren. His son, Joel, is currently attend- 
ing the University of Maryland. 

Dr. Joseph G. Zimring, m.d. '36, is 
a practicing physician. He lives in Long 
Beach, New York. Dr. Zimring has two 
sons. His oldest, Michael, is attending 
the University of Maryland. 

Dr. Samuel A. Leishear, A&S '36, 
is a practicing dentist. He received his 
d.d.s. from Georgetown in 1941. Dr. 
Leishear has two sons and lives in 
Washington, D. C. 

Dr. William Kress, d.d.s. '36, is a 
practicing dentist specializing in Ortho- 
dontics. He lives in Baltimore, Mary- 
land. Dr. Kress has two children. 

Dr. Harold S. Cole, A&S '37, is a 
pediatrician and Associate Professor of 
Pediatrics at New York Medical Col- 
lege. He received his m.d. from N.Y.U. 
College of Medicine in 1942. Dr. Cole 
lives in Rutherford, New Jersey. 

Dr. Jesse J. Greenberg, d.d.s. '37, 
is a practicing dentist. Dr. Greenberg 
lives in Red Bank, New Jersey. He has 
three daughters. 

Dr. Reuben Rochkind, m.d. '37, is 
in the private practice of medicine. Dr. 
Rochkind has three children. The Roch- 
kinds live in Miami, Florida. 

Mrs. Jeanne Solliday Fly, H.Ec. 
Educ. '37, is a housewife. She lives in 
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and has two 
children. 

Dr. Stanley S. Clayman, A&S '38, 
is a practicing dentist. Dr. Clayman re- 
ceived his d.d.s. from Georgetown in 
1942. He has three children and lives 
in Washington. D. C. 

Joseph Lee Combs, Jr., Pharm. '38, 
is a pharmacist and owner of Colonial 
Pharmacy in St. Michaels, Maryland. 
Mr. Combs lives in St. Michaels and 
has two children. 

Sylvan A. Garfunkel, ll.b. '38, is 
the Chief Assistant Solicitor General, 
Eastern Judicial Circuit. Mr. Garfunkel 
lives in Savannah, Georgia. He has three 
children. 

Dr. Benjamin Isaacson, m.d. '39, 
is in the general practice of medicine. 
He lives in Washington, D. C, and has 
three children. 

Clarence A. Eck, Agr. '39, operates 
a wholesale florist shop. Mr. Eck has 
one daughter and lives in Perry Hall, 
Maryland. 

Dk. James Clark Davis, d.d.s. '39, 
is a practicing dentist. He lives in Win- 
chester, Virginia, and has three children. 
James Albert Chappelear, Engr. 



24 



the Maryland Magazine 



'39, is the Manager of the Marine Di- 
vision of Johnson Service Company. 
He lives in Bethesda, Maryland. Daugh- 
ter, Lorraine, is a sophomore at Mary- 
land. 

John Henry Beers, A&S '39, is part 
owner of Beers Bros., Inc., Realtors. He 
lives in Chevy Chase. Mr. Beers has two 
children. 

Dr. Leo J. Shaudis, d.d.s. '39, is a 
practicing dentist. Dr. Shaudis and his 
wife live in Silver Spring, Maryland. 



1940-1949 



Dr. Samuel V. Tompakov, m.d. '40, 
is a practicing physician specializing in 
internal medicine. Dr. Tompakov has 
two children. He lives in Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

John Oliver Herrmann, ll.b. '40, 
is a practicing lawyer and part time 
faculty member at the University of 
Maryland Law School. Mr. Herrmann 
has three sons. He lives in Baltimore. 

Harvey Wilson Kreuzburg, Educ. 
'40, is the Principal of Catonsville 
Senior High School. Mr. Kreuzburg has 
seven children. He lives in Baltimore. 

Joseph S. Merritt, Jr.. Agr. '40, is 
the Treasurer and General Manager of 
Joseph S. Merritt, Inc., Florist. Mr. 
Merritt lives in Dundalk, Maryland. He 
has three children. 

Dr. Daniel Swern, ph.d. '40, has 
been named "Federal Civil Servant of 
the Year" for his outstanding contribu- 
tions to the fundamental chemistry of 
fats. Dr. Swern is a U. S. Department of 
Agriculture chemist. 

J. M. Marzolf, Engr. '40, has re- 
ceived a certificate and first prize by 
the Washington Section of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Electrical Engineers in 
recognition of the paper he presented 
titled, "Tunnel Diode Static Inverter." 
Mr. Marzolf is with the Naval Re- 
search Lab in Washington. 

Dr. Joseph J. Bowen, Jr., m.d. '41, 
died recently of a heart attack while on 
a skiing vacation at the Mohawk Ski 
Area in Cornwall. He was 46. 

Tom Fields, Educ. '41, is a Lt. 
Colonel stationed at Headquarters, 
U.S.M.C. His son, now 8, was born on 
Maryland Day. 

Dr. Christian F. Richter, m.d. '41, 
is a physician specializing in Obstetrics- 
Gynecology. Dr. Richter lives in Balti- 
more, Maryland. He has two children. 

Ralph W. Frey, Jr., BPA '41, is 
Assistant Vice-President of the C. & P. 
Telephone Company. Mr. Frey has 
three children. He lives in Takoma 
Park, Maryland. 

William H. Cole, ll.b. '41, is a 
partner in the firm of Jenkins & Cole, 
Attorneys. Mr. Cole lives in Birming- 
ham, Alabama. He has three children. 

{Continued on next page) 



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John W. Clark, Jr., Engr. '41, is a 
construction superintendent for the 
Turner Construction Company of New 
York. Mr. Clark has two children. He 
lives in Oradell, New Jersey. 

Dr. Warren E. Weaver, Pharm. '42, 
has been elected President of the Vir- 
ginia section of the American Chemical 
Society. Dr. Weaver is Dean of the Med- 
ical College of Virginia's School of 
Pharmacy. 

Seymour D. Wolf, Engr. '42, is 
President and Chairman of American 
Wholesalers, Inc. and subsidiary com- 
panies. Mr. Wolf lives in Chevy Chase, 
Maryland. He has three children. 

Mrs. Carol Remsberg Bare, H.Ec 
'42, is a housewife. She has two chil- 
dren. The Bares live in Manchester, 
Maryland. 

Dr. Theodore Kardash, m.d. '42, 
is a practicing physician. He lives in 
Baltimore. Dr. Kardash has two chil- 
dren. 

William F. Keller, A&S '43, is the 
General Manager and Editor-in-Chief 
of the Blakiston Division of McGraw- 
Hill Book Company. Mr. and Mrs. Kel- 
ler live in Little Silver, New Jersey. 

Dr. T. R. Williams, Jr., m.d. '43, 
is a practicing physician. He has three 
children and lives in Hickory, North 
Carolina. 

Edward H. Steinberg, BPA '43, is 
the Executive Secretary of Kex Na- 
tional Association. Mr. Steinberg lives 
in University Park, Maryland. He has 
one daughter. 

Dr. William H. Pomeroy, m.d. '43, 
is a practicing physician. Dr. Pomeroy 
has four children. He lives in Poquo- 
nock, Connecticut. 

Dr. B. Ralph Hoffman, d.d.s. '44, 
is a practicing dentist. Dr. Hoffman lives 
in Baltimore, Maryland. He has three 
children. 

Dr. and Mrs. Abraham Lilienfeld, 
m.d. '44, A&S '44, live in Baltimore, 
Maryland. Dr. Lilienfeld is a professor 
at Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene 
and Public Health. Mrs. Lilienfeld is 
the former Lorraine Zemil. They have 
three children. 

Helen G. Zepp, Educ. '44, is an 
English teacher at Westminster Junior 
High School. Miss Zepp lives in West- 
minster. 

Dr. John M. Bloxon, m.d. '44, is 
a general surgeon. Dr. Bloxon lives in 
Salisbury, Maryland. He has two chil- 
dren. 

Dr. Harry W. F. Dressel, Jr., d.d.s. 
'45, is a practicing dentist. Dr. Dressel 
lives in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Dr. and Mrs. James R. McNinch, 
Jr., m.d. '45, Nurs. '52, are living in 
Dover, Delaware. Dr. McNinch is a 
general surgeon. Mrs. McNinch is the 
former Carole Jane Sewell. They have 
two sons. 

Koppel Michael Jeffrey, ll.b. '46, 
i> an attorney-at-law. Mr. Jeffrey lives 



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26 



the Maryland Magazine 



in Baltimore, Maryland. He has (luce 
children. 

Dr. David N. Siiis, Jk.. m.d. '4b, 
is a general surgeon. Dr. and Mrs. Sills 
live in Miltord, Delaware. 

Mr. and Mrs. John I. Heise, Jr., 
A&S "47. Educ. '49, are living in Be- 
thesda, Maryland. Mr. Heise is a prac- 
ticing lawyer. Mrs. Heise is the former 
Jacqueline Morley. They have tour 
children. 

Mrs. Leah R. Hardman, Educ. '47, 
is a housewife. Mr. and Mrs. Hardman 
live in Towson, Maryland. 

Dr. Edward Gordon Grau, m.d. 
"47, is a practicing physician. He lives 
in Towson, Maryland. Dr. C i ran has 
three children. 

Donald J. Schuerholz, Engr. '47, 
is a consulting engineer and partner in 
the firm of Miller, SchuerhoL and Gipe. 
Mr. Schuerholz lives in Baltimore, 
Maryland. He has two children. 

James H. Miller, Engr. '48, is a 
civil engineer with Purdum and Jeschke, 
Consulting Engineers of Baltimore. Mr. 
Miller lives in Baltimore. He has three 
daughters. Mrs. Miller is the former 
Sarah Yates, A&S '42. Daughter Susan 
is a freshman at Maryland. 

Col. Robert J. Lynch, m.b.a. '48, 
has recently retired from the U. S. Air 
Force and joined General Precision, 
Inc. as Director of Command-and-Con- 
trol Systems. Col. Lynch lives in New 
Canaan, Connecticut. He has two 
children. 

J. T. Burns, Engr. '48, is a senior 
engineer with the Du Pont Company. 
He has recently been transferred from 
Kinston, North Carolina, to Old Hick- 
ory, Tennessee. He is married and has 
two children. 

Ernest Cleveland Trimble, ll.b. 
'48, is in the general practice of law 
with the firm of Trimble and Alderman. 
Mr. Trimble lives in Towson. He has 
one daughter. 

Mrs. Mona Brown Tillman, Educ. 
'48, is a teacher of Health and Physical 
Education at McKinley High School in 
Washington. Mr. and Mrs. Tillman live 
in College Park, Maryland. 

Dr. Donald I. Mohler, m.d. '48, 
is a physician and surgeon. Dr. Mohler 
lives in Reno, Nevada. He has four 
children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Turyn, BPA 
'49, H.Ec. '49, are living in Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. Mr. Turyn is Assistant Spe- 
cial Agent-in-Charge. F.B.I. Mrs. Turyn 
is the former Eileen Simpson. They 
have four children. 

Rev. William A. Beal, A&S '49, is 
the Rector of St. John's Episcopal 
Church in Chevy Chase, Maryland. Mr. 
Beal is a former chaplain at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. He and his wife live 
in Chevy Chase. They have three 
children. 

John D. Emler, Engr. "49, is a senior 
park engineer with the Maryiand-Na- 
(Continued on next page) 




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Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

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6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24. Md. 



American Disinfectant Co. 

Pesf Control Service And Products 
928 EYE STREET. N.W. 

Washington 1, D. C. NAtional 8-6478 



May-June, 1963 



27 



The gathering place for 
Marylanders of Good Taste 




DUKE ZEIBERT'S 

RESTAURANT 
1722 L Street 

(Two doors west of Conn. Ave.) 

STerling 3-1730 

Open 'til Midnight— Sunday 'til 10 p.m. 



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8 1 5 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



tional Park and Planning Commission. 
Mr. Emler lives in Takoma Park. 

Dr. Homer W. May, m.d. '49, is a 
practicing physician. Dr. May has two 
children. He lives in Bedford, Pennsyl- 
i vania. 

Preston E. Flohr, BPA '49, is the 
President-Treasurer of the Flohr Lum- 
ber Company. Mr. Flohr lives in Blue 
Ridge Summit, Pennsylvania. He has 
two daughters. 

Esther Frank Siegel, Educ. '49, 
is the Chief, Housing Application Office, 
Baltimore Urban Renewal and Housing 
Agency. Miss Siegel lives in Baltimore. 

Robert E. Gralley, b.s. '49, has 
been promoted by Mutual of New York 
to administrative assistant at the com- 
pany's home office in New York. Mr. 
and Mrs. Gralley live in Plainview, New 
York. They have three children. 



1950-1959 



R. Bruce Drake, BPA '50, has been 
promoted to the position of division 
sales manager for the Washington area 
of the Reuben H. Donnelley Telephone 
Directory Company. The Drakes and 
their three children live in Bethesda, 
Maryland. 

Richard R. Dorney, BPA '50, has 
been appointed area cost and distribu- 
tion supervisor, Chicago area, for the 
Humble Oil and Refining Company. 
The Dorneys have three children. 

Dr. Robert J. Kirvin, d.d.s. '50, is 
a practicing dentist. Dr. Kirvin lives in 
Pittsfield, Massachusetts. He has three 
children. 

Alvin S. Bernstein, A&S '50, is a 
pharmacist. Mr. Bernstein received a 
degree in pharmacy from George Wash- 
ington University in 1953. He lives in 
Bethesda, Maryland, and has two 
children. 

William M. Harrington, Jr., Engr. 
'50, is an assistant project engineer with 
Whitman, Requardt & Associates of Bal- 
timore. Mr. Harrington lives in Pasa- 
dena, Maryland. He has three children. 

Margaret V. Herbert, Nurs. '50, is 
assistant supervisor in the operating 
room at the George Washington Uni- 
versity Hospital in Washington, D. C. 
Miss Herbert lives in Seat Pleasant, 
Maryland. 

Dr. John C. Hyle, m.d. '50, is a 
practicing physician. Dr. Hyle lives in 
Baltimore. He has seven children. 

Dr. Roland Vincent Reed, Jr., 
d.d.s. '51, is a practicing dentist. He lives 
in Wilmington, Delaware. Dr. Reed has 
two children. 

Albert M. Newman, Pharm. '51, 
is a practicing pharmacist. He lives in 
Havre De Grace, Maryland. Mr. New- 
man has four children. 

Geneva Dunn, p.e. '51, is the de- 
partment head of girl's physical educa- 



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Student's Supply Store 

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Headquarters for 

• CLASS RINGS 

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Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



28 



the Maryland Magazine 



tion at Chichester High School in 
Pennsylvania. Miss Dunn lives in New- 
town Square, Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Edith W. Perkins, Educ. '51, 
is a housewife living in Torring, Con- 
necticut. Mrs. Perkins has one child 
with another one due in April. 

James B. Rowland, A&S '51, is a 
reporter for the Washington / i ening 
Star. Mr. Rowland lives in West Hyatts- 
ville, Maryland. 

Edward K. Bender, m.s. Agr. '51, 
is an agriculturist for the American 
Cyanamid Company. Mr. Bender has 
one son and lives in Silver Spring, 
Maryland. 

Dr. Charles W. McGrady, m.d. '51, 
is a practicing physician. He lives in 
Pompano Beach. Florida. Dr. Mc- 
Grady has three children. 

James R. Bookstaver, Engr. '52, 
has been promoted to assistant to the 
manager. Product Engineering o( IBM, 
in Endicott, New York. 

Mrs. Lois Atkinson Mast, Educ. 
'52, is a housewife living in Temper- 
ance, Michigan. Mrs. Mast received her 
master's degree in 1958 from the Uni- 
versity. She has three children. 

Dr. and Mrs. Clayton S. McCari , 
A&S '52, Educ. '52. live in College 
Park, Maryland. Dr. McCari is a prac- 
ticing dentist. He received his d.d.s. 
from the University of Maryland in 
1956. Mrs. McCari is the former Jane 
Mooney. The McCarls have four 
children. 

David Duane Patton, BPA '52, is 
a practicing attorney. He and his wife 
live in Baltimore, Maryland. Mr. Pat- 
ton received his law degree in 1955. 

William Herbert Layman, p.e. '52, 
is an organizational coordinator with 
the Industrial Union Department of the 
AFL-CIO. Mr. Layman lives in River- 
dale, Maryland. He has four children. 

Dr. Howard N. Weeks, m.d. '52, is 
in the private practice of medicine. Dr. 
Weeks lives in Hagerstown, Maryland. 
He has two children. 

Enoch L. Harlan, Jr., U.C. '52, is 
a fire prevention engineer and manager 
of the district office of an insurance 
company. Mr. Harlan has four children. 
He lives in Monkton, Maryland. 

Mrs. Martha Jennison Shelkey, 
A&S '52, is a housewife living in Dahl- 
gren, Virginia. Mrs. Shelkey is a former 
supervisory mathematician with the 
U. S. Naval Weapons Lab. She has one 
son. 

Dr. and Mrs. M. Paul Nestor, A&S 
'53, BPA '53, live in Tampa, Florida. 
Dr. Nestor received his d.d.s. from the 
University of Maryland in 1957 and 
is a practicing dentist. Mrs. Nestor is 
the former Mabelle Beck. The Nestors 
have two daughters. 

Dr. Leslie R. Miles, Jr., m.d. '53, 
is a practicing physician. Dr. Miles lives 
in Lonaconing, Maryland. He has three 
children. 

(Continued on next page) 




SEARS 

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Class of '63 



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May-June, 1963 



29 



McLeod 6t Romborg 

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LA 31551 LA 3-1552 

ARISTOCRAT 

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Del Haven White House Motel 

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J. H. F. 



BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 

PLANT: 621-27 G STREET. N.W. REpublic 7-5400 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVILLE, MD. WArfleld 7-0880 



Mrs. Sarah Gardner Johnson, A&S 
'53, is a housewife living in Bethesda, 
Maryland. Mrs. Johnson has two 
children. 

Mrs. Jane Short Grube, p.e. '53, 
is the head of the Department of Phy- 
sical Education at Walter Johnson High 
School. Mrs. Grube lives in Bethesda, 
Maryland. 

George A. Houdeshel, BPA '53, is 
the assistant to C-130 Project Manager 
of the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation 
in Marietta, Georgia. Mr. Houdeshel 
lives in Smyrna. Georgia. He has two 
sons. 

Ruthellen Hammer, ll.b. '53, is 
engaged in actuarial work. Miss Ham- 
mer lives in New York. 

Stanley H. Raffel, Engr. '53, is a 
senior engineer with Westinghouse Elec- 
tric Corp. Mr. Raffel lives in Baltimore, 
Maryland. He has three children. 

Lowell H. Reed, Agr. '53, is a Field 
Support Officer for U. S. AID. Mr. Reed 
has two sons. He is stationed overseas. 

Sheldon Philip Cohen, ll.b. '54, 
is a partner in the accounting firm of 
Burke, Lansberg and Gerber. Mr. Cohen 
lives in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Mrs. Marilyn Smith Hooper, Educ. 
'54, is a housewife living in Cocoa, 
Florida. Mrs. Hooper is a former 
teacher in Washington. She has two 
children. 

Mrs. Lynn Paula Ribnitzki Smith, 
A&S '54, is a housewife. Mrs. Smith 
has one daughter and lives in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Paul M. Baylor, Engr. '54, is a 
technical representative with Minneapo- 
lis-Honeywell Regulator Co. Mrs. Bay- 
lor, the former Patricia E. Baker, grad- 
uated in A&S '55. The Baylors live in 
Falls Church, Virginia. 

Gerald A. Yager, BPA '54, is an 
Advance Procurement Planner for the 
U. S. Navy Department. Mr. Yager 
lives in Silver Spring, Maryland. He has 
three children. 

Dr. Raymond B. Keefe, m.d. '54, 
is a physician specializing in pediatrics. 
Dr. Keefe lives in Windsor, Connecti- 
cut. He has four daughters. 

Roy Dodson Porter, Agr. '54, is a 
County Agriculture Agent with the Ex- 
tension Service of the University of 
Maryland. Mr. and Mrs. Porter live 
in Chevy Chase, Maryland. 

John D. Rohrer. BPA '54, has been 
promoted to Senior Associate Program- 
mer, DCA Programming Dept., Com- 
munications Systems of IBM. 

Francis A. Griffith, A&S '55, has 
been awarded a scholarship by the Amer- 
ican Speech and Hearing Foundation. 
Mr. Griffith received his master's de- 
gree from Penn State in 1961 in clinical 
speech. 

Dr. Elizabeth R. Duff, ed.d. '55, 
was honored on March 12, 1963, at an 
Honorary Assembly at Glassboro State 
College for her serv;;e and dedication 
to teaching and the i.tudents of the 



30 



the Maryland Magazine 



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college. Dr. Dull is on the facultj ol 
the Education Department. 

Daniel Makkowii/. I due. '55, lias 
been appointed city manager ol Hen/ 

truck operations in Baltimore. \l.n\ 
land. Mr. MarkowitZ started with the 
Hertz Company in [958. He is man led 
and lives in Kails Church. Virginia. 

Dr. Joseph Ron Wiebm sh, ph.d. '55, 
is an Associate Professor. Chemistry, at 
the U. S. Naval Acadeim in Annapolis. 
Dr. Wiebush lives m Silver Spring. 
Maryland. He has one son. 

Donald W. Swain. BPA '55. his 
been a sales representative since grad- 
uation. Mr. Swain lives in Hyattsville, 
Maryland. He has one daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. E. Spies, 
A&S "55. A&S "59, live in Washington, 
D. C. Mr. Spies is a stockbroker with 
the Francis I. du Pont Co. Mrs. Spies 
is the former M. Evelyn Dean. They 
have one son. 

Dr. John Peter McGowan, m.i>. 
'55. is a physician and Deputy Chief. 
Pathology, at USPMS Hospital in Bal- 
timore. Dr. McGowan lives in Rose- 
dale, New York. He has four children. 

Mrs. Shirley Brown Teffeau, 
Nurs. '55, is a housewife living in 
Hughesville, Maryland. Mrs. Teffeau is 
a former staff nurse at Prince Georges 
General Hospital. She has three chil- 
dren. 

Lt. Col. C. R. Glasebrook, Mil. 
Sci. '55, is a career officer in the U. S. 
Air Force. He is stationed at Wright- 
Patterson AFB and is Chief of Plans 
and Policy Division, Foreign Tech- 
nology Division. He lives in Dayton, 
Ohio. Col. Glasebrook has three 
children. 

William Donald McInnis, p.e. '55, 
is the manager of the M. & J. Finance 
Corp. Mr. McInnis lives in Monroe, 
North Carolina. He has one son. 

Dr. Ronald Murray Lauer, d.d.s. 
'55, is a practicing dentist. He lives in 
Murray Hill, New Jersey, and has two 
sons. 

Jabez Whitford Loane, IV, it .b. 
'56, is a captain in the U. S. Army. 
Capt. Loane's home is in Baltimore, 
Maryland. He has three children. 

Mrs. Caroline Esther C. Lister, 
Nurs. '56, is a private duty nurse. She 
is married to Dr. John Lister and lives 
in the Bronx, New York. 

Philip D. Lindeman, Pharm. '56, is 
a registered pharmacist working for 
Salisbury Drugs. Mr. Lindeman lives 
in Salisbury, Maryland. He has three 
children. 

Walter W. Kirk, Jr., BPA '56, is 
a staff accountant with James L. Rim- 
ler, C.P.A. Mr. Kirk lives in Frederick, 
Maryland. 

Dr. Andrew Federico, d.d.s. '56, is 
an oral surgeon. He lives in Lodi, New 
Jersey. Dr. Federico has one son. 

Joseph John Perrone, Jr., BPA '56, 
is a life insurance underwriter for Penn 

(Continued on next page) 



IN the MARYLAND SEGMENT 

of GREATER WASHINGTON 

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May-June, 1963 



31 



Mutual Life. Mr. Perrone lives in Bal- 
timore. Maryland. 

Col. Arnold P. Murr, Mil.Sci. '56, 
is a career Army officer. Col. Murr is 
Chief. Reserve Components Division, 
Adjutant General's Section, Hq., Third 
U. S. Army. Col. Murr is stationed at 
Ft. McPherson. Georgia. He has three 
children. 

Elmer Lewis Cooper, Agr. '56, 
teaches vocational agriculture in high 
school. Mr. Cooper lives in Whiteford, 
Maryland. He has three children. 

Joseph Gentile, A&S '56, has been 
appointed a field claim representative 
of the Falls Church, Virginia, office of 
the State Farm Mutual Auto Insurance 
Co. He lives with his wife and two 
children in Woodbridge, Virginia. 

Richard H. Miller, m.b.a. '57, 
died suddenly on December 10, 1962. 
Mr. Miller lived in Philadelphia. 

William R. Schindler, A&S '57, 
Project Manager for the Delta space 
booster vehicle at the Goddard Space 
Flight Center, and his staff received the 
NASA Group Achievement Award at 
Cape Canaveral in March. The award 
was presented in recognition of Schind- 
ler's work in making the Delta Amer- 
ica's most reliable space vehicle. Also 
participating in the group award were 
Louis J. Ratcliffe, Engr. '58, Frank M. 
Piszkin, Engr. '59, and Walter R. Nagel, 
Engr. '61. 



ROUND-THE-WORLD 



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Lawrence R. Holter, Engr. '57, is 
a Senior Engineer with Standard Oil 
Company. Mr. Holter has one daughter 
and lives in Lima, Ohio. 

Mrs. Mary Lee Hudes Cantor, 
Educ. '57, is a housewife living in Rich- 
mond, Virginia. Mrs. Cantor has one 
son. 

John Charles Goossens, ph.d. A&S 
'57, is a research chemist. Dr. Goossens 
lives in Scotia, New York. He has three 
children. 

Mrs. Betty Rhoderick Bures,H.Ec. 
'57, is a housewife living in Cooksville. 
Maryland. Mrs. Bures is married to 
Marvin G. Bures and has two children. 

Luther A. Brown, Jr., U.C. '57, is 
a mechanical engineer at the U. S. Naval 
Propellant Plant, Indian Head, Mary- 
land. Mr. Brown has two children and 
lives in Oxon Hill, Maryland. 

Francis L. Bruno, BPA '57, is a 
tax supervisor. He lives in Leonia, New 
Jersey, and has two sons. 

Martha Ruth Calvert, A&S '58, 
is a housewife. She and her two children 
have recently moved to Westminster, 
California, to be with her husband, Wil- 
liam R. Calvert, an officer in the Navy. 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. De- 
Grafft, Jr., Engr. '58, H.Ec. '58, live 
in Annapolis, Maryland. Mr. DeGrafft 
is an Aerospace Engineer at the Naval 
Ordnance Lab. Mrs. DeGrafft is the 
former Joanne Eileen Danner. They 
have one son. 

Robert Davison Mowery, Educ. 
'58, is the Safety Coordinator at Johns 
Hopkins Applied Physics Lab. Mr. 
Mowery lives in Bowie, Maryland. He 
has two sons. 

George Allan Smalley, Jr., Engr. 
'58, is an Associate Technical Service 
Engineer with the American Oil Com- 
pany. Mrs. Smalley is the former Mar- 
garet L. Kline, Educ. '58. They live in 
Texas City, Texas, and have one 
daughter. 

William T. Geiger, Sr., BPA '58, 
is Coordinator of Manufacturing of the 
Durapak Manufacturing Company of 
Baltimore. Mr. Geiger lives in Towson, 
Maryland. He has two sons. 

Thurston Maurice Gillenwater, 
Mil.Sci. '58, is an engineering group 
leader for the R.C.A. Service Company 
of Alexandria, Virginia. Mr. Gillen- 
water retired from the Navy in 1957. 
He lives in Arlington, Virginia, and has 
two children. 

Edward J. Holoka, A&S '58, is the 
secretary of District No. 4 of the Na- 
tional Association of Securities Dealers, 
Inc. Mr. Holoka lives in Kansas City, 
Missouri. He has one son. 

Capt. Robert M. Johnson, d.d.s. 
'58, is Assistant to Chief of Oral Sur- 
gery at the Landstuhl Army Medical 
Center in Germany. Dr. Johnson was 
formerly stationed in Metz, France. 

Joyce F. Kaetzel, Nurs. '58, is an 
Instructor in Maternal and Child Nurs- 
ing. Miss Kaetzel received her m.s. from 



the University in 1959. She lives in 
Baltimore, Maryland. 

James B. Holter, m.s. '59, received 
his doctor of philosophy degree from 
Pennsylvania State University at Com- 
mencement Exercises on March 23, 
1963. 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Clark, 
Engr. '59, H.Ec. '59, live in College 
Park, Maryland. Mr. Clark is an Asso- 
ciate Highway Engineer with the Mont- 
gomery County Department of Public 
Works. Mrs. Clark is the former Eleanor 
Janet Munsey. The Clarks have one son. 

Francis Joseph Logan, Engr. '59, 
is a research engineer at NASA. Mr. 
Logan lives in College Park, Maryland. 
He has three children. 

Mrs. Patricia Dalton Unger, A&S 
'59, is a housewife living in Greenbelt. 
Maryland. Mrs. Unger is married to 
John F. Unger and has two children. 

James Frank Trawick, U.C. '59, is 
a Senior Specialist with the International 
Electric Corporation. He is also a retired 
Navy Commander with more than 20 
years' service. Mr. Trawick lives in 
Ramsey, New Jersey. He has three 
children. 

Mrs. Carol Kornblau Horkitz, 
Educ. '59, is a housewife living in New 
Gardens, New York. Mrs. Horkitz has 
one daughter. 

Thomas H. King, Jr., A&S '59, is a 
television production cameraman. Mr. 
King lives in Charlotte, North Carolina. 



THE SIXTIES 



Capt. Richard Frederick Ma- 
haney, U.C. '60, is a U. S. Air Force 
officer and Associate Professor of Air 
Science at Louisiana State University. 
Capt. Mahaney lives in Baton Rouge 
and has three children. 

Lt. Col. James H. Cawthra, U.C. 
'60, is a career Army officer. He is cur- 
rently at the Army War College. Col. 
Cawthra received his m.a. from Amer- 
ican University in 1962. He has two 
children. 

Mrs. Thomas K. Burk, Jr., H.Ec. 
'60, is a housewife in Brunswick, 
Georgia. Mrs. Burk's maiden name was 
Donaldson. Her husband, Capt. Thomas 
K. Burk, Jr., is a captain in the U. S. 
Marine Corps. 

Dr. Donald Brown, m.d. '60, is a 
resident physician at Henry Ford Hos- 
pital. Dr. and Mrs. Brown live in De- 
troit, Michigan. 

Duane R. Garrett, Educ. '60, died 
in the line of duty on January 24, 1963, 
when his Navy jet fighter crashed into 
the sea during exercises off San Diego. 
Only after extensive search by the Navy 
was wreckage sighted and the young 
pilot reported lost. 

Lt. John H. Shock, Engr. '60, was 
one of two nominees from the Air Force 



32 



the Maryland Magazine 



Electronic Systems Division tor the 
United States Air Force Research and 
Development award, for outstanding 
duty performance and major contribu- 
tion to the research and development 
program. Lt. Shock, his wife and three 
sons live in West Acton, Massachusetts. 

Frank V. Costan/.a, U.C". '60, has 
been promoted to Development Engi- 
neer, 466L Site Assistance Manager. 
Far East Intelligence Systems of IBM. 

Wii.i.iam C. Austin, Jr.. BPA '60, 
is Assistant to the Secretary. Washing- 
ton Suburban Sanitary Commission. 
Mr. and Mrs. Austin live in Bethesda, 
Maryland. 

David Bruce Fitzgerald, A&S '60, 
is working as a technical writer. He 
lives in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Harold Francis Ford, Agr. '60, is 
a lab technician and chemist. He and 
his wife live in Mt. Rainier, Maryland. 

Paul W. Hocheder, BPA '60, is 
working as a cost analyst. Mr. Hocheder 
has two children and lives in Ellicott 
City, Maryland. 

Charles G. Kluge, Educ. '60, is a 
sales engineering trainee with Otis Ele- 
vator Company. Mr. Kluge lives in 
Haddonfield, New Jersey. He has one 
son. 

William B. Lane, Jr., A&S '60, is 
a seminarian at Virginia Theological 
Seminary in Alexandria, Virginia. 

Roy James Hendricks, Educ. '60, 
has been appointed Administrative As- 
sistant in the U. S. Department of Com- 
merce Coast and Geodetic Survey. 

William P. Morgan. Phy.Ed. '61, 
has been promoted to Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Physical Education at the Uni- 
versity of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio. 

Charles A. Cockey, BPA '61, has 
been appointed as director of public 
relations at Washington College in 
Chestertown, Maryland. Mr. Cockey 
and his wife will be living in Chester- 
town. 

John E. White, U.C. '61, has recently 
accepted appointment as Education Ad- 
viser of the TUSLOG base in Ankara, 
Turkey. Mr. White was formerly an 
Air Force Education Adviser in Japan. 

Major Robert S. Gordanier, U.C. 
'61, is a career Army officer currently 
assigned as Signal Corps Liaison Officer 
at the Department of State. Major Gor- 
danier lives in Woodbridge, Virginia. 
He has two children. 

Dr. Ronald Howard Israel, d.d.s. 
'61, is a dentist and captain in the U. S. 
Air Force. Capt. and Mrs. Israel live 
in Biloxi, Mississippi. 

Barbara A. Fulkersin, p.e. '61, is 
a teacher. Miss Fulkersin lives in Arling- 
ton, Virginia. 

Terrence P. Daly, BPA '61, is the 
Assistant Supply Supervisor, 113th 
A.T.D. DCANG, Andrews Air Force 
Base. Mr. Daly lives in Washington, 
D. C. 

Ronald Leon Johnson, A&S '61, 
is continuing the study of psychology 



at Michigan State. He lives in I asl I EM 
sing. Michigan. 

Mrs. Barbara Burdi mi Ki i\. i due, 

'61. is a housewife living in ["opeka, 
Kansas. Mrs. Kli\ is married to Richard 
T. Kli\ and has one daughter. 

Ai i \\ S. I EVY, A&S '61, is continu- 
ing his studies at the Universit) ol 
Maryland Law School. Mr. I evj lives 
in Baltimore. 

PHI! ii' I . Ma< k i I . Agr. '61. is an 
agricultural statistician with the Md.- 
Del. Crop Reporting Service. Mr. Mac- 
kie has two children. He lives in Hyatts- 
ville, Maryland. 

Patricia L. Sullenberger, Nurs. 
'61, m.nurs. '62. is an Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Psychiatric Nursing at the 
Medical College of Virginia. Miss Sul- 
lenberger lives in Richmond, Virginia. 

Phillip P. Weiner, Pharm. '61. is 
a practicing pharmacist. He has one 
son and lives in Baltimore. Maryland. 

James F. Hoag, Jr., Engr. '62, is a 
mechanical engineer. He and his wife 
live in Edgewater, Maryland. 

Bernard S. Heiman. A&S '62. is 
attending the University of Maryland 
Law School. Mr. Heiman lives in Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

Mrs. Nancy Nicodemus Green- 
wood, Educ. '62, is the Vice Principal 
and a teacher at Lewistown Elementary 
School. She has one son and lives in 
Walkersville, Maryland. 

John C. Hoffman, II, Engr. '62, is 
a Polaris Engineer with Sperry Gyro- 
scope. Mr. Hoffman lives in New Hyde 
Park, New York. 

Mrs. Virginia Seibel Houchen, 
Educ. '62, is a teacher in Prince Georges 
County. Mrs. Houchen has two children 
and lives in Washington, D. C. 

Franklin L. Johnson, A&S '62, is 
attending the University of Maryland 
Medical School. Mr. Johnson lives in 
Baltimore, Maryland. 

Lt. and Mrs. Allan B. Pertnoy, 
d.d.s. '62, A&S '58, are living in Indian- 
apolis, Indiana. Dr. Pertnoy is in the 
U. S. Army Dental Corps. Mrs. Pertnoy 
is the former Sandra Kalin. 

Phillip V. Johnson, BPA '62, is in 
the sales department of Phillips Petrol- 
eum Company. He lives in Hyattsville, 
Maryland. 

Dr. Bernard S. Karpers, Jr., m.d. 
'62, is serving as an intern at University 
Hospital. Dr. Karpers lives in Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Dr. Ronald Louis Klimes, m.d. '62, 
is serving as an intern. He and his wife 
live in York, Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Iona M. Pettengill, Nurs. 
'62, is a Public Health Nurse with the 
Virginia Health Department. She and 
her husband live in Williamsburg, Vir- 
ginia. 

Katherine E. White, p.e. '62, is a 
volunteer with the Peace Corps and 
will be serving in West Africa until 
July 1964. Miss White's home is in 
Silver Spring, Maryland. 



Directors of Advertisers 



Ai <"• 1 i ii ','. : 

Ale. i/. ii 3| 

Am. i : i ,..i i 

iph 

« omp ii 

Anchoi Pb»l Pn tt Co., 

• ' 5 ip| j I 

Arundi I I ■• di i il Saving! & Loan • 

Baltimon Env< lopi < o 
Bard \ t •■■ 5< boo! 

Bi mi '« Laundrj 

Bi thi ida « indi i Bio Ic Mfg ti 

ii"ii I on Food Prodm tt 

Bri Cons) tion Co., Inc. 24 

E Carroll & Son .31 

1 1 11,11 . i hambi ra, I Iptii 

\ ictor Cushwa & Sons 24 



Del Haven White House Motel 

Embassy Dairy 

Fai mi i s I 'oop< rative Assn, 

I. II Filbert I o. 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 

Fuller & d'Albert, Inc. 



Albert I'', Gortze Packing ('■>. 
Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 



Harvey Dairy 
Hotel Harrington 



Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc.. 

Kiiiy; Bros., Inc 

E. II Koester Bakery Co. 



John D. Lucas Printing Company 
Lustine Chevrolet 



Macke Vending Machines . 

Mana's Restaurant 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co. 
Modern Machinists Co 



McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc. 

North Washington Press, Inc 

Norman Motor Company, Inc 



Occidental Restaurant 

( He- Envelope Corp. 

( Ittenberg's Bakei -. I nc, 



Park Transfer Co. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co., Inc. . . . 

Sears 

Seidenspinner Realtor 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co.. . . 
Mrs. Smith's Colonial Baking Co. 

Strayer College 

Student's Supply Store 

Suburban Trust Co 

Sweetheart Bread 



Thomsson Steel Co., Inc. 



Wallop \- Sou, Insurance 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange Inc. 
Westinghouse Electric Corp. . . 

Perry ( *. Wilkinson 

Williams Construction Company. Inc. 

J. McKenny Willis & Sons, Inc. 

Windjammer Cruises 



York Wholesaler-. Inc. 



Duke /cilicrt'- Restaurant 



27 

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30 
26 
28 

31 
27 

31 
26 

32 
26 

27 

29 
24 

24 
30 
31 
24 

30 

24 
23 

22 
29 
26 



28 
23 
29 
26 
25 
28 
30 
28 
31 
23 

29 

25 
30 
_'l 
23 
25 
23 
32 

28 








Dictionary refers R. Ketchledge, Director of the Bell System's Electronic Switching 
Laboratory, to faulty components in a model of the electronic switching system. 

g new telephone switching system is its own "doctor 



JO transistors and 45,500 diodes in the heart 
II Telephone electronic switching system. 

ny components fail, finding them is easy. 

>ecause Bell experts have given the system a 
.h can tell what's wrong with itself. 

, more, the system can indicate where the cure 
. ilure can be found in a 1295-page "medical dic- 
which it authored itself! 

Bell System developed this new system for 
its first commercial Electronic Central Office 



which will begin operation in Succasunna, N. J., in 1965. 

Bell engineers estimate that the system's mind and 
dictionary will locate 90% of all failures that might de- 
velop at Succasunna. 

This will assure the great reliability needed for new, 
super-fast electronic telephone switching. 

Ingenuity to the nth degree is demanded for the ex- 
treme reliability needed in today's communications. It's 
a challenge we welcome in providing continually improv- 
ing service for you. 




Bell Telephone System 

Owned by more than two million Americans 



Volume XXXV Number Four • July-August 1963 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 




magazine 









■ 








' 


. 




















; 








.;• 








'. 




':■'•' ■ 




■:-. 








■ 










. 









■ 













■$.*&>?■ 




the 




magazine 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXV Number 4 



INrlarylancl 




The Cover: In a Commencement extravagant with color and motion, the 
University sent 3,337 students to worldly endeavor. For most graduates 
this would he their last physical contact with the University, but some 
would return as graduate students and all would periodically receive infor- 
mational bulletins and letters. Across the land, in 1.200 colleges and uni- 
versities, the event was repeated. If you were to multiply by 161 the 
number of University of Maryland degrees awarded — 3.337 — you could 
determine the total number of degrees awarded this summer in the United 
States — 535.000. With dignity and purpose the University celebrated 
for the 151st time the reason for its existence. 



3 
8 

10 
11 
12 
15 
20 
21 



The One-Hundred and Fifty-First Commencement 

Commencement Address of the Vice President of 
the United States 



David Brigham Resigns 
The Alumni Diary 

Alumni and Campus Notes 

Medicine, U. S. A. — The American Exhibit in 
the U. S. S. R. 

Inside Maryland Sports 



Through the Years 



BOARD OF REG ENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK. Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 

HARRY H. NUTTLE. Treasurer 

LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

RICHARD W. CASE 

DR. WILLIAM B. LONG, M.D. 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 

WILLIAM C WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 

DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFJCE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 

OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

DR. EDWARD D. STONE, '25, President 

MRS. ERNA R. CHAPMAN, '34, Vice-President 

THE HONORABLE JOSEPH L. CARTER, '25, Vice-President 

DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 

VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
MRS. BARBARA HARRIGAN, Assistant Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



ADVERTISI NG DIR ECTORS 

MRS. H. B. GILLESPIE 
411 Range Road 
Baltimore 4, Md. 
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RICHARD F. ROSS 
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Baltimore 12. Md. 
435-6767 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park, Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March 3 1879. $3.00 per year Fifty cents the copy Member of American Alumni Council. 




The 

One-Hundred and Fifty-First 

Commencement 



THE NATION AND THE UNIVERSITY HAVE GRADUATED 
their largest classes. American colleges and uni- 
versities granted degrees to 535,000 men and 
women; the University of Maryland conferred de- 
grees on 3,337 members of the Class of 1963 — 0.62 per- 
cent of the total American degrees granted. 

For the new graduates, salaries continue to rise. For 
graduates with a Bachelor degree, salaries are three to five 
percent higher in most fields than last year. The range is 
considerable, however. Most new graduates will receive 
between $4,500 and $7,200 in their starting positions, 
depending upon the demand f or their specialties, class 
standing and other individual characteristics and achieve- 
ments, and upon the type of industry. 

From rain-filled skies, a Commencement audience of 
approximately 12,000 entered the main auditorium of the 
Cole Activities Building. The auditorium was aglow with 
light; greenery and colorful flags and bunting created the 
traditional ceremonial effect. 

The solemn processional moved to the strains of the 
March from Tannhauser by Wagner, and then the Rev- 
erend Jesse W. Myers, Presbyterian Chaplain at the Uni- 
versity, delivered the Invocation. 

Greetings were extended by Governor J. Millard Tawes 
who told the graduates: "The State is very proud of you 



for your accomplishments"'; and Charles P. McCormick. 
Chairman of the University Board of Regents who said: 
"Learn to give more than you receive in life and you*ll be 
happy. I envy you the opportunity to be a part of the 
challenges the future holds for you." 

Principal speaker at the exercises was Vice President 
of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson, who was intro- 
duced by University President Wilson H. Elkins as "A 
man who looks like a Texan, acts like a Texan, and has 
accomplished what most Texans would like to accom- 
plish." Mrs. Lady Bird Johnson was also present at the 
affair. 

The Vice President urged the graduates to support the 
Nation's space explorations as a field of peace, "before it 
can be made into a new battlefield by tyranny." His ad- 
dress is presented in its entirety on pages eight and nine. 

Following his address. Vice President Johnson was pre- 
sented for the degree honorary doctor of laws by Dr. Don- 
ald W. O'Connell, Dean of the College of Business and 
Public Administration. 

The honorary degree of doctor of science was conferred 
upon Dr. Mordecai J. B. Ezekiel. 1918 graduate oi the 
College of Agriculture who is Chief of the United States 
division. U. S. Agency for International Development. 
U.S. State Department. Presenting Dr. F/ekiel's qualifi- 



J uly- An gust, 1963 



3 



cations for the degree was Dr. Gordon Cairns, Dean of 
the College of Agriculture. 

Dr. Arthur A. Houghton, business executive, received 
an honorary doctor of humane letters degree. He was 
presented for the degree by Dr. Albin O. Kuhn, Executive 
Vice President of the University. Dr. Houghton, a native 
of Corning, New York, is President of Steuben Glass, 
Director of Corning Glass Works, Director and member 
of executive committee of U.S. Steel Corporation and the 
New York Life Insurance Company; trustee of the U.S. 
Trust Company of New York and of the Metropolitan 
Museum of Art; Vice Chairman of Lincoln Center for 
Performing Arts, Inc.; and Chairman of the New York 
Philharmonic. 

The honorary degree of doctor of humane letters was 
also conferred upon Dr. Huntington Cairns, Secretary- 
Treasurer and General Counsel of the National Gallery of 
Art, who holds an LL.B. degree from Maryland, an LL.D. 
degree from New York University and the L.H.D. from 
Tulane University. Dr. Cairns has held many positions 
with the U.S. Treasury Department, State commissions, 
museums, foundations and learned societies. He is author 
of Law and the Social Sciences, The Theory of Legal 
Science, The Limits of Art, and Invitation to Learning 
with Allen Tate and Mark Doren. He has been associated 
with the National Gallery of Art since 1943. Dr. Cairns 
was presented for his degree by Dr. Charles Manning, 
Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Honorary Certificates of Merit in Agriculture were pre- 
sented to Mrs. Ester King Crouse, Caroline County; 
Frederick C. Ernst, Sr., Washington County; Ryland Lee 
Mitchell, Jr., Harford County; and William Desmond 
Walker, Sr., Prince Georges County. 

Two musical selections, Gloria by Mozart and Battle 
Hymn of the Republic arranged by Waring, were pre- 
sented by the University Choir, Men's Glee Club and 
Women's Chorus, conducted by Fague K. Springmann. 

Degrees were conferred upon the graduates by Dr. 
Elkins, after which the deans of the various colleges 
handed out individual diplomas. Protocol was sidestepped 
slightly when Dr. Elkins personally awarded a bachelor 
of science degree in education to his daughter, Carole. 

Among those who joined the ranks of Maryland alumni 
were a dozen graduates wearing the citron hoods that 
identify holders of the Masters of Social Work degree. 

These were the first graduates of the University's newest 
professional school which began instruction in September, 
1961 with 20 full-time students. An enrollment of ap- 
proximately 50 is in prospect for 1963-64, when the 
School will add a curriculum in community social work 
to its instruction in social casework. 

Officers of the United States Air Force and United 
States Marine Corps R.O.T.C. program received their 
commissions from Colonel Theodore R. Aylesworth, Pro- 
fessor of Air Science at the University. 

The benediction was administered by the Reverend Mr. 
Theodore R. Casper, Lutheran Chaplain at the University. 

Organist for the Commencement ceremony was Charl- 
ton G. Meyer and pianist was Dr. Mary DeVermond, 
both Assistant Professors of Music at the University. 
Program coordinators were Professor George F. Batka and 
Dr. Paul R. Poffenberger. 

Honored guests at Commencement included the new 
Mayor of Baltimore, Theodore R. McKeldin; and Louis 
Goldstein, State Comptroller. 

Pre-Commencement activities on the College Park and 
Baltimore campuses included the traditional Baccalaureate 



V& 









'*• 



m ■■■ m 






r *•*.'- 




dr. elkins addresses the 1963 Commencement audience. 



Services Sunday, June 2, in the Memorial Chapel at Col- 
lege Park. 

Principal speaker was Rabbi Benjamin M. Kahn whose 
subject was "The Educated Man and the Challenge of 
Our Time." Rabbi Kahn has served as national director 
of the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations since 1959, gradu- 
ated Magna Cum Laude from Harvard College in 1934, 
and was recently appointed by President Kennedy to 
membership on the Peace Corps Advisory Council. 

Also participating in the Baccalaureate program were 
Father William C. Tepe, Roman Catholic Chaplain at the 
University, and the Reverend Merrill A. Stevens, Episco- 
pal Chaplain. Music was provided by the Chapel Choir. 

Graduates and alumni of the College of Dental Surgery 
were honored June 7 at an Academic and Awards Pro- 
gram held in the Health Sciences Library Auditorium in 
Baltimore. 

Dean Myron S. Aisenberg presented the following stu- 
dent awards: University Gold Medal for Scholarship, 
Summa Cum Laude, Richard Paul Beimler, Yonkers, New 
York; Certificates of Merit, Magna Cum Laude, to Joseph 
Michael Wiesenbaugh, Jr., Springfield, Pennsylvania; 
Henry John Van Hassel, Ridgewood, New Jersey; Richard 
Anthony Gallagher, Baltimore; and Frank M. Benneyan, 
Fresno, California. The Alumni Association Medal was 
presented to Richard Paul Beimler, Yonkers, New York; 



the Maryland Magazine 




The Harry E. Latcham Memorial Medal to Ronald A. 
Carter, Fresno, California; The Harry E. Kelsey Memorial 
Award to Paul Von Bose Ladd, Miami, Florida; The 
Harry B. Schwartz Award to William Bernard Finagin, 
Baltimore; The Edgar J. Jacques Memorial Award to 
Renato Patrick DeSantis, Baltimore; The Herbert Fried- 
berg Memorial Key to Henry John Van Hassel, Ridge- 
wood, New Jersey; The Timothy O. Heatwole Chair to 
Richard Paul Beimler, Yonkers, New York; The Kath- 
erine Toomey Plaque to Paul Von Bose Ladd, Miami. 
Florida; The Sigma Epsilon Delta Memorial Medal to 
Henry John Van Hassel, Ridgewood, New Jersey; The 
Alpha Omega Scholarship Award to Richard Paul Beim- 
ler, Yonkers, New York; The Alexander H. Paterson 
Memorial Medal to William Herbert Griswold, Matawan, 
New Jersey. 

The Alumni Association of the School of Dentistry hon- 
ored two members — Dr. Myron Aisenberg, the retiring 
Dean of the School of Dentistry, and the Chairman of the 
Department of Dental Prosthesis, Dr. Grayson W. Gaver, 
who was chosen Distinguished Alumnus for 1963, at the 
Association's Annual Banquet, June 7, at the Sheraton- 
Belvedere Hotel. 

Both men were members of the class of 1922 and both 
have served on the School's faculty since their graduation. 

The graduating class of 1963 were also honored guests 



;it the banquet, as new members ol the Association 

Dr. Aisenberg has been Dean ol the Dental School since 
l l )>4. He has scr\cd as President ol the Maryland State 

Dental Association, the National chaptei ol Alpha 

Omega, the American Academy ol Oral Pathology, and 

the American Hoard ol Oral Pathology, lie served on the 

executive committee ol the Maryland Division ol the 

American Cancer Society. He is also a member ol the 
American College of Dentists, the American Dental Asso- 
ciation, and an honorary member ol the American Acad 
em) of Dental Medicine, the Middle Atlantic State Sen 
o( Oral Surgeons, and the Maryland Section ol the Society 
of Dentistry for Children. 

Dr. Gaver has served under three (.leans at the Dental 
School, Dr. Timothy (). Heatwole. Dr. J. Ben Robinson, 
and Dr. Aisenberg. and has been instrumental in educating 
more than 3.000 dentists. He is a member ol manv scien- 
tific societies, including the American College of Dentists 
the American Denture Society, the American Equilibration 
Society, the Baltimore City Dental Society, and the Ameri- 
can Dental Association. 

The Alumni Association of the School of Law held its 
annual banquet on May 4 at the Sheraton-Belvedere Hotel 
in Baltimore as a testimonial to the late Honorable Morris 
A. Soper, in whose name an annual lectureship is to be 
established. 

The principal address was delivered by Dean William P. 
Cunningham, who reported his plans for the future of the 
Law School. The outgoing president of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation, the Honorable W. Albert Menchine, was toast- 
master. 

Invited guests of honor included the Governor and At- 
torney General of Maryland, the Mayor of Baltimore, the 
United States Senators from Maryland, judges of the Court 
of Appeals and Federal Courts, and University President 
Wilson H. Elkins. 

The graduating class of 1963 was present to be wel- 
comed as prospective members of the Association and of 
the bar. Dean Cunningham presented honors and awards. 

Dr. Ellen Winston, U.S. Commissioner of Welfare, was 
the speaker at the special convocation honoring the first 
graduating class of the School of Social Work, May 29. 
in the Auditorium of the Health Sciences Library. Dr. 
Winston's topic was "Social Welfare Looks to the Future." 

Twelve candidates received their Master of Social Work 
degrees at Commencement Exercises in College Park. 

The senior class of the School of Pharmacy held its 
Pre-Commencement Prom, June 4, in the Wynnewood 
Dining Room, Cold Spring Lane. 

At the annual graduation banquet of the School's 
Alumni Association, June 6, in the Baltimore Union, Dr. 
Frank J. Slama, Professor and Head of the Department of 
Pharmacognosy at the School of Pharmacy, received the 
1963 Honored Alumnus Award. 

Dr. Slama is a native Baltimorean and a graduate of the 
Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. He holds five degrees 
from the University of Maryland — a Ph.G., Ph.C, B.S. 
in Pharmacy, M.S. and a Ph.D., which he was awarded 
in 1935. 

He has been a member of the faculty of the School of 
Pharmacy since 1926. For ten years while he was a grad- 
uate student and part-time instructor — from 1925 to 
1935 — he worked as a registered pharmacist. On sab- 
batical leave in 1 950-5 1 , Dr. Slama served as a Fellow at 
Ohio State University. He is a charter member of the 
American Society of Pharmacognosists, the Rho Chi Hon- 
orary Society, and Phi Delta Chi fraternity. He is also a 



J uly- August, 1963 



member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, the 
American Pharmaceutical Association, the Baltimore 
Metropolitan Pharmaceutical Association, and the Balti- 
more Veteran Druggists Association. He has served as the 
executive secretary of the School of Pharmacy Alumni 
Association for many years. 

Preceding the graduation banquet, the School of Phar- 
macy held its Tenth Annual Honors Convocation, at 
which Dean Noel E. Foss presented the following prizes 
and awards to outstanding graduates: Gold Medal for 
General Excellence to Marjorie S. Abramovitz, Baltimore; 
Certificates of Honor to Jeanne A. Baker, Towson; Yale 
H. Caplan, James J. Welsh, Baltimore; The William 
Simon Memorial Prize to Marjorie S. Abramovitz; The 
Andrew G. DuMez Medal to Yale H. Caplan; the L. S. 
Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize to David A. Blake, 
Baltimore; The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize to 
Chester L. Price, La Vale; The Wagner Pharmaceutical 
Jurisprudence Prize to David A. Blake; The David Fink 
Memorial Prize to Jeanne A. Baker; The Phi Alpha Chap- 
ter, Rho Pi Phi Fraternity Cup to Yale H. Caplan; The 
Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Prize to Stephen P. 
Levin, Baltimore; The Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda 
Kappa Sigma Sorority Prize to Thomas H. Keller, Jr., 
Baltimore; The Merck Award to an outstanding student 
in pharmacy to Marjorie S. Abramovitz; The Merck 
Award to an outstanding student in pharmaceutical chem- 
istry, to Stephen P. Levin; The Bristol Laboratories, Inc. 



Award for extra-curricular activities to David A. Blake; 
The Rexall Drug Company Award for outstanding 
achievement to Jeanne A. Baker. 

The senior class of the School of Medicine began its 
activities with a dinner-dance June 4 at Blue Crest North 
in Pikesville. 

Alumni Day was celebrated at the School of Medicine 
on June 6, beginning with a scientific session, moderated 
by Dr. John M. Scott. Papers were also presented by 
Dr. Aaron Feder, Clinical Associate Professor of Medi- 
cine at Cornell University College of Medicine; Dr. Stan- 
ley Bradley, Head of the Department of Medicine at 
Columbia University; Dr. John A. Wagner, Head of the 
Division of Neuropathology at the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine; and Dr. John J. Bunting, Associate 
Professor of Clinical Medicine at Baylor University Col- 
lege of Medicine. 

The annual Alumni Award and Gold Key was pre- 
sented this year to Dr. Louis A. M. Krause, a 1917 gradu- 
uate. Dr. Krause is Professor of Clinical Medicine at the 
School of Medicine and Chief of the Medical Service at 
Lutheran Hospital. 

Dr. Lewis Klair Woodward, Jr., Medical Director of the 
U. S. Department of State, gave the principal address, 
"The Health of Americans in Overseas Diplomatic Posts," 
at the annual banquet-dance that evening at the Lord 
Baltimore Hotel. 

Certificates of life membership were awarded to the 



Pre-Commencement exercises of the School of Medicine. 




following 50-year graduates of the School of Medicine: 
University of Maryland, 1913 — Drs. Samuel Allen Alex- 
ander, Philip Bean, Franklin Clyde Craven, Charles Reid 
Edwards, Vertie Edward Edwards, W. Frank Gemmill, 
Harry Goldsmith, Leonard Hays, Frederick L. McDaniel. 
William Tillman Martin, Norbert C. Nitch. Walter 
Anthony Ostendorf, Jesus Maria Buch, Harry Cornelius 
Raysor, William H. Scruggs, William Walter Serak, Ham- 
ilton J. Slusher, W. H^ Toulson and Cleveland D. 
Whelchel; Baltimore Medical College, 1913— Drs. Charles 
F. Bove, Dawson L. Farber, Enrique Lassisse y Rivera. 
Ernest G. Marr, Victor C. Nah, George Piness, Roger K. 
Sell and George L. Zimmerman; College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, 1913 — Drs. Rafael Bernabe, Ray Maxwell Bob- 
bin, Ralph Elijah Cloward, James Sylvester Dixon, James 
Corbin Doughty, James Fender Easton, Samuel E. En- 
field, Charles William Finnerty, Paul N. Fleming. Ernest 
F. Flora, Benjamin F. Gallant, E. F. Harbert, Ira J. 
Heller, Fernando H. Janer, William T. May, Charles L. 
Mowrer, Leo P. Musser, William Edgar Myles, Charles 
Francis Nicol, Walter W. Point, Solomon Reina, Raymond 
Harrison Ryder, Armado Sanchez, Elias C. Segarra, Alex- 
ander Senekewitz and Fort Steilacoom. 

Dr. Theodore E. Woodward was chairman of the 
Alumni Day program. 

Dr. James A. Shannon, Director of the National Insti- 
tutes of Health, Bethesda, was principal speaker at Dean's 
Day Pre-Commencement exercises of the Medical School 
on June 7, in the courtyard of University Hospital. 

His Pre-Commencement topic was "The Challenge to 
the Physician — A Contemporary Perspective." 

The academic procession on Dean's Day began at 2 
p.m., after which a convocation prayer was led by the 
Reverend Donald C. Kerr, Pastor of Roland Park Presby- 
terian Church. Dr. Albin O. Kuhn, Executive Vice-Presi- 
dent, extended greetings to the graduating class and the 
nurses' choral group, under the direction of Mr. Charles 
A. Haslup, presented several selections. 

Prizes and honors were awarded to outstanding stu- 
dents by Dean William S. Stone. Winners were: Faculty 
Gold Medal, Summa Cum Laude, David Robert Hess, 
Shady Grove, Pennsylvania; Certificates of Honor, Magna 
Cum Laude, Janet Elaine Mules, Baltimore, Miles Eugene 
St. John, Baltimore; Certificates of Honor, Cum Laude, 
David Allen Braver, Baltimore, Nijole Victoria Brazaus- 
kas, Baltimore, Neal Joseph Prendergast, Baltimore, Leon- 
ard George Rivosecchi, New York City; Balder Scholar- 
ship Award for highest degree of academic achievement, 
David Robert Hess, Shady Grove, Pennsylvania; Award 
for Excellence in Internal Medicine in honor of Dr. Theo- 
dore E. Woodward, Nijole Victoria Brazauskas, Balti- 
more; Dr. Wayne W. Babcock Award for excellence in 
surgery, Philip Asbury Insley, Jr., Salisbury; Dr. Leonard 
M. Hummel Memorial Award for outstanding qualifica- 
tions in internal medicine, Joel Spencer Gordon, Balti- 
more; Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Memorial Prize for best 
work in genito-urinary surgery, Arthur Mattus Smith. 
Westchester, New York; Dr. Harry M. Robinson, Sr. Prize 
for best work in dermatology, Peter Cornelius Fuchs, New 
York City; William D. Wolfe Prize for excellence in medi- 
cine, Miles Eugene St. John, Baltimore; Medical Book 
Award for outstanding scholastic attainment, Clifford 
Lewis Culp, Jr., Baltimore, Stuart Allen Perkal, Baltimore. 

In addition to these awards. Dr. Stone presented to 
43 wives of graduating students, certificates attesting to the 
assistance they had given their husbands in obtaining 
medical degrees. 



Wives of medical students, who acted as ushers at the 
ceremony, were also hostesses at a reception and tea foi 
graduates, parents, friends and faculty, at the Baltimore 
Union. 

June week activities of the School of Nursing began 
June I with a Senior convocation at 3 p.m. in the Health 
Sciences Library Auditorium. 

Dean Florence M. Gipe greeted the graduating students 
and principal speaker was Dr. ( Ronald Kooiis. Instruc- 
tor of Medicine and Radiology at Johns Hopkins School 
of Medicine, formerly Chief Medical Resident at the 
School of Medicine. 

Charles Haslup. Director of the Student Glee Club, 
composed a new musical arrangement for the Florence 
Nightingale pledge, which the group sang and dedicated 
to Dean Gipe. 

Special awards were presented to nine graduating nurses 
by Miss Virginia C. Conley, Chairman of the Baccalau- 
reate Nursing Program. Recipients were: 

The Nurses' Alumnae Association Award for highest 
average in scholarship. Aria Ellison. Baltimore; The Eliza- 
beth Collins Lee Award, for second highest average in 
scholarship, Karin Larsen, Frederick; The Mrs. John L. 
Whitehurst Award, for executive ability, Aria Ellison. 
Baltimore; The Flora Hoffman Tarun Memorial Award. 
for leadership, loyalty, and school spirit, Ann Davidson. 
Baltimore; The Mrs. Charles A. Reifschneider Award, for 
the best professional appearance and conduct toward pa- 
tients and hospital personnel, Barbara La Garde, Fred- 
erick; Neurosurgical Nursing Prize, for the most interest, 
enthusiasm, and proficiency in neurosurgical nursing. 
Carol Haina, Hyattsville; The Elizabeth Aitkcnhead 
Award for the most interest, enthusiasm, and proficiency 
in the nursing care of surgical patients, Jane Morris, 
Owings Mills; the Elizabeth Aitkenhead Award for the 
most interest, enthusiasm, and proficiency in operating 
room nursing, Jo Ella Bevjan, Baltimore; Woman's Aux- 
iliary Board Award, for outstanding performance in pro- 
fessional nursing care, Carolyn C. Becker, Baltimore; and 
The Nurses' Alumnae Association Award for leadership 
in the professional student nursing organization. Lois 
Hoffman, Baltimore. 

The seniors attended the Baccalaureate services in the 
Chapel at College Park on Sunday, June 2, and on June 
3, were guests at an all-day picnic. The traditional ban- 
quet and cap-stringing ceremonies were held in the Perm 
Hotel in Towson on June 5. 

The graduates were guests of the School's Nurses Alum- 
nae Association at their annual banquet and dance June 7. 
at Blue Crest North, Pikesville. 

Nearly 135 University of Maryland graduating seniors 
and an audience of more than 1 ,000 jammed Heidelberg 
University's Neue Aula to capacity June 2 to take part 
in the tenth annual Commencement ceremony of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland European Division. 

The largest graduating class in the 14-year history of 
the program — 175 — received bachelor's degrees from 
President Wilson H. Elkins. Some 40 members wen 
awarded their diplomas in absentia. 

Featured as speaker was the French author and his- 
torian, Andre Maurois, who also received an honorary 
doctor of letters degree. Mr. Maurois, a member of the 
revered Academie Francaise, is best known for his biog- 
raphies of French literary figures and for his histories of 
France, the United States and Germany. His books have 
often been used in Maryland's overseas courses in French 
civilization. 



July-August, J 963 



" 



Among civilian and military dignitaries who attended 
the ceremony were the Honorable J. Millard Tawes, 
Governor of Maryland; General Paul H. Freeman, Jr., 
Commander of the U.S. Army in Europe; and Dr. Fritz 
Ernst, rector of Heidelberg University. Dr. Ray Ehrens- 
berger, Dean of University College, presided over the 
ceremonies, assisted by Dr. Mason G. Daly, Director of 
the European division. 

Social activities for Commencement weekend in Heidel- 
berg included a get together for full-time faculty members 
the day after Commencement, and a reception in honor 
of the graduates following the ceremony. 

President Wilson H. Elkins personally presented 103 
diplomas to Maryland students who completed require- 
ments for the bachelor's degree in the Far East Division 
at Commencement exercises in Tokyo, Japan on March 
24. 

Dr. Elkins was assisted by University College Dean Ray 



Ehrensberger and Dr. Leslie R. Bundgaard, Director of 
the Far East Division. 

There were 97 men and six women in the class. 

Highlight of the Commencement, held in Kudan Kaikan 
Auditorium, was an address by General James F. Collins, 
Commander-in-Chief of the U.S. Army in the Pacific, 
who pictured education as a potent weapon for the Na- 
tion's fighting men who must win men's minds as well as 
battles in the fight against Communism. He praised the 
1963 class as having the determination and knowledge 
necessary to contribute to the Nation's further develop- 
ment. 

Dr. Elkins conferred the honorary Doctorate of Mili- 
tary Science upon General Collins. 

The day following graduation, 38 education advisors 
and officers in the Division attended a special luncheon, 
at which Dr. Elkins spoke briefly, and that evening a 
faculty dinner was held in the Sanno Hotel. 



An Address by the Vice-President of the United 
the One Hundred and Fifty-First Annual 



SO LONG AS THERE HAVE BEEN COMMENCEMENT 
exercises, it has been traditional to assure each 
graduating class that they were about to enter a dis- 
turbed, plagued and gravely threatened world. This 
year many speakers seem to have found a new horizon 
of hopelessness. 

If Communism doesn't bury us, if Socialism doesn't 
engulf us, if our debt and taxes don't topple on us, 
if morality doesn't collapse beneath us, the Class of '63 
is told to rest secure because, in due time, we are sure 
to be overtaken and destroyed by the advance of 
science. 

I do not accept this verdict on the future of man — or 
the consequences of mankind's present dramatic prog- 
ress in science and all the fields of human knowledge. 
If I may, I would like to talk with you about this today 
— and especially about the future relationship of govern- 
ment and science. 

In the early 1950's, the University of Maryland 
ranked among the first ten of the nation in football. 
For reasons we won't go into here, that is somewhat 
changed. However, today the State of Maryland ranks 
among the first ten in science, in scientific activity and 
in scientific talent. 

Maryland is making a major and impressive contribu- 
tion to our national efforts in science. 

But some are asking the question — what contribution 
are those national efforts making for all the people of 
all the states? 

Is our space effort too dominant? Is it usurping too 
much of our scientific talent and ability? Is the concen- 
tration of space science depriving us of opportunities 
to learn what remains to be learned on and about 
earth? Is the space effort leading us to neglect other 
work we ought to be doing on earth? 

If we as a nation had no competition, if we had no 
stakes of national prestige, if we had no considerations 
of national security, if there were no Communist Russia 
or no Communist China, if we had nothing but our self 
respect and our tradition of free scientific inquiry, our 



effort in space today should differ very little from its 
present magnitude or its present priorities. 

What we are and what we aspire to be as a nation 
rests upon the predicate of maintaining peace on earth. 
If peace is to be maintained on earth, free men must 
acquire the competence to preserve space as a field of 
peace before it can be made into a new battlefield by 
tyranny. Were there no other considerations, this alone 
would require us to do what we are doing in space — 
and would permit us to do no less. 

We are not reaching for prestige in space — we are 
reaching for peace. And this is considerably more 
urgent than many realize or others will yet admit. 

In large measure, this perspective helps to answer 
other questions now being raised. 

Space is clearly the great breakthrough of human 
knowledge — for centuries to come. We do not know — 
and the Soviets do not know — what the stars will tell 
us. We do know that to default the exploration of the 
universe of space would surely be as catastrophic in its 
consequences as if we had defaulted exploration of the 
universe of the atom. Our superiority in any scientific 
field will be brief and fading if we do not win and hold 
competence in this new and decisive realm of discovery. 

In exploring space, we are exploring the environment 
of the earth itself. We are finding paths through a new 
dimension — and historically civilizations have stood or 
fallen according to their ability to move through a 
dimension. 

We seek to make space an instrument for peace and 
the development of mankind. But if we abandon the 
field, space can be preempted by others as an instru- 
ment for aggression. 

And in a world of competing social systems, we 
would be naive indeed if we failed to recognize how 
bleak the future would be if this new dimension be- 
came the realm of tyranny. For your children, and 
your children's children, an iron curtain would be 
drawn across the pathway to the stars. 

What concerns me today is the nature of the fashion- 



8 



the Maryland Magazine 




States, Lyndon B. Johnson, on the occasion of 
ommencement of the University 






able outcry against science itself — and the source from 
which much of the most vocal criticism comes. In our 
enlightened intellectual community, many are parroting 
George Bernard Shaw's often quoted phrase, 'Science is 
always wrong — it never solves a problem without creat- 
ing ten more.' 

Science is not creating our problems — it is creating 
answers to our problems. A rare moment of oppor- 
tunity is upon us. But many to whom we should turn 
for affirmation, confidence and enthusiasm are offering 
doubt, disenchantment and despair. 

A free society can longer outlive the failures of its 
scientists than the lack of faith of its philosophers. We 
of America cannot lead the world, we cannot keep up 
with the world, we cannot even follow closely behind 
the world if we permit our sophistication and abun- 
dance to degenerate into cynicism and arrogance. 

As Shakespeare put it 'Our doubts are traitors' — be- 
cause they make us lose the good we might win 'by 
fearing to attempt.' 

As the best fed, best clothed, best housed, best edu- 
cated, people in all history, Americans today must not 
fear to attempt. 

Space is a boon — not a boondoggle. We are talking 
superstition — not sense — when we talk of machines 
overpowering men. We are selling ourselves short when 
we show the white feather to nuclear fission. 

As David Lilienthal said some years ago, 'A world of 
science and great machines is still a world of men — 
our modern task is more difficult but the opportunity 
for democratic methods can be even greater than in the 
days of the ax and the handloom.' 

Our challenge today is not to turn back from the 
horizons of physical science but to turn toward the new 
and greater horizons of political science. 

The struggle of this Century is a struggle between 
two political systems — free and slave. If science is 
pressed into the service of those who would enslave 
mankind, science must also be marshalled to support 
those who would keep men free. 



If that goal is to be served, we must not permit the 
pace of physical science to outrun the performance of 
our political science. 

Our public policy as well as our popular philosophy 
must embrace the greater opportunities being opened 
to us by science and put these new capabilities to 
greater use. This is our real challenge today. 

We have a long and undistinguished record in 
America of failing to anticipate the promise and po- 
tential of each new age of science, invention and dis- 
covery. Early in our history, there was an effort to 
close down the Patent Office on the theory that every- 
thing worth inventing had already been invented. Even 
so farsighted an American as Woodrow Wilson spent 
time denouncing the automobile. The steamboat, the 
locomotive, the airplane all brought prophecies of doom 
and gloom. We have learned a lesson we surely do not 
need to be taught again. 

You of the Class of '63 do not graduate into hope- 
less times. On the contrary, unlike the Class of '53, or 
'43, or '33, you graduated into one of the most hopeful 
times in the history of man. 

Our world today is moved and motivated as it has 
never been before by the enthusiasm, optimism and 
confidence of peoples everywhere. There is war — there 
is poverty — there is ignorance. But for the first time, 
nations of Africa and Asia along with nations of Europe 
and the Americas are working together for world peace, 
for economic growth, for better education. 

We are climbing toward the summit of man's experi- 
ence — and science is the lifeline that ties us all together. 
We cannot accept — we do not accept — the sudden cyni- 
cism of those who tell us this rope which lifts us up is 
in reality a noose about our necks. 

As has been said, 'The feeling of distrust is always 
the last which a great mind acquires.' 

The feeling of distrust of the future should be the 
last which a great nation such as ours acquires. 



July-August, 1963 




David Brigham Resigns 
as Director of Alumni Relations 



AFTER 16 YEARS OF SERVICE, DAVID L. BRIGHAM HAS 
resigned his position as Director of Alumni Affairs 
to accept an executive appointment with a leading Mary- 
land banking institution. 

Since 1947, Mr. Brigham has served as Director of 
Alumni Relations for the University and, at the same time, 
as the Executive Secretary of the University of Maryland 
Alumni Association. On July 5 of this year, members of 
the Board of the First National Bank, Baltimore, elected 
Mr. Brigham an Assistant Vice President. 

Known as "Dave" to hundreds of alumni and friends 
of the University, Mr. Brigham has for many years been 
a leading figure in a number of public service organiza- 
tions. He was elected a State Commander of the Ameri- 
can Legion, 1955-56, and has served on that organiza- 
tion's National Executive Committee for eight years. He 
is the Moderator of the award-winning television program 
"To Promote Goodwill," which explores the beliefs of 
the three major faiths in America. 

He received the Bachelor of Arts degree (College of 
Arts and Sciences) from the University in 1938. During 
World War Two he served as a combat infantryman and 
press relations officer with the 40th Infantry Division in 
the Pacific Theater of Operations, 1943-45. 

Among his several awards are "The Man of the Year 
Citation" presented by the Mayor of Baltimore; "Citation 
for Distinguished Citizenship" presented by the Governor 
of Maryland; and awards for his television program pre- 
sented by the State of Iowa, Interfaith Committee, Ameri- 



can Legion Jewish War Veterans, B'nai Brith, American 
Legion Auxiliary, and the National Council of Christians 
and Jews. 

In a letter commenting on Mr. Brigham's resignation, 
President Elkins wrote, in part: 

"On behalf of the entire University I wish to thank you 
for the many contributions which you have made during 
the 16 years you have served in an official capacity. I 
wish you an abundance of success and happiness in your 
future undertakings." 

At the June 29 meeting of the Alumni Council a com- 
mendation was presented by that organization to Mr. 
Brigham and it reads in its entirety: 

"As Executive Secretary of the University of Maryland 
Alumni Association since January, 1947, and of the 
Alumni Council since its activation in March, 1948, he 
has exerted untiring and unselfish efforts in furthering the 
interests and welfare of the University of Maryland and 
its Alumni affairs. In recognition of his distinguished 
leadership, service and accomplishments, the Alumni 
Council extends its highest commendation and confers 
upon him a lifetime sustaining membership in the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Alumni Association and a lifetime 
ex-officio membership on the Alumni Council. As he 
departs from his position, the best wishes and deepest 
appreciation of the Council and all Alumni of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland are expressed to him for a job excep- 
tionally well done. May God's blessings continue upon 
him for success in the years ahead." 



10 



the Maryland Magazine 



Thk General Ai.umni Coun< 11 

s ( HOOL ./\ D C0L1 EG1 
A7 PRESE \ / I TIVES: 

All R 1 C V 1. I V R E 

Myio Downey. '27 
Abram Z. Gottwals, '38 
William Max Buckel, '51 

ARTS A X 1> SCIEN C E S 

Frank B. Wise. '35 
Jess Krajovic, '32 
Richard Bourne. '57 
Frank Claggett, '52 

BUSINESS A X li PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas E. Bourne. Jr.. '43 
Chester W. Tawney. '3 I 
Jacob B. Sclar. '34 

l> i: N I A I. 

Dr. Charles F. Broadrup, '32 
Dr. Edward B. Stone. Jr.. '25 
Dr. George B. Clendenin. '29 

l: 1) U CAT I X 

Edward S. Beach. Jr.. '49 
Miss Dorothy Ordwein, '35 
Mrs. Virginia Coleman. '35 

E x <; I X E E R I X G 

Tracy Coleman, '35 
James A. Stapp, Jr., '47 
S. D. Wolf, '42 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Mary Ward Davis. '55 

Miss Margaret Loar. '41 

Mrs. Marilyn Archer Stutts. '53 

Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 
Hon. Joseph L. Carter, '25 
Thomas N. Berry, '40 

M E I) I C AL 

Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 
Dr. Gibson J. Wells, '36 
Dr. George H. Yeager. '29 

Mrs. E. Elizabeth Roth Hipp. '29 
Miss Doris Stevens. '51 
Mrs. Hortense Tegler, '48 

PHARMACY 

Hyman Davidov, '20 
Samuel A. Goldstein, '30 
Dr. Frank J. Slama. '24 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS 

University President 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

Executive Secretary 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Assistant Secretary 
Victor Holm, '57 

Past Presidents 

Dr. Arthur I. Bell. '19 

C. V. Koons, '29 

Talbot T. Speer, '17 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12 

Col. O. H. Saunders, '10 

J. Homer Remsberg, '19 

J. Gilbert Prendergast ,'33 

Joseph H. Deckman. '31 

Frank Block, '24 

Harry A. Boswell. Jr., '42 

Mrs. Elizabeth Rohr Singleton. '47, '51 

Dr. Reginald V. Truitt. '14 

Mr. Harry E. Hasslinger '33 

OFFICERS 

President, Dr. Edward D. Stone, '25 

Vice-President, Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '34 

Vice-President, Hon. Joseph L. Carter, '25 

Executive Secretary, David L. Brigham, '38 

Assistant Secretary, Victor Holm, '57 

ALUMNI CLUBS 

Baltimore — Arthur G. VanReuth. '34 

"M" Club— George W. Knepley, '39 

Montgomery County — 

Dr. Donald Boyd, '43 
Pittsburgh— A. B. "Budd" Fisher, '26 
Prince Georges County — 

Dr. John W. Cronin, '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix. '36 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, '19 
U. S. Department of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans. '26 
Washington County — 

Charles B. Huyett. '53 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



THERE IS NOTHING IN I II 1 MORI BASK lll\N \ "<.<>< H)in I ". II MATTERS 
little how it is said, or in what language. The word is soon lost m the 
feeling which lies behind it. The farewell may be given to a departing friend, 
to a loved one who has been called to final rest, or to a fellow creature who 
has labored in the vineyard. Man differs from all other forms of life because 
he has the ability to remember and to treasure his memories. 

For many years, mine has been an unusual privilege. I have met you, 
visited you, worked with you, and written to you. No man has had a life 
more filled with the true blessings which the journey of life provides. Often 
we have spoken and written of the Heritage Tradition which is ours. We have 
talked of the bends in the road, of changing times, of the challenge of youth, 
and of unexplored horizons which only educated minds can reveal and con- 
quer. 

It is easy to say there must be no tears, there must be no regrets, there- 
must be no nostalgia. It is fine to see new fields to conquer, to search out 
new challenges, to strive unrelentingly forward. These are proper thoughts, 
and basic in all humans who would achieve, who would make their mark, 
and who know that progress comes through men who are not afraid of the 
unknown. The forward look deserves great praise. This is why we have a 
University of Maryland. We are proud to have been a part of a past which 
gives us a stake in the future. 

Basic to every man, is his heritage, the stock from whence he came, and 
the loyalties others established for him. To the complete man, his Creator, 
his Country and his Fellowmen are important. Deeply entwined in every 
thought, action and deed, are those who watch and care. Man attempts to 
accomplish for himself, but to a much greater degree for those who are always 
a part of his ever-expanding circle. This is why we have so welcomed news of 
the accomplishments of our fellow-alumni. 

It might be easy to say a door has been closed, a curtain rung down, or 
the play is over and a farewell is in order. Such thoughts are quickly obliter- 
ated by a great light which filters through all barriers. Memory makes certain 
that what has been a vital part of life is not lost as a chapter comes to an end. 

More than sixteen years is a long time. There are records; but records are 
filed, and quite often forgotten. What then makes one so sure that a curtain 
once drawn will not destroy the past. The answer lies in those who will 
follow, just as we have followed many who established guidelines for us. 

There is assurance . . . The University will go on; it will grow and 
prosper. It will serve new lives, and produce great alumni. The Alumni As- 
sociation will develop, expand and render far greater service. The many who 
have demonstrated accomplishment, loyalty, dedication, support and friend- 
ship will not be lost in the going and coming. 

Life is not nearly long enough to give one man the opportunity to bring all 
his memories into focus, and to say his thanks for the thoughts, the encour- 
agement, the understanding and the confidence which have been his to 
cherish. 

I can now see clearly through the tapestry. The light, which was at first 
so blinding, radiates from the faces of my friends. You will remember me. 
and I will remember you. Memory is basic to man. 

Sincerely, 




>&«A — 



Da\ id L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



July- August, 1963 



11 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



AUGUST 

5-10 4-H Club Week 

16 Summer Session Ends 

SEPTEMBER 

3-6 Firemen's Short Course 
16-20 Fall Semester Registration 
21 Football, North Carolina State 
(Band Day), Home 



23 Instruction Begins 

28 Football. South Carolina, Away 

OCTOBER 

5 Football, Duke, Away 
12 Football, North Carolina, 

Home 
19 Football, Air Force Academy, 

(Parents Day), Home 



26 Football, Wake Forest, Away 

NOVEMBER 

2 Football, Penn State 

(Homecoming), Home 
9 Football. Navy, Away 
16 Football, Clemson, Away 
23 Football, Virginia, Home 
28 Thanksgiving Recess Begins 
After Last Class 



Retiring members of the faculty, and their wives, who were 
honored at a Tea recently at the Rossborough Inn on the College 
Park Campus included, left to right, George F. Corcoran, Pro- 
fessor, College of Engineering; Mrs. Corcoran; Harlan Randall, 
Professor, Department of Music; Mrs. Randall; Eric H. Small. 
Associate Professor, College of Engineering; Mrs. Small; Charles 
T. Stewart, College of Education; Mrs. Stewart; Mrs. Joseph C. 
Fehr; and Col. Joseph C. Fehr. University College. Retiring 



members not pictured: Dr. Myron S. Aisenberg. Dean of the 
School of Dentistry; Bridgewater M. Arnold, Professor, School 
of Law; Marie Denecke, College of Education; John W. Magruder. 
Professor, College of Agriculture; Dr. Raymond Morgan, Pro- 
fessor, College of Arts and Sciences; and Mark M. Shoemaker. 
Associate Professor, College of Agriculture. The event was spon- 
sored jointly by the Faculty Club and The American Association 
of University Professors. 





major general Joseph d. caldara, right. A & S '3 1 , recently became the first U. S. Air 
Force General to receive the Gold Medal of Madrid. The only other American so 
honored was former Ambassador to Spain, John Davis Lodge. Madrid's mayor, the Count 
of Mayalde, left, presented the medal to Major General Caldara "for his humanitarian 
efforts on behalf of the Spanish people." Caldara. outgoing Chief of the Joint U. S. 
Military Group, will begin a new assignment as Assistant for Mutual Security, Head- 
quarters, U. S. Air Force in the Pentagon. He has been active in several charities during 
his three year tour of duty in Spain. The presentation of the medal was attended by 
the U. S. Ambassador to Spain, the Military Attaches representing the three armed 
services, other Embassy officials, and members of the City Council. 



Pre-college Plan Aids Freshman Studies 



Freshmen who will enter the Univer- 
sity in September will have a better 
chance to succeed as a result of an in- 
novation which has been added to the 
two-day pre-college program. 

Freshmen, for the first time, are be- 
ing registered and scheduled for classes 
during the pre-college program while 
upperclassmen will not register until 
registration week, September 16-20. 
They are meeting their academic ad- 
visors, planning courses for the first 
semester, and receiving an identification 
card. The University is arranging their 
schedule of classes to achieve a fair 
balance, study time, and leisure time. 

The first pre-college program was 
started in the summer of 1958 by the 
Office of Student Life. Students are 
brought in groups of 25 representing a 
particular college (engineering, nursing, 
liberal arts, education), and in a two- 
day period acquaint themselves with the 
campus and a few of their future class- 
mates. 

Students have a busy schedule. The 
first day includes testing and interpreta- 
tion of the American College Testing 
exam required of all freshmen. Advisors 
consult with the student, discuss his 
strong and weak points revealed by the 
test and recommend the best course of 
study. 

Also on the first day, students will 



be required to take notes at a lecture 
presented by a University professor. 
After the lecture the professor will illus- 
trate the proper way to take organized 
notes in a college lecture. Other activi- 
ties include a tour of McKeldin Library 
and a performance by the University 
Summer Theater. 

The second day of the program is 
devoted to academic advising, testing 
and registration. Sponsors serve as 
guides to the group and explain every- 
thing from University history to extra- 
curricular activities in which freshmen 
can participate. Sponsors are carefully 
selected outstanding junior and senior 
students. 

"Fifty-five per cent of the freshmen 
students participated last year and we 
expect an equivalent percentage this 
year," said Dean B. J. Borreson, Execu- 
tive Dean of Student Life. "Academi- 
cally," he said, "the freshman that par- 
ticipates does better by up to point 
seven of his average depending on his 
college." 

Students attending the program are 
housed in Dorchester and Queen Anne's 
Hall. The Student Union is open for 
meals and recreational activities — such 
as swimming and bowling. Books may 
be purchased early at the Student Sup- 
ply store. 



School of Social Work 
Receives Accreditation 

l he University ol Maryland's youngest 
professional school on the Baltimore 
campus, the School ot Social Work. 
has been granted accreditation bj the 
Council on Social Work Education, 
the accrediting body for graduate 
schools oi social work throughout the 
United Siaics and ( anada I be ac 
creditation was made retroactive to the 
beginning ot the program. 

In announcing the .icciciIh.iii.mi 
President I Ikms said thai the new 
school, which began instruction in Sep- 
tember 1961, tills a long-felt need lot 

professional social work education in 

Maryland. 

"We are gratified." President I Ikms 
said, "that the school was accredited at 
the earliest possible date and that the 
Council's report commented so favor- 
ably on the high standards of our 
School. This means that all credits 
earned by our first graduates are given 
sanction by the Council." 

Twelve candidates were awarded the 
Master of Social Work degree at the 
University's Commencement Exercises 
on June X, having completed the two- 
year program of graduate studies. 

The Council's on-campus study of the 
University of Maryland program was 
conducted by Dr. Mark Hale, Dean of 
the University of Illinois School of So- 
cial Work, and Margaret Schubert, Pro- 
fessor of Social Work at the University 
of California School of Social Welfare. 
The accrediting activities of the Council 
supplement those of the Middle States 
Association, of which the University of 
Maryland is a member. 

University Joins 
Low-cost Loan Program 

Low cost loans from home town banks 
will be available to University of Mary- 
land students who need help in financ- 
ing the cost of their education under a 
plan that has been put into operation. 

Under the plan a student, after com- 
pletion of the freshman year, may bor- 
row from the bank of his choice up to 
$3,000. Repayment is by 36 monthly 
installments beginning four months 
after the student leaves school. 

Mechanism for this "College Reserve 
Program" has been established by the 
United Student Aid Funds. Inc., a non- 
profit corporation set up to assist col- 
leges and universities in providing low- 
cost bank loans to deserving students, in 
cooperation with the Board of Regents. 
Approximately 2 q () colleges and univer- 
sities in 42 states are now participating 
in the CRP. 

Additional information on this pro- 
gram is available from H. Palmer Hop- 
kins. Director of Student Aid. at Col- 
lege Park. 



July-August, 1963 



13 







14 



the Maryland Magazine 



Dr. Paul Borisuk, young American dentist, 
demonstrates American dental equipment to 
enthusiastic Russian stomatologists. 



Medicine, U.S.A. 

The American Exhibit in 
the U. S. S. R. 



IN 1958 THE GOVERNMENTS OF THE UNITED STATES 
of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Repub- 
lics agreed upon an exchange program of cultural and 
scientific material. The overall objective of these ex- 
changes has been the creation of understanding. In Rus- 
sian this is termed ponimaniye. In either language the 
problem is a highly complex one. The political, economic, 
and social differences between our two countries would 
seem to defy the possibility of developing any substantial 
degree of understanding but the stark alternative certainly 
justifies the Presidential admonition to "keep talking". In 
the mid-Twentieth Century, when mankind possesses the 
power of massive annihilation and the ability to explore 
the atmosphere of Venus, the rate of change is so rapid as 
to preclude reliance upon the status quo as a form of 
security. 

There is a great amount of literature which has accumu- 
lated on the subject of Russia. The natural tendency of 
any author is to generalize from his observations, but this 
is a dangerous practice since the process is subject to at 
least four very serious limitations which may be grouped 
as 1) personal limitations, 2) time-imposed restrictions, 
3) Soviet-imposed restrictions, and 4) provision of a 
standard for comparison. 

The first important personal restriction is the subtle, yet 
pervasive, one of bias — a factor which operates so impor- 
tantly during the process of interpretation. A second is 
education. What the observer sees and reports must be 
fitted into the perspective not only of Russian history but 
of world history, and must have a basis in political devel- 
opment and social economics, not only in terms of the 
U.S.S.R., but in terms of many societies. A third impor- 
tant personal limitation is that of language, that common 
means of communication, about which no further com- 
ment need be made. 

The important time-imposed restriction has to do with 



the matter of becoming an authority on Soviet society in 
any short period of time. The author is not even an 
authority on American society. Properly, this is a matter 
for professionals whose education fits them for their role 
as authorities. It is surprising how many short-term ex- 
perts grind out articles and books. It is hoped that the 
reader will keep this in mind as he peruses this article. 

The fourth and most difficult problem is that in any 
evaluation system one has to use a standard for compari- 
son. This is how, after all, one evaluates most things. 
With what does one compare what he sees in the U.S.S.R.? 
Should it be with what one is used to in the U.S.A.? Even 
the Soviets don't do that, except to feature in their propa- 
ganda system the things which they can find in our society 
which detract from it, such as the existence of organized 
crime, the problems of our underprivileged citizens, the un- 
employment rate, problems of racial desegregation, organ- 
ized prostitution, the struggle over social security coverage 
for the elderly citizen and others. These things taken out 
of context produce a grim image, very much like the single 
rotten apple in the barrel. Or, does one compare the 
U.S.S.R. with pre-revolutionary Russia? To do this one 
must now go back half a century, and, in any case, must 
face up to the fact that the deficiencies of that society led 
to the Bolshevik revolution. Use of this comparison leads 
into one of the basic fallacies of Marxism-Leninism. 
Should one speculate on what Russia might have become 
under a free enterprise capitalistic system as we know it 
today, using West Germany or post-war Japan as a model? 
This is obviously an imponderable, and perhaps an un- 
realistic approach. There is a fourth standard possible, 
and this is the practical one used by the Soviet citizen 
himself. It involves an evaluation of change in the evolv- 
ing social and economic structure of the post-revolutionary 
and post-Second World War U.S.S.R. As one can hear 
again and again in the Soviet Union, great improvements 



by PATRICK B. STOREY, M. D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
University of Maryland School of Medicine and Medical Director of the Exhibit. 



July- August, 1963 



15 




Dr. Storey and Edward R. Murrow, Director of USIA. 



have taken place in many aspects of Soviet society. This 
is a very real experience to the Russian citizen who, no 
matter how young he is, in some way has been involved 
in the devastation of the Second World War. This year's 
pair of shoes is better than last year's, food is more avail- 
able, and new apartment houses are going up over thou- 
sands of acres of suburbs of the great cities. The average 
American thinks in terms of his own house, and American 
suburbia consists predominantly of private homes, but the 
average Russian thinks just as enthusiastically of his own 
private apartment. Such was Yuri Gagarin's prize for be- 
ing the first man to circle the earth. The Soviet citizen 
sees these every-day changes for the better and he is en- 
couraged. His conviction that his country is making great 
strides forward from the povetry-stricken past is rein- 
forced by the news of Soviet space exploits in which his 
country, at least seemingly, has outstripped the United 
States. That this is the standard used is strikingly illus- 
trated by one remarkable characteristic. In our discussions 
with Russian visitors to the Exhibit, and particularly in 
our relations with Russian news reporters, it became ap- 
parent that they were very much oriented to the future. 
They were not nearly so much interested in discussing 
things as they are as they were in projecting into the 
future. A very tangible evidence of this tendency to orient 
on the future is the great emphasis placed on the education 
of the young. Some of the group had the opportunity to 
visit and be shown through one of the new Internat 
Schools by its principal. This is one of the developing 
systems of boarding schools in the Soviet system in which 
the children live at school through the entire week return- 
ing home only for weekends. When we visited the second 
grade of this school, the children, who were already learn- 
ing English, sang an English song for us. Inappropriately 
for springtime in the Ukraine, the song was "Jingle Bells", 
but none the less, it was unrehearsed and very much ap- 
preciated by some homesick Americans. 

Under terms of the particular agreement signed in De- 
cember 1959, three exhibits were exchanged between the 
two countries. Shown by the U.S.S.R. in the United States 
were exhibits which dealt respectively with children's 



books, children's technical arts and crafts, and medicine. 
The three American exhibits sent to Russia were in the 
fields of plastics, transportation, and medicine. 

The American exhibits were developed by the United 
States Information Agency. The Medical Exhibit was 
shown for three weeks each in Moscow, Kiev, and Lenin- 
grad. 

MEDICINE U.S.A. WAS A 7,000-SQUARE FOOT Ex- 
hibit comprised of 21 self-contained units. More 
than 100 business and industrial firms, private 
institutions, government agencies, and individuals from 19 
states and the District of Columbia contributed items 
totaling $150,000 to it. It included an up-to-date library 
of current books in the field of health and many thousands 
of the specialty journals of the American Medical Associa- 
tion which were given to the Soviet medical visitors. 

The exhibit was designed to show the Soviet people 
various aspects of American medicine and medical care. 
Some of the displays were of a general interest type, and 
others were designed to be of particular interest to Soviet 
medical workers. There was a fully-equipped operating 
room, a typical practicing physician's office, a dentist's 
office, and a completely appointed semi-private hospital 
room. There was also a fully-stocked replica of a typical 
American drug store. Of more specific scientific interest 
were displays on industrial and urban hygiene; on the use 
of radioisotopes in medicine; a cardiac bypass machine 
with a number of internal and external cardiac stimulators, 
together with some of the more modern cardiac pros- 
theses; an artificial kidney; a unit for perfusion of isolated 
tumors; an excellent display of prostheses and orthopedic 
devices; equipment used in the newborn room; blood bank 
equipment; and an automatic electronic monitoring system 
to be used in the operating room, recovery room or inten- 
sive care unit. 

The demonstration staff for the exhibit consisted of 
22 Russian-speaking Americans, half of whom were drawn 
from professional medical fields. The exhibit was under 
the competent administrative direction of full-time mem- 
bers of the United States Information Agency. 

The reaction to the exhibit by the Russian people was 
most gratifying. The attendance in Moscow averaged 
about 1,500 people a day; in Kiev about 7,000 a day; and 
in Leningrad about 5,000 a day. In the latter two cities, 
people waited in line for three and one-half hours to four 
hours to be admitted to the exhibit. The vast majority of 
visitors were friendly and curious, and very much inter- 
ested not only in what was shown at the exhibit, but also 
in talking about America. As was true of the two previ- 
ous exhibits, they had many questions to ask about the 
American way of life. Their written comments as they left 
the exhibit were almost universally friendly and apprecia- 
tive. 

There were two sources of adverse reaction to the ex- 
hibit. The first was a consistent criticism by the Soviet 
press which tried to point out to the Soviet people that 
the exhibit did not present a true picture of medical care 
in the United States, where such care, they said, was 
available only to the rich and not to the American worker. 
This type of press comment was consistent with the usual 
Soviet presentation about the problems of the American 
people. The second type of adverse reaction which was 
encountered came from Soviet medical workers who would 
have preferred a much more technical type of exhibit of 
the kind that is presented by scientific societies here in 
the United States. This wish on the part of Soviet medical 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 



scientists for a more detailed presentation of American 
medical science was quite understandable and testified to 
the great regard in which American medicine is held by 
the Soviet physician. 

During our stay in the U.S.S.R. the professional mem- 
bers of the staff had the opportunity to visit many Russian 
clinics, hospitals, and medical institutions. With few ex- 
ceptions, our reception by the Soviet doctors was cordial 
and warm. We had the opportunity to visit many wards 
and laboratories and to talk to many Russian physicians 
and surgeons about the problems common to doctors any- 
where. This gave us the opportunity to see how medical 
care is administered in the Soviet Union. There were some 
things which we saw which were impressive, and many 
other things that were most unimpressive. 

The Russian medical system differs from ours in that 
it is administered as a Central Government function on 
a cost-free basis to the individual citizen through the 
Ministry of Health. The right to the protection of his 
health and to free medical care in case of illness is a 
constitutional guarantee to the Soviet citizen. 

The closest American analogy to the system of admin- 
istration of medical care in the Soviet Union is the medical 
care program of the Armed Forces. The distribution of 
care in the Soviet Union is organized on a regional and 
district basis with general hospitals, polyclinics and local 
dispensaries operating within a given region supplemented 
by a rapid medical aid system which is mobile and re- 
sponds to the call of a citizen who needs medical attention 
on the street or at home. In addition to this system, there 
are more specialized hospitals which may service great 



areas depending upon the kind oi work thai they perform. 

If a citizen needs police help he dials 01. in ease ol 
fire 02. and if he needs medical help he dials 03 I he 
public pay telephones are equipped with a button which 
activates the call without the necessity tor the- deposit <<l 
the usual 2 kopec coin. The citizen is authorized t<> use 
this button when he is calling for public service I he rapid 
medical care limousine, which is stalled with a physician 
is dispatched in response to this call lor help. I he patient 
is treated at home, in the limousine, or taken to the ho- 
pital depending upon his needs. During his illness ami his 
absence from work, his salary is not forfeited. It. when 
he returns to work, there is a physical limitation on wh.it 
he can do. a prescription to this effect is written In In 
doctor which must be honored by the plant manager. An 
interesting aspect of an applied public health principle was 
described to us at the Tuberculosis Institute in Leningrad. 
When a patient is found to have tuberculosis the living 
conditions of his family are investigated. If it is found that 
these are substandard, as they frequently are because ol 
the shortage of living quarters, the family is moved into 
new quarters with the idea in mind of preventing that next 
case of tuberculosis from appearing. 

Through lack of sufficient experience. I am unable to 
comment on the actual adequacies of this system in pro- 
viding care. Nominally the Russian doctor works a 36- 
hour week. Comments from the visitors to the exhibit 
led me to think that in addition to the official State-ad- 
ministered system there is a certain amount of private 
practice of medicine and that if one wants reasonably fast 
service one has to pay for it. I have no idea of the extent 



Miss Anita Magnus demonstrating items from the well-stocked drug store which was provided by Drug Fair of Washington. D.C. 
Fluent in Russian, English, Dutch, German and French, this young American really enjoyed her work as a guide with the Exhibit. 
as harassing as it often became. The tremendous assortment of consumer items available in the U.S. is in marked contrast Id their 
scarcity in Soviet Russia. 






Russian medical visitors to the Exhibit were keenly inquisitive about items of equipment. 
They were very much impressed with American workmanship, and probably not too credulous 
about its wide availability in the U.S. 



While a critical article was being published 
prominent surgeon, his staff was visiting the 
ment as we could give away, including sue! 



of this "off hours" practice system. 

The hospitals we visited appeared to be adequate and 
to be well-staffed. They are similar to American municipal 
hospitals, but not comparable to American Federal hos- 
pitals. The medical wards of the Botkins Hospital in 
Moscow were over-crowded at the time of our visit with 
six patients to a room and some patients in the hallways. 
This may, however, have been a function of the time of 
year since we visited there in early March. Our own hos- 
pitals have trouble coping with the demands put upon 
them at this time of the year. The extensive building pro- 
grams in Moscow, Kiev and Leningrad include the provi- 
sion of new hospital and clinical structures, some of which 
were partially completed. 



THE RUSSIAN MEDICAL EDUCATION SYSTEM ALSO DIF- 
fers considerably from ours. It is administered 
under the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of 
Higher Education. There are some 70 schools of general 
medicine in the Soviet Union, 27 schools of pediatrics, 
23 schools of hygiene, 17 schools of stomatology (den- 
tistry) and ten schools of pharmacy. 

For all of the medical institutes of the U.S.S.R. there 
is a single curriculum developed by the Central Ministry. 
Medical education is free to students; the state provides 
funds for the operation of the institute. The students re- 
ceive a stipend of 30 rubles a month during their years 
of study. A student is eligible for entrance into one of 
these schools upon completion of ten years of secondary 
school. He must take a competitive examination. There 
are three or four applicants for each vacancy, so the com- 
petition is stiff. Fifty-five per cent of the students are 
now men which indicates a shift in the proportion between 
the sexes. Women still comprise approximately 75 percent 
of the practicing doctors. 

The course in the medical school lasts six years and is 
oriented on a basis somewhat similar to that in our schools 
with the first two years devoted to the didactic basic 
sciences, the next two to the clinical sciences and the last 
two towards a practical experience on the wards and per- 
haps outside the schools in the dispensaries of the city 
or of a factory. The graduating student must take five 
state examinations: 1 ) Marxist Philosophy, 2) Internal 



Diseases, 3) Surgery, 4) Obstetrics and Gynecology, and 
5) Hygiene. 

The placement of new doctors is compulsory. They are 
offered a choice of several areas of the country where 
there is a demand for doctors. Having indicated their 
choice they receive an assignment for the next three years. 

Beyond the point of graduation from medical school 
there are three systems of higher medical education, which 
may be described roughly as follows: Continuing Medi- 
cal Education. This is on an organized basis. There are 
1 1 institutes for the professional advancement of doctors. 
Some 16,000 doctors a year improve their qualifications 
in these institutes by means of short specialized courses 
of from four to six months. A doctor has a chance to 
do this every two or three years. He is given a scholarship 
for this peroid, his continued salary is guaranteed, and 
dormitory space is provided him. There is a "Clinical 
Internship" system throughout the large hospitals and 
medical institutes of the U.S.S.R. This compares with 
our house-officer training system. Approximately 2,500 to 
3,000 young doctors per year enter this program for 2 to 3 
years of specialized training. Upon graduation from this 
program these doctors work as specialists in large urban 
or suburban hospitals, or in regional hospitals. The third 
program may be referred to as the postgraduate program. 
This is the main source of recruitment for professors and 
instructors in medicine. The Postgraduate schools accept 
young graduates who have had no less than 3 years of 
practical experience and have demonstrated interest in 
scientific research. This postgraduate program enrolls 
about 700 to 800 doctors per year. Upon graduation 
from this 3-year course, the postgraduate student presents 
a thesis to attain the learned degree of Candidate of Medi- 
cal Sciences. 

In addition to the training of physicians, the Soviet 
medical education system provides for the training of a 
"middle" medical worker, for which there is no analogue 
in the American system. These are the feldschers, whose 
course of training lasts for three years beyond the eligi- 
bility point of the ten year secondary schools. Depending 
upon their specialization, feldschers are concerned with 
the handling of many of the minor problems of medicine, 
obstetrics, and surgery. It is interesting to note that should 
they at some time decide to go on to attain the status of 



18 



the Maryland Magazine 





the Soviet press over the name of a 
srating Room and getting as much equip- 
imonplace items as atraumatic needles. 



Dr. Maxwell Lear, general surgeon in private practice in New Haven, demonstrating the 
surgical equipment of the operating room. Genial dean of our group, he took care <>1 all 
of us as sickness took its toll away from home. 



a doctor they must take the entire 6 year course in the 
medical institute, but they do have a priority on entrance 
into such an institute. 

Medical research in the Soviet Union is also centrally 
organized and directed. There is a heavy emphasis on 
applied research in medicine, a phenomenon which is 
apparently characteristic of other fields of Soviet science. 

Education, research and administration are the status 
carrying subdivisions within the profession. The doctors 
who have proceeded along these lines are much more 
highly paid than the average. There appeared to be a 
great preponderance of men among the higher echelons. 
It was my impression that many of the women doctors 
had their duties as wives and mothers to look after, a 
function which could be reasonably well adapted to the 
36-hour work week of the Russian doctor. 

We invariably found that the Russian physician and 
surgeon was a great admirer of the American medical 
sciences. Most of them were able to read English although 
few could speak it. The Index Medicus, detailed abstracts 
of the world medical literature translated into Russian, 
American medical journals, and American textbooks, 
however old, were in all the hospital libraries which we 
visited. In order to conserve money a limited number of 
American journals are purchased or exchanged, are then 
excellently reproduced by a photo-printing process, and 
these reproduced copies are widely distributed through- 
out the Soviet Union. The JAMA is called the SHAMA 
by Russian doctors. 

It is difficult to comment on the overall effectiveness of 
this system or on the quality of the profession in terms of 
research, education and medical service. While we were 
in the Soviet Union we had occasion to read and see re- 
ports published by Soviet visitors returning from the 
U.S.A. Invariably these reports conformed to the pattern 
of being condemnatory even to the extreme of pointing out 
that many American women have their babies on the 
streets because they cannot afford to pay $600 or $800 
for a place in a maternity hospital. In effect, these reports 
produce a false impression of conditions in the U.S.A. 
This is deliberate on the part of the Soviets. As an Ameri- 
can, I am under no constraint to indulge in this kind of 
emphasis by describing the consumer item shortages and 
the inefficiencies of the Soviet system. To judge from the 



comments of visitors to our exhibit and from what we saw 
on our various visits, medicine and medical care in the 
Soviet Union suffer from some severe deficiencies by our 
standards. Medical service is, after all, a consumer item. 
The Soviet system has not provided its citizens adequately 
in terms of the things that go towards making life a little 
more livable, and this includes medical care. The equip- 
ment in our exhibit was looked upon with avid eyes by 
the most prominent men in Russian medicine and surgery, 
as were all of the items displayed in the drugstore section 
of the exhibit by the average citizen. Their technical 
equipment necessary to the effective practice of modern 
medicine was often makeshift or imported in small quan- 
tities for specialized institutes. Our heart-lung machine 
was actively sought after in all three cities as were many 
of the items displayed in the operating room. In the 
Soviet Union dental gold costs $8.00 a gram contrasted 
to $.90 a gram in the U.S.A. The use of dental porcelain 
is almost non-existent and stainless steel is very widely 
used for dental prostheses. Consequently, the Soviet citi- 
zen smiles at you with either a golden or a stainless steel 
smile depending upon his ability to purchase gold. They 
do not have the high speed turbin dental drills that are 
characteristic of every dentist's office in the United States. 
We were proudly shown four of these, which were im- 
ported units, in the main Polyclinic for Stomatology in 
Leningrad. On the other hand, they have also made great 
accomplishments under adverse circumstances, not the 
least of which is the provision of a more favorable physi- 
cian-population ratio than we have now in the United 
States. 

There can be no doubt that many of their physicians 
and surgeons have achieved excellence. It was indeed a 
privilege to meet some of these men. One of their great 
problems, in my opinion, is that they have suffered by 
isolation from their Western colleagues. Their only com- 
munication has been through the printed word. The rapid 
development of knowledge and the true realization of its 
significance depends upon the free exchange of ideas and 
the opportunity to see them in action. They have not 
had this opportunity until very recently and such exchange 
is still very meager. It is increasing, however, a trend 
which should certainly be encouraged to the mutual ad- 
vantage of both sides. /«<? 



July- August, J 963 



19 



InSide Maryland SpOrtS by BillDismer, Director of Sports Information 



WITH OPENING GAME ONLY A LITTLE MORE THAN A 
month away and interest in the five-game home 
schedule heightened by the biennial appearance of Penn 
State at College Park on November 2, Maryland football 
fans will be scanning the sports pages with renewed in- 
terest as the Labor Day weekend gets under way. 

Labor Day will be just that for the nearly 60 players 
Head Coach Tom Nugent will have greeted three days 
previously, for what will be a holiday to most of us will 
be the first day of practice for the 1963 Terrapin grid 
team. 

Nineteen letter-men are expected to be among the 
squad which will check in the evening of Friday, August 
30, to get settled before facing the news photographers 
the following day, "Press Day." The real work will start 
two days later, and if you've never seen a Nugent-directed 
practice session, it's worth the trip out to watch. Some 
observers have likened it to a Hollywood set, with the 
director — tutor and whistle-tootin' Tom — at the helm of 
a raised platform, supervising all. 

Third-place finishers in the Atlantic Coast Conference 
the past three years, the 1963 Terps will be hard-pressed 
to maintain that pace in the upcoming race. Those 19 
lettermen sound pretty good until it is realized that defend- 
ing champion Duke will have 20 and runnerup Clemson 
24. Altogether, six of Maryland's opponents will have 
more experienced personnel than our College Parkers — 
only South Carolina, Wake Forest and Virginia have less. 
There's no room for pessimism, though — not with 
senior Dick Shiner who already has stamped himself as 
the greatest passer in Maryland history — back to create 
new records every time he throws the ball. The good- 
looking lad from Lebanon, Pa., who finished third among 
the Nation's passers last year, set no less than ten all-time 
Maryland records during the 1962 campaign and came 
close to equalling two all-time Conference marks of that 
renowned pair of Carolinians, Norman Snead of Wake 
Forest and Roman Gabriel of N. C. State. 

Completing 121 passes in 203 attempts last year for 
a brilliant .596 percentage, Shiner came within two of 
Snead's record 123 completions in 1960. Coupled with 
the 58 he completed as a sophomore, the Terp towhead 
will enter his senior year with a two-year total of 179. 
That's 106 behind Gabriel's career mark, but Dick needs 
less than he completed last year to match the ex-Wolfpack 
great. 

Maryland-wise, here are the passing records Shiner al- 
ready owns or shares: (old marks in parentheses) 



Single game: 



17 (ties Mont's 
•0 (ties Scarbath's 



Season: 



Most passes completed 

1946 mark) 
Most total plays 

1950 mark) 
Most yards gained — 272 (Scarbath 243, 

1951) 
Most passes attempted — 203 (132, Betty, 

1960) 
Most passes completed — 121 (82, Betty, 

1960) 
Most yards gained passing — 1,324 

(1,049, Scarbath, 1952) 
Most total yards gained — 1,426 (1,286, 

Scarbath, 1952) 



Career: Most passes attempted — 314 (269, Scarbath) 
Most passes completed — 179 (131, Scarbath) 
Most yards gained passing — 2,245 
(2,187. Scarbath) 

Little wonder, then, that Shiner is being constantly 
mentioned as a genuine all-America threat and that his 
quarterbacking is the chief reason Terp fans are expecting 
Coach Nugent to field his fourth winning team in a row. 
Maryland won't have to depend entirely on Shiner's 
passing for offensive purposes; not with the return of Len 
Chiaverini who, as a sophomore, led the ACC in rushing 
last year (602 yards — 3.9 average) and the senior Ernie 
Arizzi, who was the Terps' third leading yard-eater. Also 
due to be heard from in this position (swingback) are 
the sophomore, Tony Cerra, and the junior, Ronnie 
Adams. Cerra has a lot of potential needing only experi- 
ence; Adams is called a great prospect by the coaches. 
It's obvious why this position is rated the team's strongest. 
Other backs you'll be hearing about are the senior Bob 
Burton, an excellent all-around player who's filled every 
position except signal-caller in the backfield; Steve Glaser, 
an area product who should come into his own as a senior 
after being plagued by injuries his first two years; Jerry 
Fishman, 220-pound tailback who was the outstanding 
player of the spring game and who gained over 600 yards 
as a freshman two years ago and Darryl Hill, Maryland's 
first negro athlete. The last-named had a fine spring; is 
quick, agile and an extremely dangerous safety man. Terp 
coaches call him their jack-rabbit back, who sometimes 
looks like Bobby Mitchell in action. 

However, games are won and lost in the line and it's 
there that Nugent's '63 squad is most suspect. You can't 
lose men like Roger Shoals, Walter Rock and Dave 
Crossan without feeling it and although their replacements 
are promising, for the most part they're inexperienced. 
The split-end position still is in a variable state, much as 
it has been the past two years. Frankly, there's not too 
much height there with Andy Martin, the likeliest to open 
the season, standing a bare six feet. Letterman Dave 
Nardo, a wild-card defensive end last year, is the best 
blocker on the team but he may be shifted to another 
spot. The senior Ed Rog could play a lot. 

The guard spots are much like the tackles: fairly big, 
physically, but lacking experience. Joe Ferrante, the only 
senior, is a good two-way guard and undoubtedly will start 
while Fred Joyce, a junior, came along fast last year. 
Three sophomores — Larry Bagranoff (215) and the 
Melcher twins, Dick and Mick, are fine prospects. 

It's the center position that causes Maryland's coaches 
to smile. There, they have all three lettermen centers back 
from last year: Co-captain Gene Feher, who should be 
all-Conference; Ed Gilmore, another senior, and Ron 
Lewis, a junior. Lewis, an excellent line-backer, acted 
as defensive quarterback last year. 

Although the Penn State game tops the home slate, 
there'll be four other top games at Byrd Stadium this 
season with N. C. State furnishing the first opposition on 
September 21. North Carolina invades October 12, the 
Air Force October 19 with Virginia again winding things 
up on November 23. Don't forget that the Duke game at 
Richmond on October 5 — the Tobacco Bowl game — also 
is Maryland's home game. 



20 



the Maryland Magazine 



Through 

The 

Years 



IT IS OUR HOPE THAT THIS COLUMN 
is proving of interest to you. It's 
success is dependent, in a large meas- 
ure, upon your willingness to give us 
information for use in the column. 
We want to know about you, your 
activities, your accomplishments, and 
items of personal interest concerning 
your family and friends and your 
school-mates and your fellow-alumni. 
If you have an item of interest which 
you would like included in the col- 
umn, please take a moment to jot it 
down and send it in to us: Alumni 
Office, Administration Building, 
University of Maryland at Col- 
lege Park. 



1895-1919 

Dr. Arthur J. Kiser, d.d.s. '94, of 
Colorado Springs, Colorado, died on 
December 14, 1962. 

Roland Lee Harrison, Sr.. Agr. 
'95, died on April 19, 1963, after being 
struck by a car while visiting in Sara- 
sota, Florida. Mr. Harrison was one of 
our oldest and most loyal alumni. He 
returned to campus whenever possible 
for Homecoming and reunions. Until 
his death, he lived in Arlington, Vir- 
ginia. He was 87. 

Morris A. Soper, ll.b. '95, died at 
his home in Baltimore on March 11, 
1963. Judge Soper had a long and dis- 
tinguished career with the United States 
Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals. He 
was 90. 

Dr. Jesse C. Coggins, m.d. '96, died 
in Laurel, Maryland, on January 21, 
1963. Dr. Coggins was the owner and 
director of the Laurel Sanitarium, 
which he opened in 1905. He was 88. 

Otto Schoenrich, ll.b. '97, is asso- 
ciated with the international law firm 
of Curtis, Mallet-Provost, Colt and 
Mosle of New York. Mr. Schoenrich 
served in many legal and consulting 
capacities for a number of Latin Amer- 
ican countries, and has written several 
books concerned with several of these 
countries. 

Judson H. Sencindiver, Pharm. '97, 
died in Silver Spring, Maryland, on 
January 19, 1963. Mr. Sencindiver 
manufactured and sold a line of drugs 
and cosmetics. He was 88. 



Dr. John E. Legge, m.D. '^K died 
on September 20, 1962, at the age oi 
87. Dr. Legge was one ol Maryland's 
senior physicians and an outstanding 
teacher at the University ol Maryland 
School of Medicine. 



1920-1929 

H. Morrison "Hap" Carroll, Agr. 

'20. of Bel Air. retired recently after 
many years in the County Agent field. 

Dr. J. P. Ponte, Jr.. m.d. '20. ol 
New Bedford. Massachusetts, is active 
as a surgeon, a member of the local 
yacht club, and a Fellow in the Ameri- 
can College of Surgeons. 

Dr. Vincent Bonfiglio, m.d. '21. is 
in active practice in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. 

William C. Rogers, ll.b. '21, of 
Baltimore, is President of the Security 
Title Guarantee Corporation of Balti- 
more. He is active in the Knights of 
Columbus, Elks, America Israel Society, 
National Conference of Christians and 
Jews, and is Chairman of both the 
Maryland interracial Commission and 
the Baltimore City Human Relations 
Committee. 

Albert A. Levin, ll.b. '22, is a 
practicing attorney in Baltimore. He has 
served as Assistant Attorney General, 
Police Magistrate, and Enforcement Di- 
rector at the Office of Price Stabiliza- 
tion. 

Dr. Samuel Harry Blank, d.d.s. 
'22, is Superintendent of the Camdent 
Free Dental Clinic of Camden, New 
Jersey, and is active in numerous dental 
societies. 

J. Herbert Snyder, Agr. '22, resides 
in Walkersville, and is Manager of the 
Farm Credit Associations of Frederick. 
He holds active memberships in the 
Lions Club, Grange, Masons, and 
County Farm Bureau. 

Dr. Frederick T. Kyper, m.d. '23, 
is an active physician, and Associate 
Professor in the School of Medicine. 
He is an active member of Rotary, the 
Alumni Club of Baltimore, and is 
Chairman of the E. N. T. Society. 

J. Philip Schaefer. Engr. '23, is 
Manager of the Commercial Service 
and Power Division of the Potomac 
Electric Power Co. His home is in 
Bethesda. and he is a Mason, a Ro- 
tarian, President of the Men's Garden 
Club, and active in the Chevy Chase 
Educational Foundation, and The 
Chamber of Commerce. 

George Hofferbert, ll.b. '23, has 
a private practice, and is a member of 
the Board of Fire Commissioners for 
Baltimore City. He has previously been 
a member of the Board of Municipal & 
Zoning Appeals of that city. Collector 
of Internal Revenue for Maryland and 
D. C, and President of the Commis- 
sioners for Opening Streets in Balti- 
more City. He served as a member of 



the State Senate ol Maryland and as a 
Member ol the House oi Delegates He 

has also been active in the Knights ol 

( olumbus, Alhambra, Moose, I Iks, 
Eagles and man) othei organizations 

DR. I <>l IS A S( HI I I/. Ml) 24. is a 

practicing physician in the Bronx, 

Luther Sentman I imbi «i>. i i b 
'24. is Manager ol the < ontract Bond 
Department ol the Maryland < asualty 
( ompanj in Baltimore. 

I i urn \( i S M w. Agr. '28, ol Salis- 
bury, Maryland, holds both an \l s 
and a Ph.D. in Botanj I oi a numbei 
of /ears she was a member ol the B 
ogy Department al Maryland State 
leathers College at Salisbury. She has 
held memberships in the American \- 

sociation for the Advancement ol 

Science, and the American Association 
of University Women, also a member 
of the Women's Auxiliary Board ol 
Peninsular General Hospital. 

Ralph W. Powers, A&S '28. is a 
resident of Upper Marlboro. Md.. also 
received his LL.B. degree from George 
Washington University in '31. Prior to 
becoming a Circuit Court Judge, he 
practiced law. was a member of the 
State Legislature, and was President of 
a number of organizations including the 
Prince Georges Chamber of Commerce, 
and the Prince Georges Bar Associa- 
tion. He served four years with the 
Army and attained the rank of Lt. Col. 

Joseph W. Strohman, Engr. '28. 
lives in Chevy Chase. Md. and is the 
Director, Estimates Div., Off. of Design 
& Construction Public Bldgs. Service. 
G.S.A. He is a member of Alpha Tau 
Omega Fraternity. 

Goldie H. Talbot (Mrs. Dewey), 
Nurs. '28 of Baltimore. Md.. works on 
private duty. Previously she was Night 
Sup't. of Kernan Hospital for Crippled 
Children in Baltimore. 

J. Savin Garber, m.d. '29 of Ja- 
maica, L.I., N.Y., is a practicing physi- 
cian. He served four years in the Army, 
and attained the rank of Captain. He is 
a member of the A.M. A., and has been 
treasurer of the Parkway Hospital in 
Queens. 

Rev. W. P. Plumley. A&S '29. of 
LeRoy. N. Y., received his B.D. in 
Theology from the Virginia Theological 
Seminary in '32. is presently Clergyman 
Rector. St. Mark's Church, LeRoy. 
N. Y. He has served as Chaplain in 
the Armed Forces both in reserve and 
active duty from 1929-1956, and held 
the rank of Lt. Col. His wife Dorothv 
was a BPA graduate of '33. 



1930-1939 

G. Bowers Mansdorffr, m.d. '30. 
is in private practice in Baltimore. 
Maryland. 

CLARE Geen DUCKETT holds a Cer- 
tificate of Professor from the School ol 
Law. '34. and also attended Loyola, 
Johns Hopkins and Goucher College. 



July-August, 1963 



21 



Is now in private Practice of Law in 
Annapolis. At one time was a full time 
staff member of the Legal Aid Bureau 
in Baltimore. She is the wife of Judge 
O. Bowie Duckett. Mrs. Duckett is a 
member of many civic organizations 
and business organizations, some of 
which are the State & County Bar 
Assn.. Anne Arundel General Hosp. 
Assn.. Anne Arundel County Mental 
Health Assn. and others. She was the 
Chairman of the City of Annapolis 
Cancer Drive in 1958. 

Wesley J. Katz. m.d. '34. of Bates- 
ville. Ark. is a surgeon. He is the Chief 
of S:aff of Grays Hospital, and Surgeon 
ol MOP Railroad. He has been Past 
Pres. of several medical societies. Past 
Grand Master F. & A.M. of Ark.; is 
member of 33rd degree Red Cross of 
Constantine; K. of the York Cross of 
Honor. Scimitar Shrine; Gov. of the 
Advisory Comm. of Education; Chrmn. 
of the Comm. on Public Schools; Pres. 
of the School Board 1954 to the present 
time; Past Pres. of Kiwanis; Founder 
member of S.W. Surgical Congress. He 
also belongs to the AMA among other 
Medical Societies. 

Bernard Grossman, Ph.G. '34, of 
Livingston. N. J. is now Field repre- 
sentative for Ayrst Laboratories. He 
was formerly a store manager for 
Whelan Drug and Liggett Drug. He 
was a Tech. Sgt. during World War II. 

E. Robert Kent, Engr. '34, lives at 
Sherwood Forest, Md. and is President 
of The Poole and Kent Co. He is a 
Lieutenant in the USNR, and holds 
memberships in a number of Engineer- 
ing Societies including the American 
Soc. for Htg., Refr. & Air Conditioning 
Engineers and the Nat'l Soc. of Profes- 
sional Engineers. He is a Mason and a 
Shriner. 

Lester E. Mallonee, ll.b. '34, re- 
sides in Laurel, Md.. having his own 
private Law Practice. He is a member 
of the Order of the Coif, the American 
Bar Assn., Maryland Bar Assn., the 
American Legion Post No. 60 and the 
Forty and Eight, and is Vice Chairman 
of the Prince George's Co. Chapter 
American Red Cross. 

Richard O. White. Agr. '34, of 



Hvattsville. Md., is Assoc. Dir. Pesti- 
cides Regulation Div., U. S. D. A. He 
formerly was an Entomologist with the 
same department. He is a member of 
Alpha Zeta Entomological Soc. of 
America, and the Insecticide Soc. of 
Wash. He holds the rank of Major in 
the Army. 

Edward F. Cotter, m.d. '35, is a 
practicing Physician in Baltimore. He 
also received a Ph.G., B.S. in Pharmacy 
in '31. He formerly was an Assoc. 
Prof, of Medicine at the Univ. of Md. 
School of Medicine, and Chief of Medi- 
cal Dept. at Maryland General Hos- 
pital. He held the rank of Lt. Col. 
during World War II. 

Charles David Wantz, A&S '35, of 
Cincinnati. Ohio, is Assistant Zone 
Mgr. of the Chevrolet Motor Div. of 
General Motors Corporation, and has 
served in a number of positions with 
this same firm since his graduation from 
the University of Maryland. 

Thomas H. Webster, III, Engr. '35, 
lives in Bromall, Pa. and is working as 
an Engineer in that area. 

W. W. Noel, d.d.s., '35, is living in 
Hagerstown, Md. He has a general 
practice in Dentistry. 

Col. Edward F. Quinn, Jr., Edu. 
'35, is living at Fort Meade, serving 
with the Army since 1939. He was for- 
merly a teacher. He also holds his M.S. 
Degree from the University of Iowa 
which he received in 1950. 

Victor Rosenthal, m.d. '36, now 
lives in Merrick, L.I., N.Y. He also 
holds a degree from A&S '32. He is a 
general practitioner. 

J. Rodman Harrison, Agr. '36, of 
University Park, Md. is a Staff Assistant 
with the Washington Gas Light Co. He 
served for two years as a Pfc. with the 
Armed Forces. 

Elbert H. Cohen, ll.b. '36, of Bal- 
timore, is a Division Chief. Sanitary 
Section of the Baltimore City Health 
Department. 

A. B. Beveridge, Engr. '36, of 
Hyattsville, also holds a JD degree in 
Law received in 1941 from the George 
Washington University Law School. He 
is a Partner in law firm of Browne. 
Schuyler & Beveridge, and formerly was 



a Patent Atty. with G.E. Co. and also 
other law firms. He attained the rank 
of Colonel, USAFR. He is a member 
of the Order of Coif, and belongs to 
several fraternities. He is a member of 
the Supreme Court and D. C. Bars, and 
several others. He is also a member of 
The Rotary Club. 

Mrs. W. Gibbs McKenney, H.Ec 
'36, of Baltimore, was formerly a 
teacher in both the Baltimore and 
Washington, D. C. Public Schools. She 
has been a National Officer of Delta 
Delta Delta Sorority, and is a member 
of the Board of Directors of the Balti- 
more Regional Chapter of the Ameri- 
can Red Cross. 

I. Edward Fox, d.d.s. '37, is a resi- 
dent of Atlantic City, N. J. and carries 
on a private practice in Dentistry in 
that city. He was a Captain with the 
Armed Forces during World War II. 

Raymond K. Thompson, m.d. '41, 
of Baltimore, is a Neurosurgeon, and an 
Assistant Prof, of Neurological Surgery 
at the University of Maryland School 
of Medicine. He holds the rank of Lieu- 
tenant, USNR. He is a member of the 
Medical & Neurosurgical Societies, a 
Past President of CNS, and President of 
the Medical Board at University Hos- 
pital in Baltimore. He has had "Pedi- 
atric Neurosurgery" published. 

William S. James, ll.b. '37, is now 
residing at Havre de Grace, Md. He is 
a State Senator of Harford County. 
Maryland. 

Pyke Johnson, Jr., A&S '37, of Old 
Greenwich, Conn., has also received 
his M.A. '39, in the Field of English 
from George Washington University. 
He is at present Editor-in-Chief of 
Anchor Books. Among his former posi- 
tions he was Publicity Mgr. for publish- 
ing firm, teacher of English at Colum- 
bia Univ., Editor of a publishing firm. 
Res. Asst. National Education Assn., 
and Graduate Asst. at the University 
of N. C. He holds rank of Lt. Comm., 
USNR. He has held memberships in 
many publishing and library associa- 
tions. He has had several papers pub- 
lished, and has been a guest lecturer at 
N.Y.U., Univ. of Michigan and other 
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22 



the Maryland Magazine 



Harry E. Hassiinger, Edu. and 
George O. Weber, Engr., both of the 
Class of 1933, were commissioned sec- 
ond lieutenants from the University's 
ROTC Program on June 2, 1933. Both 
retired as Colonels in the U. S. Army 
Reserve on June 3rd of this year. The 
tables were turned — George has been 
the Commanding Officer of the ROTC, 
and Harry was the Commander of the 
Reserve Unit, the 2221st Corps Hqs. 
Both were given citations by the Army, 
and recognition by members of their 
Unit. Harry received a gold watch. 
Weber is the Director of the Physical 
Plant and Supervising Engineer for the 
University, while Hassiinger is the im- 
mediate Past President of the Univer- 
sity's Alumni Association. 

Dave Brigham, A&S '38, Alumni 
Secretary since 1947 has joined the 
First National Bank of Maryland as 
Assistant Vice President. Abe Gottwals 
of this same Class is also an Assistant 
Vice President of The First National 
with offices in Salisbury, Maryland. 

Roland W. Heil, d.d.s. '38, of Bal- 
timore has a general practice in Den- 
tistry. He formerly was an Interne of 
USPHS Marine Hospital, Baltimore, 
was in Military Service with the Dental 
Corps receiving the rank of Major, and 
had his own private practice. 

Aaron Feder, m.d. '38, resides at 
Jackson Hgts., New York, and has a 
private practice in Internal Medicine. 
He previously was Clinical Associate 
Professor of Medicine at Cornell. He 
attained the rank of Major, M.C., 
A. U.S. He is a Fellow of the American 
College of Physicians, the American 
College of Cardiology and the N. Y. 
Academy of Medicine. He is a Diplo- 
mate of the American Board of Internal 
Medicine. He is on the Medical Board 
of Bellevue and Long Island Jewish 
Hospitals, and consultant at the above 
and at Booth Memorial Hospital. He 
is also on the staff of the New York 
Hospital as well as the others listed 
above. He has had published numerous 
papers in Internal Medicine. 

Joseph A. Ellis, ll.b. '38, lives in 
Charlottesville, Virginia. He is Divi- 
sional Claim Superintendent of State 
Farm Mutual Auto Insurance Co. 

Edward H. Myer, Jr., d.d.s. '38, of 
Mahwah, New Jersey, has a general 
practice in Dentistry. He served with 
the U. S. Army and has the rank of 
Captain. He belongs to the Bergen 
County Dental Society, the New Jersey 
State Dental Society, the American 
Dental Association, The American So- 
ciety of Dentistry for Children. He is a 
member of the Mahwah Chamber of 
Commerce, and the Lions Club. 

Aaron Stein, m.d. '38, is living at 
Great Neck, L. I., New York and is a 
physician in private practice. He held 
the rank of Major, M.C., AUS. He is 
Associate Attending Psychiatrist, the 
Mt. Sinai Hospital. New York, New 
York and Attending Psychiatrist. Hill- 



side Hospital, Glen Oaks. New York. 
He has had a number ol papers and a 
chapter in a book published, all on the 
subject of Psychiatry and Group Psy- 
chiatry. 

Paul M. GalBREATH, Agr. '39. is a 
resident of College Park, Maryland, 
and an Associate Extension Soil Con- 
servationist. He also has an M.S. de- 
gree from Maryland in Agr. Economies, 
'40, and from Maryland he also re- 
ceived his LL.B. '54. He received the 
rank of Captain with the USAF. 

Mrs. Doris DeAi.ua Simmons 
Owen, H.Ec. '39. resides at Glen 
Burnie, Maryland. She is a Nutritionist 
of the Anne Arundel Health Depart- 
ment, and was previously Kitchen Su- 
pervisor at Hutzlers, and Dietitian at 
the Baltimore Vocational School. She 
is a member of the Maryland Public 
Health Association, and the Alpha 
Delta Sorority. 

Herbert Prescott Hail, Engr. '39, 
of Silver Spring, Maryland, is Treasurer 
of The Washington Woodworking Co.. 
Inc. Formerly he held poistions of 
Junior Engineer with both the District 
of Columbia Water Department and the 
U. S. Army Corps of Engineers. He 
held the rank of Captain in the Infantry 
of the U. S. Army. He is presently 3rd 
Vice President of the Washington Host 
Lions Club. 

Leonard Wallenstein, m.d. '39. 
who lives in Baltimore, is a physician in 
private practice. He is a member of the 
American Medical Association and the 
American Health Association, the 
American Society of Internal Medicine, 
and a Diplomate of the American 
Board of Internal Medicine. He is an 
Attending Physician at Sinai, Lutheran 
and Franklin Square Hospitals. He is 
an Assistant in Medicine at the Johns 
Hopkins School of Medicine. 



1940-1949 



Frederick E. Murphy, Jr., m.d. '40, 
of Thomasville, Georgia, is an Ortho- 
pedic Surgeon. He holds the rank of 
Major with the Armed Forces. He be- 
longs to Phi Chi and Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon Fraternities. 

Charles R. Parsons, Engr. '40, re- 
sides in Washington, D. C. He holds 
the position of Supervisory Construc- 
tion Engineer at the U. S. Naval Re- 
search Laboratory in Washington. He 
formerly was a draftsman with the 
Pennsylvania Railroad, Chief Engineer 
with Paul P. Stone. Inc. and Sales 
Engineer with Builders Equipment Co. 
& Cushwa Brick & Building. He is in 
the Active Reserve of the U. S. N. and 
holds the rank of L.C.D.R.. Civil Engi- 
neering Corps. He is a member of 
F.A.A.M.. the American Legion, and 
several engineering societies including 
Society of American Military Engineers 




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and the National Society of Profes- 
sional Engineers. 

Eugene L. Pessagno, Jr., d.d.s. '40, 
of Baltimore, has a general practice in 
Dentistry, and has the rank of Major, 
D.C., AUS. He has been Dental In- 
terne and Member, House Office Asso- 
ciation of Maryland General Hospital. 
Has privileges at Bon Secours and St. 
Joseph's Hospitals. He is in general 
practice, and has been an Instructor of 
Operative Dentistry at the University of 
Maryland Dental School. He is a Fel- 
low, American College of Dentists, and 
belongs to a number of professional so- 
cieties as well as non-professional or- 
ganizations. He is a Past President of 
the University of Maryland Alumni As- 
sociation. 

Ralph J. Tyser, BPA "40 and M.A. 
'50, lives in Washington, D. C. He is 
Vice President, The Glove Distributing 
Co. He served in the Armed Forces, 
reaching the rank of Major. He belongs 
to the Touchdown and the Terrapins 
Clubs. 

Alvin J. Fainberg, Pharm. '41, re- 
sides in Washington, D. C. He is a 
Pharmacist. He belongs to a number 
of professional organizations, including 
the American Pharmaceutical and the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association. 

Lawrence L. Wilson, Engr. '41, of 
Gladwyne, Pennsylvania, is a Manufac- 
turer's Agent. He formerly was a Stu- 
dent Engineer of Westinghouse Corpo- 
ration. He belongs to the American 
Hardware Manufacturers' Association 
and the Hardware Merchants and 
Manufacturers' Association of Philadel- 
phia. He also belongs to the Keystoners 
Club and the Rotary Club. 

Stanley N. Yaffe, A&S '41 and 
m.d. '44 resides in Baltimore and spe- 
cializes in Dermatology. He is a con- 
sultant for the Veterans Administration 
and the USPHS of Baltimore. He held 
the rank of Lieutenant in the Navy. He 
was a member of the Baltimore Derma- 
tology Society. 

Edward L. Frey, Jr., m.d. '41, is a 
resident of Baltimore and a practicing 
physician. He was a Captain in the 
Medical Corps. Bon Secours and St. 
Agnes hospitals have him on their 
staffs. 

Maurice M. Rath, ph.d. '42, whose 
major was Pharmacology, lives in Short 
Hills, New Jersey. He received his A.B. 
and M.D. from Indiana University, and 
his M.S. from New York University. 
He has a private practice. He was 
Senior Assistant Surgeon in U. S. Pub- 
lic Health Service during World War II. 
He belongs to the American Medical 
Association, the American Association 
for Advancement of Science and the 
American Chemical Society. He is also 
a Phi Beta Kappa, and belongs to 
Alpha Omega Alpha. He has had papers 
published on the Pharmacology of Ni- 
trites and Nitrates and Anemia in the 
Aged. 

Joseph H. White, BPA '42, of Ter- 



24 



the Maryland Magazine 



race Park, Ohio, is a Sales Manager for 
the Formica Corp. He held the rank of 
Lt., USNR. 

Edward H. Price, A&S '42, is living 
in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, and is 
Senior Supervisor of Research and De- 
velopment with the Plastics Department 
of E. I. Dupont de Nemours & Co. He 
was a Major in the Army. The Boy 
Scouts will remember him as District 
Chairman of Chester County, Penn- 
sylvania. 

John Robert Famulari, d.d.s. '43, 
of Brooklyn, New York, has a private 
practice in Dentistry. He held the rank 
of Lt. (sg) USNR. He belongs to Psi 
Omega Fraternity, the American Dental 
Association, and the Catholic Dental 
Guild. 

Mrs. Anna A. Tickett, A&S '43, 
lives in Rockville, Maryland. She is 
Personnel Assistant of the Montgomery 
County Board of Education. Formerly 
she was Secretary of Vickers, Inc., and 
the Federal Trade Commission. 

Donald W. Mintzer, m.d. '44, of 
Baltimore, Maryland, is a practicing 
physician, and was formerly an Asso- 
ciate in Medicine, OPD, at University 
Hospital. He held the rank of Captain, 
USAR. He is member of many profes- 
sional organizations including the 
American Medical Association, Ameri- 
can Geriatrics Society, Association of 
American Medical Colleges. He is also 
a member of the Optimist Club of 
Hamilton, and of Sigma Nu and Nu 
Sigma Nu Fraternities. He is active on 
the staffs of St. Joseph's and University 
Hospitals, on the senior staff of the 
Church Home and Hospital, and the 
courtesy staff of St. Agnes Hospital. 

Herbert A. Radler, d.d.s. '44, of 
Newark, New Jersey, has a private 
practice in Dentistry. He was a Lt. in 
both the Army and the Navy. 

David H. Barker, m.d. '45, lives at 
Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan. He is 
a practicing physician. The rank of 
Captain was his with the M.C. A. U.S. 
He is a member of the American 
Board of Radiology. 

Clarence E. McWilliams, m.d. '46, 
resides in Reisterstown, Maryland, and 
has a general medical practice. He was 
a Major with the Armed Forces. He 
has been President of the Baltimore 
County Medical Association and also 
President of the Reisterstown Kiwanis 
Club. 

Mrs. Elsie S. Beard, A&S '47, lives 
in Baltimore and is a chemist with 
Medical Research National Heart Insti- 
tute, Gerontology Branch. She belongs 
to the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, and the 
American Chemical Society and the So- 
ciety for Experimental Biology and 
Medicine. 

Edward F. Smouse, BPA '47, of 
Oakland, Maryland, is Manager and 
Secretary-Treasurer of Smouse's, Inc. 
(Supermarket). He was S/Sgt. with 
U.S.A.A.F. Jean Smouse, H.Ec. '44, is 



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also a graduate of the University of 
Maryland. They both have many civic 
interests. 

Bernard Leung, m.d. '47, is a resi- 
dent of Hasbrock Heights, New Jersey, 
and has a private practice in that city. 
He was a Captain in the Air Force. 

J. Albert M. Lettre, BPA '48, re- 
sides in Pikesville. Maryland. He also 
received his MAT degree from Johns 
Hopkins. He at present is a teacher of 
History at Baltimore City College. For- 
merly he was Education Advisor and 
Director of Army Education Center, 
Ft. Holabird, Maryland, and held rank 
of Capt. in the USAR. He holds mem- 
bership in Beta Gamma Sigma and Phi 
Delta Kappa Fraternities; and also be- 
longs to the Reserve Officers' Associa- 
tion. 

Sheldon B. Akers, Jr., Engr. '48 
and MA '52, lives in Syracuse, N. Y. 
He is a Mathematician with General 
Electric Co., and formerly worked at 
the Nat'l Bur. of Standards as an Elec- 
tronic Scientist, and also as a Mathema- 
tician for Avion Div. ACF Industries. 
He was Sl/c USNR. He is a member 
of the American Mat Society, IRE 
(Senior Member), Research Society of 
America, and also of Theta Chi and Pi 
Delta Epsilon and Omicron Delta 
Kappa Fraternities. He has had a num- 
ber of papers published in Operations 
Research, Journal of SIAM, IRE Trans, 
on Electric Computers. 

Janet L. Bingner, Edu. '48, now 
lives in Dallas, Texas. She also received 
her Ed.D. Degree from George Wash- 
ington University in 1954. She is Ad- 
ministrator — Dallas College (The Eve- 
ning Div. of Southern Methodist Uni- 
versity). Previously she taught at High- 
land Spring High School in Richmond, 
Virginia. She holds numerous member- 
ships in a number of sororities, among 
which are Phi Kappa Phi, Pi Lambda 
Theta, and is Faculty Adviser to Alpha 
Sigma Lambda. She belongs to the As- 
sociation of University Evening Col- 
leges and the Dallas Citizens Commis- 
sions for Action on Aging. She has 
had an article published in the Person- 
nel & Guidance Journal. 

Mrs. Bobbie F. Hoffman, H.Ec. 
'48, of Long Beach, California, was pre- 
viously a teacher at Washington Nat'l 
Cathedral, and also in the California 
Public Schools. 

Milton Louis Ilgenfritz, BPA '49, 
is an Office Manager of the Allegheny 
Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. and resides in 
Baltimore. He was formerly Assistant 
Auditor of the Savings Bank of Balti- 
more and Treasurer for The Baltimore 
Stationery Co. 

Nick Vukovich, Agr. '49, is a Dis- 
trict Sales Manager and resides in La- 
Habra, California. 

Lawrence Weinberg, Engr. '49, 
lives in Redlands, California, and is a 
Senior Technical Specialist for the 
Lockheed Propulsion Company. Mr. 
Weinberg was formerly Assistant Direc- 



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the Maryland Magazine 



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vision of the Atlantic Research Corpo- 
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the Naval Ordnance Laboratory in 

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1950-1959 

WlLBERT H. McELVAIN, M.I). '50, is 

a I.t. Colonel in the U. S. Air Force, 
stationed at the Office of the Surge n 
Cieneral. Air ( reu Standards. Washing- 
ton. D. ('. He is a member of the 
American Medical Association. Aero- 
space Medical Association. Association 
of U. S. Air Force Flight Surgeons, a 
Diplomate of the American Board oi 
Preventive Medicine in Aviation Medi- 
cine, and a member of the Flying Phy- 
sicians' Association. 

Corii.da C. K.EYSER, H.Ec. '50. is a 
Home Economics teacher at Eastern 
Junior High School in Silver Spring. 
Maryland. 

Herbert J. Langenfei.der, A&S 
'50, lives in Frederick, Maryland, and 
is a Packaging Engineer for Container 
Corporation of America. Formerly, he 
was Assistant Manager for Oliver's 
Store for Men and a Laboratory Tech- 
nician at Baltimore City Hospital. 

Mrs. Lorraine T. Lysack Olmedo, 
Nurs. '51, Educ. '55, was formerly a 
Supervisor at a Premature Nursery, an 
Instructor in Medical and Surgical 
Nursing at the University of Maryland 
School of Nursing and the Boston Uni- 
versity School of Nursing, and a part- 
time general duty nurse in Boston. She 
is presently a housewife and lives in 
Baltimore. Maryland. 

Dr. Robert D. Weekley, m.d. '51, 
lives in Parma, Ohio, where he is a 
practicing physician (Ophthalmology). 
Dr. Weekley is a member of the Ameri- 
can Medical Association and the Ohio 
Medical Association. Academy of Medi- 
cine, Alpha Omega Alpha and is an As- 
sistant Clinical Professor of Ophthal- 
mology at Western Reserve University 
School of Medicine. 

Frederick W. Nesline, Jr., Engr. 
'51, received his M.Engr. degree and his 
Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering 
from Yale University. He is at present 
Manager of the Analytical Research 
Department, Missile and Space Divi- 
sion, of the Raytheon Company, Bed- 
ford, Massachusetts. Mr. Nesline is au- 
thor of numerous technical papers 
which have been published. He lives in 
Lexington. Massachusetts. 

Charles J. Nizolek, BPA '51 of 
Norwalk. Connecticut, is Secretary- 
Treasurer of Bolt Associates, Inc. He 
formerly was Manager in the Adminis- 
tration Department of Olivetti Research 
Center. 

Jacob E. Brown. Agr. '51, is Divi- 
sional Sales Manager of Avon Products, 
Inc. and resides in Newark, Delaware. 



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(Wholesale Distributor) 
501 - 15th ST., SOUTH 



OTis 4-3700 



Arlington, Va. 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 
5-3000 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

SAND & 

GRAVEL 

RE 
5-3000 








WASHINGTON 21, D.C. 







King Bros., Inc. 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SArotogo 7-5S35 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



Look for the Sign 




Serving Baltimore's Finest 
Italian Cuisine 

Open 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. — Closed Mondays 

300 Albermarle St. MU 5-2811 

Baltimore 2, Md. MU 5-2812 



PHONE 474-5100 



B. SUGRUE — PRES. 



NORMAN MO TOR C OMPANY, Inc. 

SALES S&] % SERVICE 



8315 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



Mr. Brown was formerly District Man- 
ager of Southern States Cooperative in 
Richmond, Virginia and Store Manager 
of Southern States Cooperative. 

Mr. and Mrs. Monroe E. Fra- 
leigh, Agr. '52, Nurs. '53, are making 
their home in Mays Landing, New 
Jersey. Mr. Fraleigh is Farm Manage- 
ment Supervisor, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, and County Supervisor of 
Farmers Home Administration. He had 
previously served as Assistant Secre- 
tary-Treasurer of the Production Credit 
Association, as a Quarantine Enforce- 
ment Inspector, U.S.D.A., and a Dairy 
Farmer. Mrs. Fraleigh is the former 
Dorothea Fenwick. 

Saul S. Seltzer, Engr. '52, is Direc- 
tor of Engineering for Towers Marts 
International, Inc., New York, and 
makes his home in Union, New Jersey. 
He was formerly Structural Engineer 
for Knoerle, Graef, Bender & Associ- 
ates, Inc., Baltimore, and Bridge Engi- 
neer for Baltimore County Department 
of Public Works, Towson, Maryland. 
Mr. Seltzer is a Registered Professional 
Engineer in New York State and is a 
member of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers, National Society of 
Professional Engineers, and the Society 
of American Military Engineers. 

Melvin Edward Wiener, BPA '52, 
is living in Richmond, Virginia, and is 
a Digital Computer Programmer-Sys- 
tems Analyst. His former positions in- 
cluded insurance sales agent and de- 
partment store manager. 

Eleanor Louise Emch, H.Ec. '53, 
is a Dietitian and Instructor in Nutri- 
tion at the D. C. General Hospital, and 
is a member of the American Dietetic 
Association, Home Economics Associa- 
tion and Museum of Natural History. 
She was formerly Assistant Chief Dieti- 
tian at Episcopal Hospital and Chief 
Dietitian at Sibley Memorial Hospital. 
She lives in Silver Spring, Maryland. 

Dr. George Charles Peck, m.d. 
'53, is a Diplomate in Plastic and Re- 
constructive Surgery and lives in Pas- 
saic, New Jersey. Dr. Peck is a mem- 
ber of the New Jersey Medical Society, 
American Society of Plastic Surgery. 
Bergen County Medical Society, and 
has published a number of articles on 
various phases of cancer research. He 
has also presented papers before the 
American College of Surgeons and the 
American Association of Anatomists. 

Capt. and Mrs. Sheldon H. Slater, 
A&S '53, Educ. '56, are living in 
Chiengmai, Thailand where Capt. Slater 
is a teacher with the U. S. Air Force. 
He previously was a teacher with the 
Air Force in Denver, Colorado. Mrs. 
Slater is the former Anne L. Bengel. 

Anton Grobani, A&S '54, d.d.s. '58, 
is a practicing dentist and lives in Silver 
Spring, Maryland. He is a member of 
Southern Maryland Dental Society. 
Maimonedes Dental Society, Alpha 
Omega Dental Fraternity and Phi 
Sigma Delta Fraternity. 



28 



the Maryland Magazine 



Bacon for 
breakfast 





Albert F. Goetze, Inc 

CHOICER MEATS 

Baltimore, Md. 



modern 
machinists co. 

Genera/ Machine Work 

MACHINE DESIGN 

MAINTENANCE - AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St., N.W. 

Waihington, D. C. 

CO 5-3300 



t 



Ottenberg's Bakers, 

Inc. 

Quality Bakers 
For Three Generations 




RESTAURANTS 
INSTITUTIONS 



Lincoln 7-6500 
Washington, D. C. 



NORTH 
WASHINGTON PRESS 

Inc. 

We Specialize in Printing 
for Churches and Schools 

5644 3rd Street, N.E. 

WASHINGTON 11, D. C. 

LAwrence 6-8626 



Woodrow Walton Ji nkins. Mil. 
Sci. '54, M.BA. '56, is connected with 
Audit and Analysis Branch of NATO in 
Southern Europe. He is a It. Col. in 
the Armed Services and has been se- 
lected for the Air War College with the 
class beginning in August. He is a Mas- 
ter Navigator, with over 6.200 Hying 
hours, and is an after-hours Instructor 
in Accounting at the University of 
Maryland Overseas Program in Italy. 

Albert H. Kumbar, BPA '54, lives 
in ML Rainier, Maryland, and is a 
Quality Control Analyst. 

Dr. and Mrs. Leonard J. Morsi . 
m.d. '55. A&S '58, are residing in 
Worcester, Massachusetts where Dr. 
Morse is a practicing physician. He 
had served two years as a Captain in 
the Medical Corps of the U. S. Army. 

Leonard Arnold Sikms, A&S '55, is 
Vice President of Free State Equipment 
Co., Inc. and lives in Baltimore. Mars- 
land. He is a member of the Exchange 
Club of Towson and Kappa Alpha Fra- 
ternity. 

Georgia H. Brown, Nurs. '55, M.S. 
'57, is a Supervisor of Dix Pavilian, St. 
Elizabeth's Hospital and lives in East 
Riverdale, Maryland. She was formerly 
Supervisor of the University of Mary- 
land Psychiatric Institute, and is a mem- 
ber of the University of Maryland 
Alumni Association and Nurse's Alum- 
nae Association, and Sigma Theta Tau 
Sorority. 

Dr. John A. Engers, Jr., m.d. '55. 
is in private practice in Baltimore. 
Maryland, specializing in obstetrics and 
gynecology. 

Stuart La Kind, d.d.s. '56, is a 
practicing dentist and resides in Succa- 
sunna, New Jersey. He is treasurer of 
the Gorgas Odontological Society and 
Vice President-Secretary of Alpha 
Omega Fraternity. 

Mr. and Mrs. Laurence I. Ady, 
A&S '56, Educ. '58, live in Orlando, 
Florida, where both are elementary 
school teachers. Both are doing gradu- 
ate work at Rollins College and are 
members of the Florida Education As- 
sociation, Florida Peace Officers Associ- 
ation and University of Maryland 
Alumni Association. Mrs. Ady is the 
former Nancye Lee Hager. 

Harold Aram Sakayan, BPA '57, 
is an attorney in private practice in 
Washington, D. C. He received his 
LL.B. degree from George Washington 
University. He previously served two 
years in the U. S. Army and was an 
attorney for the Federal Trade Com- 
mission. He is a member of the Anti- 
trust Section, American Bar Associa- 
tion. 

John J. Sharer, A&S '57, is an Elec- 
tronics Engineer and is living in Silver 
Spring, Maryland. He is a member of 
the American Physical Society. 

Robert F. Sladek, Sr., Mil. Sci. '57. 
is a Staff Administrator and retired 
Colonel in the U. S. Air Force. Mr. 
Sladek makes his home in Washington. 



KOESTER'S 
TWINS 

PLEASE 



LA 3-1551 



LA 3-1552 



ARISTOCRAT 

LINEN SUPPLY CO., INC. 

614-620 MOSHER STREET 
BALTIMORE 17, MARYLAND 

A Complete Linen Rental Service 
for all commercial establishments 

COATS 

APRONS 

UNIFORMS 

TOWELS 

TABLE LINEN 

WHY BUY? — WE SUPPLY! 



Career in Business 

Day & Evening Classes 
Complete Courses 

Secretarial (Medical & Legal) 

Stenographic, Junior Accounting. 

Write or Phone for Catalogue 

Completely Air-Conditioned 

STRAY ER COLLEGE 

600 Equitable Bldg. LE 9-5626 



July-August, 1963 



29 



RESIDENTIAL IRON WORK 




PORCH & TERRACE HAND 

RAILINGS • BALCONIES 

GATES • COLUMNS 

TRELLIAGE 

INTERIOR STAIR 

RAILINGS 
For Estimate Call 

LA 6-1240 
Washington, D. C. 



IN the MARYLAND SEGMENT 

of GREATER WASHINGTON 

IT'S THE 



Suburban 



Trust 



Company 



34 Offices To Serve You in 

Prince Georges 

and 

Montgomery Counties 

Administration Building 

6495 New Hampshire Ave. 
Hyattsville, Md. 

588-5000 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 
Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



BUY DEFENSE BONDS 



D. C. He is a member of the Air Force 
Association. Senior Member of IRE, 
and Armed Force Communications and 
Electronics Association. 

Georgia C. Claxton McGraw, P.E. 
'57. of Suitland, Maryland is a Physical 
Education teacher in Junior High 
School. 

Mrs. Sheila Silverman Schmidt. 
Educ. '57, is a teacher and is living in 
Miami. Florida. 

Dr. James Grant Stringham, m.d. 
'57, of Salt Lake City, Utah, is a prac- 
ticing pediatrician. He is a member of 
the Salt Lake County Medical Society, 
Utah State Medical Society, and the 
American Medical Association. 

Frank Trotto, Jr.. d.d.s. '58, lives 
in Washington, D. C. and is a practic- 
ing dentist. He served in the Armed 
Services two years and is presently a 
member of the American Dental As- 
sociation, Maryland State Dental Asso- 
ciation. Southern Maryland Dental So- 
ciety, Sphinx. Psi Omega and Alpha 
Phi Delta Fraternities and Junior 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Stephen Jay Saks, BPA '58, is a 
Supervisor of general ledger and report- 
ing departments at Mt. Sinai Hospital 
in New York City. He is Certified 
Public Accountant, a member of the 
Maryland Association of C.P.A.'s and 
a candidate for a Ph.D. degree in Eco- 
nomics at City College of New York. 
He was formerly employed as a Junior 
Accountant at Haskins & Sells, and as 
Assistant Controller, Office Manager 
and Cost Accountant at Consultants 
Bureau Enterprises, technical publishers. 

Leonard Stanley Schneider, d.d.s. 
'58, lives in Baltimore, and is a prac- 
ticing dentist. He is a member of the 
Baltimore City Dental Society, Balti- 
more County Dental Association, Opti- 
mist Club and Alpha Omega Fraternity. 

Rita D. Solow, Nurs. Educ. '58, 
is an Instructor at Lutheran Hospital 
School of Nursing in Baltimore, Mary- 
land. She was formerly Instructor at 
Franklin Square Hospital School of 
Nursing and Head Nurse at Sinai Hos- 
pital. Miss Solow is President of the 
Nurse's Alumnae Association at Sinai 
Hospital, Secretary of the B.A.C.T. Sec- 
tion of Maryland Nurses' Association 
and a member of Maryland and Na- 
tional League for Nursing, Maryland 
Nurses' Association and Adult Educa- 
tion Committee of the Baltimore He- 
brew Congregation, and Delta Phi Epsi- 
lon Sorority. 

Harold C. Green, Agr. '58, is em- 
ployed in the research and development 
department of Yoder Brothers of Flor- 
ida, Inc., Ft. Myers, Florida. 

Alan Sherman, Pharmacy '58, lives 
in Silver Spring, Maryland, and is 
Pharmacy Manager for Giant Food, 
Inc. He is a member of Alpha Zeta 
Omega Pharmaceutical Fraternity. 

Harold M. Zoslow, BPA '59, is 
Public Relations Counsel in Washing- 
ton, D. C. He spent three years in the 



Student's Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

College Park Md. 




Alumni 

Headquarters for 

• CLASS RINGS 

• CLOTH GOODS 

• ETCHED GLASSWARE 

• JEWELRY 

• STATIONERY 



^esw-Uuf. i-tudenti. and 

alumni a£ ike 

fynwe'i.iUy a^ 

Mainland 

J/0 yeaU. 

LUSTinE— 

OUU+no-Lile 

Phil 2u<Uine . . . 
head al win comp.anied 

Baltimore Ave. on Route 1 
Hyattsville, Md. 
WArfield 7-7200 





• j* [tV**^^ 


_f td@/$& 




C^ SALES • 


INSURANCE 


Near University 


of Maryland 


WArfield 7-1010 


& 7-0321 


6037 Baltimore 


Boulevard 


RIVERDALE, MD. 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS. Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Located In the Center of 
the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

MU. 5-1990 BALTIMORE, MD. 



30 



the Maryland Magazine 






Armed Forces and is presently Treas- 
urer of Zeta Beta Tau Alumni Club of 
D. C. Mr. Zoslow has taken graduate 
work in Public Relations at American 
University in D. C. 

Emerson Niel Carey, M.Ed. '59, 
lives in Catonsville, Maryland, and is a 
Guidance Counselor for the Baltimore 
County Board of Education. He previ- 
ously served four years in the Armed 
Forces and was a teacher for the Balti- 
more County Board of Education. He 
is a member of NEA, MSTA, and 
American Personnel and Guidance As- 
sociation. 

Melvin J. Deale, Engr. '59, re- 
ceived his M.S. degree in Civil Engi- 
neering from Stanford University in 
1962. He is an Assistant Area Engi- 
neer for the Bureau of Public Roads, 
and lives in Richmond. Virginia. He is 
an Associate Member of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers and a Junior 
Member of Maryland Society of Pro- 
fessional Engineers. 

Jacqueline Luanne Eads, H.Ec 
'59, is a teacher of eighth grade general 
science and ninth grade journalism and 
a sponsor of a Student Council and 
school newspaper. Miss Eads lives in 
Miami, Florida and is a member of the 
P.T.A., Florida Education Association, 
and National Science Teachers' Asso- 
ciation. 

Edward Brosnan Burlas, P.E. '59, 
is presently a Physical Education 
teacher. He had previously been a 
Driver Training Instructor and Pool As- 
sociation Manager and is a member of 
Phi Alpha Epsilon, MSTA, and NEA. 
He lives in Kensington, Maryland. 



THE SIXTIES 



Joseph N. Lewis, III, BPA '60, is 
an Automobile Insurance Underwriter 
for the Aetna Casualty & Security Com- 
pany. He lives in Washington, D. C. 
and is a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Fraternity. 

William J. Marek, A&S '60, is a 
student at the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine in Baltimore. He 
was formerly a Federal Agent with the 
U. S. Food and Drug Administration. 

Donald L. Price, Engr. '60, lives in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and is a 
Sales Representative for I.B.M. Mr. 
Price formerly held the position of In- 
strument Engineer for the DuPont Cor- 
poration. He is Treasurer of Phi Delta 
Theta Fraternity and House Manager 
of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity. 

Jon Williman Petersen, Engr. '60, 
is a Parts Test Engineer and lives in 
Laurel, Maryland. 

Captain Joan R. Powers, Nurs. '60, 
is Supervisor of an Outpatient Clinic at 
the 389th U.S.A. F. Hospital at Warren 



i*y 



*£Cl; 



•-', 



OLES 



\ - 


' 


* ta 


- 


„ . _.- -. -rjTLijaQC- 






..>. 



ENVELOPE CORPORATION 



Jjallimore i 1 ioneer (envelope Jrtanufadurer 

Established 1912 

Office and Factory: 25th STREET & LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake .{-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 1500 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. 
Washington 5, I). C. 23 l-.i!i7!t 



WILLIAMS 






CONSTRUCTION 






COMPANY 






INC. 






General Contractors 




Highways — Bridges — 


- Airports 


Phone MUrdock 


8660 PULASKI HIGHWAY 


6-1000 


BALTIMORE, 


MD. 



J 



Jfullcr & b'8lbert 

INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 

EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

MEED 



Since 



1920 



Phone— Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 



HARVEY DAIRY 

BRENTWOOD, MD. 

SERVING PRINCE GEORGES 
and MONTGOMERY COUNTIES 

Vour Neighbors 
Buy Our Milk 

• Vitamin D Homogeniied Milk 

• Grade A Pasteuriied Milk 

• Extra Rich Homogeniied 
Vitamin D Milk 

• Fat Free Milk 

• Chocolate Milk 

• Eggs — Strictly Fresh 

• Table Cream 

• Whipping Cream 

• Fresh Orange Juice 



APpleton 7-3434 



Choice of Maryland 

Suburban Residents 

Since 1927 



TH0MSS0N STEEL CO., Inc. 



1120 Connecticut Ave., N.W. 

WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 



FE 8-7880 







THE 


BALTIMORE ENVELOPE 


CO. 










MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 












1020 WEST PRATT STREET 








Phone 


MUlberry 


5-6070 




Baltimore 


23. 


Md. 



July-August, 1963 



31 



WINDOW ■ ON ■ THE • KITCHEN 

Ktioltei&Ua 

SELF-SERVICE 
Dtlicioui food ... All our doitort* arm 
homo-modi popular pri cot 

no lipping . . . air conditioned 

BREAKFAST • LUNCHEON 

DINNER Quality Coffee 5c a cup 

Open Daily and Sunday 

1 1 Ih Street Entrance of 

HOTEL HARRINGTON 

11th t E St.., N.W. Washington, DC. 

NA 8-8140 



The 

Washington Wholesale 
Drug Exchange, Inc. 

Retail Druggist 

Owned Wholesale 
Drug House 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Bard-Avon School 

SECRETARIAL 

Complete secretarial training 

9 months 

Special and pre-college courses 

3 months and 6 months 

DRAMATIC ART AND RADIO 

1- or 2-year courses 

Separately or in combination 

with secretarial 

NEW CLASSES START 
July, September & February 

805 North Charles VE 7-1155 



^IIIIIIiriTllllllllllllllllllllllliirt 

■ ■ 1 


I BETHESDA CINDER BLOCK \ 


■ MANUFACTURING 


CO., Inc. ; 


Complete Line 


of \ 


MASONRY SUPPLIES 


BRICK - CINDER 


BLOCK j 


I River Rd. at B & O R.R. 


OL 4-1616 I 


BETHESDA, MD. 

■ 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24, Md. 



Subscribe to 
MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Air Force Base. Wyoming. Captain 
Powers was formerly Supervisor of the 
Surgical Ward at Ellsworth Air Force 
Base, South Dakota and of the Surgical 
Ward at Wimpole Park Air Force Base, 
England, and a Medical Training Offi- 
cer at Westover Air Force Base, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Billie G. Meese, D.Educ. '61, re- 
sides in Laurel, Maryland, and is Su- 
perintendent of Schools, Children's 
Center, Laurel. 

Ernest Henry Bossard, M.Agr. '61, 
is a Research Assistant in the Poultry 
Department at the University of Mary- 
land and is a member of the D. C. Sec- 
tion of Experimental Biology and Medi- 
cine. 

Paul J. Zalubas, Engr. '61, of Col- 
lege Park, Maryland, is an Aerospace 
Engineer. Mr. Zalubas is a member of 
the American Rocket Society and an as- 
sociate member of the Institute of 
Aerospace Sciences. 

Clifford L. Sayre, Jr., ph.d. Engr. 
'61, resides in Silver Spring, Maryland, 
and is an Associate Professor of Me- 
chanical Engineering at the University 
of Maryland. 

David A. Lingrell, Engr. '61, is a 
Construction Engineer for General 
Services Administration. Mr. Lingrell 
resides in Hyattsville, Maryland, and is 
an associate member of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers. 

John Richard Engberg. A&S '61, 
is a Government Analyst and makes his 
home in Adelphi, Maryland. 

Dr. Henry Lawrence Merring, 
m.d. '62, received his M.S. degree in 
Microbiology in 1957 from George 
Washington University and is at present 
an interne at D. C. General Hospital, 
Washington, D. C. Dr. Merring is a 
member of the American Medical As- 
sociation, Phi Beta Pi Medical Frater- 
nity and the American Guild of Organ- 
ists. 

Col. Gerhart O. Romstedt, U.C. 
'62, has served with the U. S. Army 
since February, 1943, and is presently 
stationed with the Chief Requirements 
Division, office of the Deputy Chief of 
Staff for Logistics with headquarters in 
Washington, D. C. 

Joan Lee Meredith, Nurs. '62, is a 
Psychiatric Nurse at University Hos- 
pital in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Nancy A. Loweth, A&S '62, lives in 
Clinton, Maryland, and is a Mathe- 
matician with the Defense Department. 

Frederick K. Gulck, Educ. '62, 
makes his home in Baltimore. He is a 
Management Trainee for Bethlehem 
Steel Company. 

Sol Rosenstein, Pharm. '62, is liv- 
ing in Baltimore and is a pharmacist. 
He is a member of the American Phar- 
maceutical Association, Baltimore Met- 
ropolitan Pharmaceutical Association, 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
and Alumni Association of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland School of Pharmacy. 



Directory of Advertisers 

Acme I ron Works 30 

Alcazar 27 

American Disinfectant Co 26 

Anchor Post Products Co., Inc 25 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co., Inc 29 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn 24 

Baltimore Envelope Co 31 

Bard Avon School 32 

Herrmann's Laundry 24 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., Inc 32 

Bon Ton Food Products 26 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc 26 

D. Harry Chambers, Opticians 30 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 24 

Del Haven White House Motel 26 

Embassy Dairy 24 

Farmers Cooperative Assn 26 

J. H. Filbert Co 27 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn 27 

Fuller & d' Albert, Inc 31 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co 29 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 32 

Greenebaum's Back Cover 

Harvey Dairy 31 

Hotel Harrington i2 

Kidwell & Kidwell. Inc 25 

King Bros., Inc 28 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 29 

Lustine Chevrolet 30 

Maria's Restaurant 28 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 27 

Modern Machinists Co 29 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc 25 

North Washington Press, Inc 29 

Norman Motor Company, Inc 2S 

Occidental Restaurant 22 

Oles Envelope Corp 31 

Ottenberg's Bakers, Inc 29 

Park Transfer Co 27 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 30 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co., Inc 25 

Seidenspinner Realtor 30 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 28 

Mrs. Smith's Colonial Baking Co 26 

Strayer College 29 

Student's Supply Store 30 

Suburban Trust Co 30 

Sweetheart Bread 26 

Thomsson Steel Co., Inc 31 

Wallop & Son, Insurance 25 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange Inc... 32 

Westinghouse Electric Corp 2i 

Perry < >. Wilkinson 26 

Williams Construction Company, Inc 31 

J. McKenny Willis & Sons, Inc 25 

Windjammer Cruises 26 

York Wholesalers, Inc 28 

Duke Zeibert's Restaurant 27 



32 



the Maryland Magazine 



1963 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 



Date 

HOME GAMES 

September 21 

October 12 
October 19 

November 2 

November 23 

AWAY GAMES 

September 28 

October 5 
October 26 
November 9 
November 1 6 



Opponent 



N. C. STATE 

(Band Day) 

NORTH CAROLINA 
AIR FORCE 

(Parents Day) 

PENN STATE 

(Homecoming) 

VIRGINIA 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

Columbia, S. C. 

DUKE 

Richmond, Va. 

WAKE FOREST 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

NAVY 

Annapolis, Md. 

CLEMSON 

Clemson, S. C. 



Time 

2:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. 

1:30 p.m. 

1:30 p.m. 

8:00 p.m. 
12:00 Noon 
2:00 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. 



Ticket Information 

RESERVED SEATS: $4.00. SEASON, All Home Games, 1963: $20.00. 

WRITE: University of Maryland, Ticket Office, Box 295, College Park, Md. 

CALL: WArfield 7-2807. 

After September 1, 1963, tickets will be on sale at the following locations: 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Activities Building 
College Park 

MITCHEL'S SPORT SHOP 

4543 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Wash., D.C. 

AMERICAN AUTO ASSOCIATION 
1712 G St., N.W., Wash., D.C. 



BACHARACH RASIN CO. 

14 N. Howard St., Baltimore 

NATIONAL SPORTING GOODS CO. 

310 E. Baltimore St., Baltimore 

WHEATON SPORTS SHOP 

2400 University Blvd., West, 
Wheaton 



Grimwh 



OOrtl/4 DIAMOND SALE 

for ®nibemtj> of jWarplanb Alumni 

New Shipment of Imported Diamonds Just Flown In- 

SAVE 30% AND MORE DURING THIS 30 DAY SALE 




$7 79.00 

l/ 2 CARAT 

Regularly $150.00 




$782.00 

MARQUIS 

Regularly $250.00 







$755.00 



EMERALD CUT 

Regularly $225.00 



w c 



How can you tell real diamond values? Both of these diamonds are flawless. Both weight V2 carat, but 
one is worth 40% more than the other! Can you tell which is the more valuable? 



\A 




Diamond "A" was cut by a skilled diamond cutter 
to exact proportions to bring out its exquisite 
beauty. 




Diamond "B" was cut by an unreputable cutter, 
who sacrificed beauty to retain extra weight. Can 
you see the difference? 




HARGE ACCOUNTS INVITED 

No down payment required 
Take a full year to pay 
.Easy weekly or monthly payments 
90 days same as cash 

104 N. Howard St. 
Open Mon. & Thurs. 'til 9 P.M. 



GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES 

We sell for less because we buy for 
less. Greenebaum's is America's old- 
est diamond importer by air. By im- 
porting diamonds direct from Bel- 
gium, we eliminate the wholesaler and 
can easily sell for less. Your money 
refunded in full within 30 days if not 
fully satisfied. 



4 WAY PROTECTION 

* Written guarantee with each sale 

* Full trade in on a larger diamond 
at any time 

* Free diamond appraisal for insur- 
ance 

* Free prong check-up and cleaning 
any time 



2200 E. Monument St. 
Open Mon., Thurs. & Fri. 'til 9 P.M. 



SA 7-4544 




&iwwh 



PE 2-0523 



ftu/K/4 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



Uumni Publication of the University of Maryland 



magazine 




■H CT"«' 



SBfiS** 



tt ». 



Volume XXXV Number Five • September-October 1963 



• Views from the Pacific Sketchbook 
of Mitchell Jamieson 



• South of Baltimore Campus 
to be Established 





Telephone men and women 
fulfill a long tradition 



The first telephone call ever made was a call for help as 
Alexander Graham Bell spilled acid on his clothes: "Come 
here. Mr. Watson, I want you!" 

Ever since that fateful evening in 1876, telephone people 
have been responding to calls for help — and training to 
supply it. 

A tradition of service— a knowledge of first aid — an 
instinct to help — these keep operators at their posts in fire or 
flood — send linemen out to battle blizzards or hurricanes — 
and save lives many times in many ways. 

Over the years, the Bell System has awarded 1.896 
medals to employees for courage, initiative and accomplish- 
ment—for being good neighbors both on the job and off it. 
Here are some recent winners: 




Kenneth E. Ferguson, Installer-Repairman, 
Newport News, Virginia. En route to a repair 
job, he came upon a burning house where a 
blind, bedridden woman lay helpless. Ripping 
out a window, he and a policeman entered the 
flaming room. They were forced out by intense 
heat and smoke. Mr. Ferguson ran to a nearby 
house for blankets. Wrapped in wet blankets, 
the two men re-entered and rescued the woman. 



Mrs. Dorothy Crozier, Operator, San Rafael, 
California. She took a call from a frantic 
mother whose small son had stopped breath- 
ing. After notifying both ambulance and fire 
department, Mrs. Crozier realized that traffic 
was heavy and time short. Over the telephone, 
she taught the mother mouth-to-mouth resus- 
citation. The boy was breathing when firemen 
arrived. Doctors credit his life to her alertness. 

Charles J. Gilman, Communications Service- 
man, Bellwood, Illinois. Driving to an assign- 
ment, he saw an overturned car and found a 
man under it bleeding profusely. Cautioning 
bystanders not to smoke, he helped remove 
the victim. The man's arm was almost sev- 
ered below the shoulder and he seemed in 
shock. Mr. Gilman applied a tourniquet and 
kept pressure on it until an ambulance arrived. 




Leonard C. Jones, Supplies Serviceman, Mor- 
gantown, West Virginia. He noticed a neighbor- 
ing house on fire. Rushing to it, he helped a 
father rescue three young children. Then he 
plunged back into the burning building and, 
guided only by cries through the choking smoke, 
found and saved another child who was hiding 
under a couch in the blazing living room. Min- 
utes after he left, the wooden house collapsed. 

Franklin Daniel Gurtner, Station Installer, Au- 
burn, Washington. He heard a request for emer- 
gency breathing equipment on his radio monitor 
and hurried to the address, where a baby was 
strangling. He found the child's air passage 
was blocked, cleared it, and successfully ad- 
ministered mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Then 
the fire department arrived and applied oxygen 
to help overcome shock. 



m BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 

Oicned by more than two million Americans 



the 




magazine 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXV Number 5 




The Cover: In the memory of many of the faculty and stall', the changing 

of the season from Summer to Autumn had never been as brilliant as it was 
this year. After a long unseasonal drought and summer temperatures, the 
Maryland countryside colored yellow and red. At the peak of the splendor. 
Maryland played its fifth football game and won its first victory. 21-14. over 
the Air Force. A record number of students were enrolled: 19, 000 at College 
Park; 1,800 in Baltimore. At College Park, the foundations for the giant 
Adult Education Center were completed: in Baltimore, more buildings 
crumbled under the wrecker's bar to make way for a greatly enlarged and 
more efficient center. The Regents, in a meeting in October, decided on a 
site south of Baltimore for the establishment of a new Baltimore Campus. A 
new color-sound motion picturing the life and mission of the University was 
made available for group showings. An auspicious start for the 1963-64 
academic year. 



2 



The Pacific Sketchbook of Mitchell Jamieson 



8 



University to Establish Campus South of Baltimore 



10 



Through the Years 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 
EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 
B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 
RICHARD W. CASE, Assistant Treasurer 
DR. WILLIAM B. LONG, M.D. 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 
MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

DR. EDWARD D. STONE, '25, President 

MRS. ERNA R. CHAPMAN, '34, Vice-President 

THE HONORABLE JOSEPH L. CARTER, '25, Vice-President 

VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. BARBARA HARRIGAN, Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



ADVERTISING DIRECTORS 

MRS. H. B. GILLESPIE 
411 Range Road 
Baltimore 4, Md. 
828-9050 



RICHARD F. ROSS 
6136 Parkway! Drive 
Baltimore 12,lMd. 
435-6767 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park, Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March 3 : 1879.-$3.00 per year-Fifty cents the copy-Member of American Alumni Council. 



Views 

from the 

Pacific 

Sketchbook 

of 

Mitchell 

Jamieson 

recording 
the recovery of 

Astronaut 

Gordon Cooper 

Mav 16, 1963 



left: This illustration was drawn 
a moment after Cooper blew the 
hatch, after receiving the signal to 
do so from the NASA Recovery 
Team. Dr. Pollard, M.D., and John 
Graham, leader of the team, 
quickly move to receive Cooper. 
Dr. Pollard is already taking the 
Astronaut's blood pressure. Jamie- 
son drew the solid black lines in 
ink at the time of recording; the 
light gray areas were wash applied 
a few hours later. 



right: After landing in the Pacific, 
the Captain of the U.S.S. Kearsage 
congratulated Cooper for his on- 
the-mark landing (target was a 
three mile radius around the ship). 
Cooper replied, "Sorry I missed 
the third elevator." The "elevator" 
was a lifting device which hoisted 
the capsule from the sea. In this 
illustration, the capsule is being 
moved to the carrier by a whale- 
boat. An inflated collar keeps the 
capsule afloat and a frogman is 
sitting on it. 






' 






^"^ '"' *-*, ^ 



a 











ClaJZQ~Kj2«£f ^>t^^X^i -|Wv 




•• 



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The dramatic moment of the first 
sighting is pictured on the preced- 
ing two pages. This is the scene 
from forward on the carrier flight 
deck. The sky was slightly overcast 
with patches of brilliant sun and 
the sea under it was a deep Pacific 
blue, rolling with white caps. The 
watchers knew that somewhere in 
the void Cooper was coming down. 
It was quiet, expectant. Then a 
sonic boom riddled the air — com- 
plete silence — then a single shout 
and an up-raised arm pointing to 
the capsule, buoyed by a parachute, 
returning to the Earth. Crew, 
marines, correspondents rushed for- 
ward toward the descending 
Cooper. 



left: Now Cooper has been suc- 
cessfully recovered from his orbital 
flight. He talks on the telephone 
to the President and the Secretary 
of Defense. He takes off his flight 
suit, remarking, "I feel like a snake 
shedding its skin." Then he goes 
into Sick Bay for an intensive 
three-quarter hour medical examin- 
ation. Cooper's responses to the 
physician's questions are recorded 
by the Corpsman, pictured to the 
right. 



right: The mood changes abrupt- 
ly. The team from Washington has 
taken over from the scientific re- 
covery team. Honolulu: a bright, 
sunny day; around the city green 
peaks are capped with mist; Coop- 
er passes in triumph down the main 
thoroughfare lined with a varie- 
gated, cheering throng. From Cape 
Canaveral to the Governor's Pal- 
ace, the American Icarus has re- 
turned from the void. 



Mr. Jamieson is an assistant pro- 
fessor in the Department of Fine 
Arts and an artist of international 
reputation. His paintings and 
drawings have been acquired by 
leading museums and by private 
collectors of importance. Last May, 
Mr. Jamieson was invited by the 
National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration to record the re- 
covery from orbital flight of Major 
Gordon Cooper. From decks and 
wardrooms of the aircraft carrier, 
the U.S.S. Kearsage, Mr. Jamieson 
made a unique record of the his- 
toric event. From his four volumes 
of folding scrolls, a few have been 
selected for reproduction here, as 
representing the reality and the 
mystery of the epochal recovery. 



fr 







UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 




NOVEMBER 


23 Football, Virginia, Home 


Characters in Search of an 


2 


Football, Penn State 


26 U. of M. Choir Oratorial 


Author" 




(Homecoming), Home 


28 Thanksgiving Recess Begins 14 


Basketball. West Virginia, 


7,8,9 


University Theater's 




Home 




Production, "Music Man" 


DECEMBER 15 


"The Messiah", U. of M. Men's 


9 


Football, Navy, Away 


1 Thanksgiving Recess Ends 


Glee Club and Women's 


16 


Football, Clemson, Away 


2 Basketball, Virginia, Home 


Chorus 


19 


U. of M. Symphony Orchestra 


10, 11, 12, 13, 14& 15 University 16 


Basketball, Clemson, Home 




Concert 


Theater's Production, "Six 17 


Christmas Concert 




University to Establish Campus South of Baltimore 



The Board of Regents adopted 
on October 14 a recommendation 
of its Branch Campus Committee to 
establish a campus on a 425-acre site 
now owned by the State, bordering on 
the Baltimore Beltway at Wilkens Ave- 
nue, Rolling Road and Shelbourne 
Road. 

At the same time, the Board went 
on record as approving the request for 
funds to acquire a 15-acre single plot 
near the center of the site and 17 ad- 



ditional distributed acres located in the 
same general area bordering on Wil- 
kens Avenue, "considered essential to 
proper development of the campus." 

Seven reasons were cited for the 
selection of the Wilkens Avenue cam- 
pus. These included: 

• "the site is immediately adjacent 
to the Beltway, which is a major trans- 
portation link serving the entire Balti- 
more Metropolitan area, 

• tV.e location can be related to the 



existing campus at College Park and 
the professional school campus in Bal- 
timore City in a manner that will pro- 
mote efficient use of the total resources 
of the university in its development 
and operation, 

• the site contains approximately 
425 acres, an area adequate for the 
long-time development of the campus. 

• basic utilities are available and can 
be extended at moderate cost. 

• present State ownership of the land 



8 



the Maryland Magazine 



insures immediate availability of the 
site for planning to move ahead with- 
out delay and with a higher degree of 
certainty than could be associated with 
land under option, 

• present State ownership and the 
availability of the land for re-assign- 
ment of use makes possible the initia- 
tion of this project with a minimum 
outlay of general construction loan 
funds for land purchase, and 

• this site is complementary of the 
location of the existing public and 
private four-year institutions of higher 
learning when viewed from the stand- 
point of serving the entire Baltimore 
Metropolitan Area." 

In recommending the Wilkens Ave- 
nue site to the Board, the committee 
called attention to a recent summary 
prepared under Board Vice Chairman 
Edward F. Holter, who is head of the 
special committee to study the feasi- 
bility of establishing branches of the 



University. The survey describes the 
various aspects of establishing a branch 
campus of the University covering a 
period of 12 years and as a topic of 
52 meetings. 

"During this time the enrollment at 
College Park has increased from 8,564 
students to the current enrollment of 
18,943. This growth has been more 
rapid than we projected. By 1966 the 
College Park campus will be over- 
crowded. In order to accommodate 
qualified students who will apply for 
admission to the university, a campus 
in the Baltimore area is necessary. The 
time has come to act," the committee 
directed. 

Mr. Richard W. Case, Baltimore at- 
torney, is Chairman of the special sub- 
committee which recommended the 
Wilkens Avenue location today at the 
special meeting of the Board of 
Regents. 



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heat with gas. Call STerling 3-5225 for 
a free survey and estimate by a Gas 
Company expert! 




"And let's talk about 
your future'* 

Most engineers want the same things: good 
pay, stability and, if you're the kind of fellow 
we like to talk to, you want assignments that 
stir your mind. 

GOOD PAY. Where do you stand in the 
educational and experience tables? You'll 
earn accordingly. 

STABILITY. For 77 years Westinghouse 
has been a leader in the scientific field, and 
our far-flung projects have attracted many 
outstanding scientists and engineers. 

STIMULATING ASSIGNMENTS. At 

Westinghouse you'll find research and devel- 
opment projects in molecular electronics, bi- 
onics, optical physics, Pulse Doppler Radar, 
LASER, advanced weapons systems and 
other challenging fields. 

Pull up a chair . . . and let's have a heart 
to heart talk about your future. 

To arrange an interview call SOuthfield 
1-1000, Ext. 657 or send resume to: 

Mr. L. W. Henderson 

DEPT. 404 



Westinghouse 




DEFENSE CENTER 
BALTIMORE 

P. 0. Box 1693, 

Baltimore 3, Md. 

Air Arm Ordnance 

Electronics Systems 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 




W 



September-October, 1963 



RESIDENTIAL IRON WORK 






.SINCE 



PORCH & TERRACE HAND 

RAILINGS • BALCONIES 

GATES • COLUMNS 

TRELLIAGE 

INTERIOR STAIR 

RAILINGS 
For Estimate Call 

LA 6-1240 
Washington, D. C. 



Bacon for 
breakfast 




Albert F. Goetze, Inc. 

CHOICER MEATS 
Baltimore, Md. 




King Bros., Inc 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SAratoga 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



Subscribe to 

MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Through 

The 

Years 



1895-1919 

Thomas Norris Copenhaver, ll.b. 
'97, was the oldest living member of the 
Baltimore Bar Association. He died 
July 10, 1963. He was a partner in 
the law firm of Hinkley and Singley. 
He and Mrs. Copenhaver were the 
oldest living charter members of Wilson 
Memorial Methodist Church where Mr. 
Copenhaver has served in many official 
capacities for 47 years. 

J. Francis Dammann, ll.b. '03, of 
Chicago, Illinois, died on February 12, 
1963. 

Dr. F. W. Gettier, d.d.s. '04, of 
Baltimore practiced in his profession 
until last May when he retired at the 
age of 81. For the last 30 years he 
specialized in the field of prosthetics. 

Stuart B. Shaw, Agr. '04, was pom- 
ologist in the Maryland extension serv- 
ice from 1915 to 1944. During this 
time he served the State as secretary 
of the horticultural society, chief of the 
Department of Marketing and presi- 
dent of the National Association of 
State Marketing Officials. He was a 
master Mason, charter member of the 
College Park Rotary Club, senior war- 
den of St. Andrews Church, and for 
ten years was treasurer of College Park, 
and until recently was also treasurer of 
the city's fire department. He also be- 
longed to Epsilon Sigma Phi and Kap- 
pa Alpha fraternities. 

Dr. J. Leroy Wright, m.d. '08, for- 
mer warden of the Maryland House of 
Correction, died September 10, 1963 at 
the age of 77. After receiving his M.D. 
he began teaching anatomy at the 
University of Maryland School of Den- 
tistry and remained there until appointed 
resident physician at the Maryland 
Training School for Boys at Loch 
Raven. During this residency, he also 
served as medical consultant at the 
Maryland House of Correction at Jes- 
sup, and was appointed in 1939. He 
served in this capacity until 1951. In 
1951 he was appointed as superinten- 
dent of Bonnie Blink, the home for 
Maryland Masons. He was also a mem- 
ber of Boumi Temple and was a 32d 
degree Mason. 

Dr. Charles F. Strosnider, m.d. 
'09, of Goldsboro, was elected as an 
honorary life member in the Alumni 
Association in 1959, after practicing 
medicine for 50 years. He is still 
active in his profession, working every 
day. 

Elva Lydia Dean, Nurs. '13, of 



W*i 



HOTEL JoPPLY CO. 

EST Purveyors of Fine 19 27 

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Frozen Foods 
Food Specialties 

To Hotels. 

Institutions, Shins. 

Clubs, Etc 



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227 S. 

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BALTIMORE, MD. 



duller $c b'iHUjert 

INCORPORATED 



supply 

EVERY 
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NEED 



Since 



1920 



Phone — Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



The Mccormick asbestos co. 

INSULATION CONTRACTORS 

for 

HOT and COLD 

Distributors for 

Owings Corning Fiberglas 

3620 Woodland Ave. MO 4-6040 

Baltimore, Md. 



Anchor Fence 


Anchor Post Products, Inc. 


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ME 3-6500 


BETHESDA . OLiver 2-5270 


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ANNAPOLIS .....COIonial 8-3451 


GEN BURNIE SOuthfield 1-0190 


HAVRE DE GRACE ENterprise 9-6500 



JO 



the Maryland Magazine 



Elkton, Maryland, died suddenly at her 
home on July 16, 1963. 

1920-1929 

Brig. Gen. Edward B. McK.ini.ey, 
U.S.A. RET., Agr. '20 of Nicholas- 
ville, Kentucky passed away on July 15, 
1963. 

E. Calvin Donaldson, A&S '21, for- 
mer city councilman of Laurel, Mary- 
land died on June 14, 1963. After 
graduation, he joined the Chemistry 
Department of the University of Mary- 
land and remained there until 1951, 
when he retired from the position of 
inspector in the State Inspection Serv- 
ice at the University. He was a mem- 
ber of Alpha Chi Sigma, professional 
Chemical Fraternity, Phi Delta Theta 
and Phi Chi Alpha. He served as Mas- 
ter of the Laurel Wreath Lodge #149, 
A.F. & A.M. in 1927 and again in 
1937. He also served as Past Patron 
of Laurel Chapter No. 75, Order of 
the Eastern Star. He was very active 
in the first Methodist Church of Laurel. 

Dr. Bruce Barnes, m.d. '21 is prac- 
ticing medicine in Seaford, Delaware. 

Mrs. Bertha E. Topkis, Agr. '22, 
is a housewife, and also a part time in- 
surance agent. Previously, she held a 
position of examiner at the U. S. Civil 
Service Commission for 15 years. Be- 
sides her education at the University of 
Maryland, she also attended George 
Washington University for two semes- 
ters and the Department of Agriculture 
Graduate School for two semesters. She 
is extremely active in the American Le- 
gion Auxiliary Program, having held 
many positions of responsibility. 

William B. Belt, Engr. '23, is cur- 
rently manager of the Technical De- 
partment of Moeganite, Inc. Previously 
he worked with the General Electric 
Company as service engineer. He 
served during the First World War as 
a Private from 1918-1919. He was 
chairman of Technical Committee of 
Carbon Section of National Electrical 
Manufacturers Association for two 
years. His article "Practical Aspects of 
Brush Contact Stability" was published 
in the American Institute Electrical En- 
gineer Paper 54-89. 

John J. Fitzpatrick, ll.b. '24 also 
took graduate study in Law at George- 
town University, 1925-1926. He is a 
vice president of the New York Chicago 
& St. Louis R.R.. with offices in Cleve- 
land, Ohio. Previously he held positions 
as assistant general attorney of the 
B&ORR. general attorney, C&ORR, and 
chairman of the Traffic Education As- 
sociation of Eastern Railroads. He be- 
longs to the Union League, Chicago 
and Duquesne Clubs. 

Phillip Heller Sachs, ll.b. '28 
has been re-elected chairman for the 
coming year of the Metropolitan Trans- 
it Authority, which regulates all mass 
transit in the Baltimore metropolitan 
area. 




WELCOMI 
BACK! 






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ROEBUCK AND CO. 



Momlaw min Retail Districl 

North i. venue al Harford Road 

Ritchie Hi-Waj Shopping Center 



THE 

E. A. KAESTNER 

COMPANY 

DAIRY & CREAMERY 
APPARATUS 

5401 PULASKI HIGHWAY 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Bard-Avon School 

SECRETARIAL 

Complete secretarial training 

9 months 

Special and pre-college courses 

3 months and 6 months 

DRAMATIC ART AND RADIO 

1- or 2-year courses 

Separately or in combination 

with secretarial 

NEW CLASSES START 
July, September & February 

805 North Charles VE 7-1155 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24, Md. 




OLES ENVELOPE CORPORATION 

Jjalthnorc's [Pioneer Onveiope Jrianufachirer 

Established 1912 

Office and Factory: 25th STREET & LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake 3-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 1500 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. 
Washington 5, D. C. 



231-3979 



September-October , 1963 



11 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 
5-3000 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

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WASHINGTON 21, D.C. 







VICTOR CUSHWA & SONS 

MANUFACTURERS OF "CALVERT" COLONIAL FACE BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. WASHINGTON, D. C. 

701 N. ROYAL ST. ALEXANDRIA, VA. 

Sales Representatives In Principal Eastern Cities 



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Hyattsville, Md. 
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WASHINGTON. D. C. 

AREA CODE 202 
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ARUNDEL FEDERAL 

Savings and Loan Association 

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Savings accounts insured up 

to $10,000 — Federal Savings & 
Loan Insurance Corporation 

355-9300 



1930-1939 

Dr. Louis Robert Schooman, m.d. 
'30 of Frederick, Maryland is in the 
private practice of medicine. He holds 
the rank of Lt. (M.C.) USNR. 

Dr. Percival Spitzen, d.d.s. resides 
in Elizabeth, New Jersey and has a pri- 
vate practice there. He is a Mason, and 
a member of the Elks. 

Dr. Henry Wigderson, m.d. '31 is 
currently practicing medicine in Jamai- 
ca, New York. 

Paul M. Ambrose, A&S '31, also 
received his M.S. from the University 
of Maryland in 1932. He is presently 
with the U. S. Bureau of Mines as a 
physical scientist. Previously he served 
the Bureau as a Metallurgist and as a 
physical science administrator. He is a 
member of Lambda Chi Alpha, Alpha 
Chi Sigma, The American Chemical 
Society, Sigma Xi and the Rotary Club 
of College Park. He has had numerous 
papers published in metallurgical pub- 
lications. 

Alexander Gordon, III, ll.b. '34, 
died suddenly on July 11, 1963. He 
was a native of Baltimore, graduated 
from Yale University in 1931. He was 
with the firm of Armstrong, Machen, 
Allen & Eney until 1944, when he be- 
came trust officer for the Maryland 
Trust Company, and was vice president 
of that company from 1953 until 1958. 
From 1958-1961 he was vice president 
in charge of the Trust Department of 
that firm, when he retired. He was 
executive director of the Maryland 
State Bar Association. He was active 
in many philanthropic and social organ- 
izations, and performed many important 
duties for the Church of the Good 
Shepherd in Ruxton. 

Dr. George E. Dorman, m.d. '34 
is in private practice at Emporium, 
Pennsylvania. He is a member of the 
Coroner Cameron Co. and past presi- 
dent of the Andrew Kaul Memorial 
Staff. 

Andrew Lawrie, Esq., A&S '34 
with two years at the University of 
Maryland, he has an LL.B. '38 from the 
Rutgers University. He is a practicing 
lawyer. He formerly was a member of 
the city council, East Orange, New 
Jersey, and former chairman of New 
Jersey State Bar Association Commit- 
tee on Insurance Law. 

Roland A. Linger, Engr. '34, also 
holds an LL.B. from Georgetown Uni- 
versity. He is at present a patent at- 
torney with RCA, and manager of the 
Washington office, and has been with 
the same firm since 1935. He is a 
member of the Masons and the Eastern 
Star. He is also a Scoutmaster. 

Mary Frances Nichol, A&S '34, 
formerly held a position of laboratory 
technician, and is at present a house- 
wife. 

Charles H. Burry, Engr. '34 is 
assistant to the president of General 
Precision, Inc. He has held a number of 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 



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other positions with Olin Mathieson, 
Bendix Avio Corp., and The (oca 
Cola Co. He also attended Georgetown 
University where he studied law lor one 
year, and New York University where 
he studied business for one year. 

1940-1949 

Betty Hottei. Smith (Mrs. John 
Philip Smith, Jr.) "40, now a home- 
maker, was previously employed in sub- 
stitute teaching and the American Red 
Cross. She holds memberships on the 
Board of Lady Managers, Alexandria 
Hospital; Northern Virginia Alumnae 
Association. She is President of the 
Parent-Faculty Association of St. Mar- 
garet's School. She is also a member 
of KKG Sorority, the Belle Haven 
Women's Club, and the Garden Club of 
Belle Haven. 

Ralph J. Albarano, Educ. '40, now 
lives in Duncanville, Pennsylvania. He 
is in business as a general contractor, 
and was previously a school teacher. 
He was in the armed services from 
1940-47, and was a Lt. Col. He has 
held the postion of commander of the 
VFW. 

Lawrence W. Auerbach, A&S '40 
of Roslyn, New York is vice president 
of Auerbach Bath Robe Corp., presi- 
dent of John Richard Sales Corp. and 
chairman of the Board of Sebor, Inc. 
He was a Staff Sgt. with Military Intel- 
ligence & Interpolation from 1943-1946. 
He has held membership on the board 
of directors of the Convalescent Home 
of N. Y., Inc., past president of the 
Civic Association, and Pines Club. He 
is also a member of Tau Epsilon Pxi — 
undergrad. 

Dr. Daniel C. Barker, m.d. '40 of 
Fairfield, Connecticut is a physician in 
private practice. He holds member- 
ship in the American Medical Associa- 
tion, the American Academy of General 
Practice, the Connecticut State Medical 
Society and the Connecticut Academy 
of General Practice. 

Sam Harris, BPA '40 of Baltimore, 
is a partner of Harris & Katz. He was 
formerly manager of Scherlis & Katz 
Fish Co. He is on the board of direct- 
ors of the ZOA, the Beth El Men's 
Club and Silver Birch S.C. 

Daniel Swern, Ph.D. '40, a native 
of New York City, received his BS de- 
gree from the College of the City of 
N.Y. in 1935 at the age of 19; his M.A. 
degree from Columbia University in 
1936. He is a Phi Beta Kappa and a 
member of Sigma Xi Fraternities. He 
was in Federal Service in 1936, and has 
been teaching advanced organic chem- 
istry and high polymer chemistry at 
Drexel since 1954. He received the 
Arthur S. Flemming Award before he 
was 40. In 1955, and in that same 
year, he was given the USDA highest 
honor, the Distinguished Service Award, 
among others. He is a member of nu- 
merous chemistry societies. He has just 



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been appointed as senior investigator at 
the Fels Research Institute of Temple 
University's School of Medicine and 
Professor of Chemistry in the Uni- 
versity's College of Liberal Arts. 

1950-1959 

Donald M. Shipley, Engr. '50, M.S. 
'62, of Beltsville, Maryland is an areo- 
space engineer at NASA. Formerly he 
was mechanical engineer, Johns Hop- 
kins Univ. APL; mechanical engineer of 
Schuttig & Co., Inc.; and mechanical 
engineer of the National Scientific Labs, 
Inc. During World War II he was 
Seaman 1/c with the USN. He is a 
member of the American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers. He also belongs 
to the Tuscan Lodge No. 202, AF&AM, 
and he is a member of the Free State 
Post of VFW. 

Grace Binkley Hill, A&S '50, died 
on September 2, 1963 at her home in 
College Heights Estates, Maryland. She 
was a nationally known microbiologist. 
She wrote several scientific papers relat- 
ing to the study of diseases produced by 
fungus infections. She was employed 
by the Veterans Administration at the 
Army Institute of Research at Walter 
Reed Hospital. She was president of the 
Washington chapter of Alpha Xi Delta 
Sorority from 1956-1958. 

Richard B. Kurtz, Eng. '50, has re- 
cently been appointed group leader at 
Chemstrand Research Center, Durham, 
North Carolina. Prior to this appoint- 
ment, he was with Chemstrand's nylon 
plant at Pensacola, Florida. Before com- 
ing to Chemstrand in 1955, Kurtz was 
with Merck and Co. in Virginia. He 
attended the Johns Hopkins University 
before getting his degree from Mary- 
land. 

Harold S. McGay, Jr. BPA '50, re- 
siding in Mt. Lakes, New Jersey, is the 
director of Institutional Sales, Gran- 
bery, Marache & Co., Inc., member of 
the N. Y. Stock Exchange of which he 
is a vice president & director. Previous- 
ly he was manager of New York Insti- 
tutional Sales, McDonnell & Co. He 
served in the Navy from 1943-46. He 
is a member of the Bond Club of N. Y. 
and several other social clubs. His 
fraternity is Alpha Tau Omega. 

David F. Baker, Agr. '50 is living 
in Seaford, Delaware. He is president 
of the Baker Chemical & Equipment 
Company; served with the Armed 
Forces as a corporal from 1942 to 
1945. 

Dr. Teresa Silverman, Phar. '50, 
of Memphis, Tennessee is a physician on 
the staff of the Tennessee Psychiatric 
Hospital, and an instructor at the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee Medical School. 
Previously she worked as a registered 
pharmacist in Virginia. She is a mem- 
ber of the AMA Society, the Memphis 
Medical Society and The American 
Business Women Association. She has 
had several articles published. 




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14 



the Maryland Magazine 



Sadell Roberta Ruths, Educ. '51, 
of Baltimore, is presently a teacher. 

Russel T. Rooks, Agr. '51, is living 
in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Currently, 
he is field supervisor of the Lehigh 
Valley Coop Farmers in that area. He 
was an SM 2/C, U. S. Navy 1944-1946. 
He at one time held the position of 
director — National Association of Dairy 
Plant Fieldmen. 

Harris Jack Winkelstein, i.i.b. '5 1 . 
also has an LL.M. Degree from the 
Catholic University of America. He is 
serving as an attorney for a Gov- 
ernment Agency. He was a Private with 
the Armed Forces from 1943-1945. He 
belongs to the American Bar Associa- 
tion and the Federal Bar Association. 



THE SIXTIES 

Irving Jacob Raksin, Phar. '60, of 
Baltimore, is presently a dental student 
at the University of Maryland. His 
pharmacy fraternity is Alpha Zeta 
Omega. He is also a member of the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, 
and the American Dental Association, 
and is a member of the Alpha Omega 
Dental Fraternity. 

Anita Seaton Thompson (Mrs. 
Richard) H.Ec. '60, of Silver Spring, 
Maryland, is a typist with the Post 
Office Department, and was formerly a 
records clerk at Chanute AFB. 

James W. Sanders, Jr., Agr. '60, of 
Takoma Park, Maryland, has been 
named manager of Sealtest Food's sales 
branch in Annapolis. He previously 
was assistant wholesale sales manager 
at Sealtest's main plant in Baltimore, 
and has been working in the Company's 
Baltimore district since September, 
1962. 

Lt. Col. John F. Driftmier, U.C. 
'61, of the U. S. Marine Corps, died 
March 25, 1963. 

Miss Tawney A. Mohler, Ed. '61, 
has been appointed registrar at the 
Baltimore College of Commerce. She 
assumed her new duties on July 15, 
1963. She previously taught in the 
Baltimore City School System at the 
junior high level. She will be working 
particularly with students studying for 
their B.S. degree in Business Adminis- 
tration, Management, Accounting or 
Marketing. 

Major Duane E. Russell, U.C. 
'61, has accepted a position as assistant 
professor of Air Science at Ball State 
Teachers College at Muncie, Indiana. 
Major Russell also graduated from Air 
Tactical School, Command and Staff 
School, and the Industrial War College 
of the Armed Forces. His most recent 
assignment was as a Staff Intelligence 
Operations Officer. He has been a mem- 
ber of the U. S. Air Force since 1943. 

Miss June Lee Walker, A&S '62, is 
one of 18 women students accepted to 
the second year of the Harvard Univer- 



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sity Graduate School of Business Ad- 
ministration. She completed the Har- 
vard-Radcliffe Program in 1963. 

Douglas Warren McKay, Engr. 
'63, joined the Technical Division for 
the Humble Oil & Refining Company, 
Baytown, Texas, during the summer, 
and was assigned to the Butyl and Buta- 
diene Section. He will enter the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology in Sep- 
tember and will begin working toward 
his Ph.D. degree in Chemical Engineer- 
ing. 

Kenneth W. Groshon, BPA '63, of 
Baltimore has been commissioned a sec- 
ond lieutenant in the United States Air 
Force upon graduation from Officer 
Training School. He is being reassigned 
to Moody AFB, Georgia, as a fuel offi- 
cer. He is a member of Tau Kappa 
Epsilon. 

Miss Barbara A. Sorrill, M.A. '63, 
has accepted career employment in the 
Federal Service with Colonial National 
Historical Park, Yorktown, Virginia, 
under the United States Department of 
the Interior. 

Elmer (Bud) Laurent, BPA '63, 



native of Breckenfirdge, Pennsylvania, 
Georgia. He is a member of Lambda 
Chi Alpha fraternity. 

Dr. Francis X. Geczik, D.D.S. '63, 
also holds a B.S. degree from Iona 
College, New Rochelle, New York. He 
recently completed the orientation 
course for officers of the Medical Serv- 
ice in the U. S. Air Force. He is being 
reassigned to the 354th Tactical Hos- 
pital at Myrtle Beach AFB, South Caro- 
lina, where he will practice as a dentist, 
and holds the rank of captain. 

Ralph W. Jacobson, d.d.s. '63, also 
attended Emory University in Atlanta, 
Georgia. He recently went on active 
duty with the United States Air Force 
after completing the orientation course 
for officers of the Medical Service. He 
is being reassigned to the USAF hos- 
pital at Peace AFB, New Hampshire, 
where he will practice as a dentist, and 
will hold the rank of captain. He is 
also a member of Alpha Omega fra- 
ternity. 

Homer Sandford Piper, U.C. '63, 
has been appointed to a position in the 
Federal Service. 




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16 



the Maryland Magazine 



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MARYLAND HOSPITALITY 

When playing' hosts to guests from out of town, Baltimoreans are now 
frequently including a visit to McCormick's Friendship Court in their tour 
of picturesque and historic sites. Few places afford a more sweeping view 
of the Baltimore harhor as it stretches toward storied Fort McHenry. 

McCormick & Company's hostesses, all well versed in the historical 
and romantic lore of the spice and tea trade, are ever ready in Friendship 
Court to assist you in providing a friendly welcome to Baltimore. Also 
as part of McCormick hospitality, a refreshing cup of tea or coffee awaits 
guests in Ye Okie Tea House. 



McCORMICK & CO., INC.— "The House of Flavor 



Volume XXXV Number Six • November-December 1963 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 




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LEADERS ARE BORN 




THEN MADE 



In our complex world, the "born leader" isn't enough. 

He needs training so he will possess the knowledge, 
technical skill, and the culture and vision that dis- 
tinguish the leader from the rank-and-file. 

These assets are, for the most part, the product of 
higher education. In fact America must count on 
college-trained leaders to hold our position in many 
areas ... in science and invention, in business, 
trade, and jobs, in our living standard and moral 
influence. 

But there are danger signs. Higher education is in 



trouble — some colleges face shortages. The big test 
is just ahead when applicants at colleges will dou- 
ble. To maintain our world lead, we must maintain 
our colleges — with enough classrooms, laboratory 
facilities and competent teachers. 

College is America's best friend. Support the college 
of your choice. 



If you want a clearer picture of how the college situation 
affects all of us, write for a free booklet to: HIGHER EDU- 
CATION, Box 36, Times Square Station, New York 36, N.Y. 



-/\- HIGHER EDUCATION 




KEEP IT BRIGHT 



Published as a public service in cooperation with 
The Advertising Council and The Council for Financial Aid to Education. 







*W* S 



the 




magazine 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXV Number 6 



IVTairylanLci ... ,..,. 




The Cover: Perhaps the most eloquent view of the University todaj is 

found in the faces of its students. I his excellent photograph was taken 
from the balcony of the Business and Public Administration and (lass- 
room Building by James D. Spears, a senior majoring in Journalism. 
Jim hails from Jessup, Maryland. 



2 



17 



The Maryland Engineer 



I \J Maryland Engineering Alumni in an All American 
City 

1 J^ A New Professional Campus Takes Shape in 
Baltimore 

1 3,715 Alumni Contribute to the Greater University 
of Maryland Fund 



Homecoming 



18 



Alumni and Campus Notes 



20 



Through the Years 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 
EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 
B. HERBERT BROWN, Seoretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 
RICHARD W. CASE, Assistant Treasurer 
DR. WILLIAM B. LONG, M.D. 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 
MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



DR. EDWARD D. STONE, '25, President 

MRS. ERNA R. CHAPMAN, '34, Vice-President 

THE HONORABLE JOSEPH L. CARTER, '25, Vice-President 

VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. BARBARA HARRIGAN, Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



ADV ERTISING DIRECTORS 

MRS. H. B. GILLESPIE 
411 Range Road 
Baltimore 4, Md. 
828-9050 



RICHARD F. ROSS 
6136 Parkway'Drive 
Baltimore 12, Md. 
435-6767 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park, Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March 3 1879.-$3.00 per year Fifty cents the copy- Member of American Alumni Council. 




THE MARYLAND ENGINEER 



THERE ARE FEW GROUPS IN OUR NATION WHOSE WORK IS SO MUCH 
taken for granted and so little understood by the public." Dr. 
Hugh L. Dryden, Deputy Administrator, National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration, who said that recently is not a man given to 
extravagant statements. He is in an activity teeming with science, engi- 
neering, industry, and, public service, and he is in a position to know 
what he is talking about. For more than 40 years he has worked closely 
with engineers and scientists as a participant and administrator. . . . 

It is really not surprising that engineering should be so little under- 
stood because the work of engineers is so much wrapped up in every- 
thing about us — conveniences and necessities — that we take engineering 
and the work of engineers for granted. 

by Dr. Frederic T. Mavis, Dean of the College of Engineering 

the Maryland Magazine 



Engineering is a "behind the scenes" profession which 
is revealed far more in what engineers have done than in 
what they are doing — or in what they are prepared to do 
for everyday folk. 

Let's start with the professions — the learned professions. 
Someone has said that there are five — each dealing with 
something vitally important to many. These professions are 
medicine, the ministry, law, teaching, and engineering. A 
physician is concerned with man's body; a minister with his 
soul; a lawyer with his rights; a teacher with his mind; ami 
an engineer with the conveniences and necessities that con- 
tribute to his well-being in a civilized world. Think about 
that for a minute and you can see why engineers are so much 
taken for granted and why they are so little understood by 
the public. The things that engineers do in contributing to 
the conveniences and necessities for life in a civilized world — 
the work of engineers — is incredibly broad; and the ingenuity 
of man (the engineer) does not show in his work (in the 
things that you and I want and are willing to buy). 

Think a bit about men you know in these five professions. 
Everyone living in this country has had something to do with 
a physician. Whether he be general practitioner or specialist 
we look to him with confidence when we are sick or in- 
jured. . . . The minister, be he Protestant, Catholic, Jew ... is 
another professional man whom we respect, in whom we have 
confidence, and to whom we turn for matters spiritual. . . 
When we wish to avoid legal entanglements — or when we 
need help to get out of them — we turn to the best lawyer we 
can afford to advise us, to safeguard our rights, or to plead 
our cases. . . As for the teacher — he is often misunderstood 
by his students for demanding too much; and by their parents 
for not doing for Johnny what they themselves have been 
unwilling or unable to do for him. . . . And this leads us 
to consider perhaps the least understood of these five profes- 
sional men — the engineer. 

In the United States there are some 360,000 engineers 
affiliated with 29 national engineering societies which make 
up Engineer's Joint Council. There is about one professional 
engineer for every 500 men, women, and children- -and since 
so many of them work "behind the scenes" it is not surpris- 
ing that you may not know one or hear him say what he does. 
Let me quote a few terse comments about engineers and 
scientists from various sources: 

• "Scientists make it known; engineers make it useful." 

• "Scientists split the atom; engineers design and build the 
atomic power plants." 

• "All science known today would benefit nobody if it 
were not applied by engineers to manufacturing, con- 
struction, mining, agriculture, or the generation of 
power." 

• "Simply stated, engineers apply the sciences to give 
people use of nature's materials and forces." 

• "Scientists reveal what may have been unknown to man 
since the beginning of time; but engineers create and 
put within man's reach things (conveniences and neces- 
sities) which have never before existed." 

• "Engineers direct the great sources of power in nature 
for the use and convenience of man." 

In short, scientists make it known chiefly to one another; 
engineers make it useful and economical to everyone — to 
you and me. 

But don't jump to the conclusion that an engineer must 



be a superman. Far from it! He must have vision .hkI imagi- 
nation, yes! He must know mathematics and the physical 
sciences well enough to put them to use; he cannot be con- 

lenl merely to talk or write about them although he must 
be able tO talk and write well enough to communicate his 
ideas and to share them with others. I he scientist writes 
chiefly tor his peers; the businessman lor his customers and 
fellow employees; but the engineer, in his protession.il wort 
must communicate in words, pictures, anil numbers with 

scientists, businessmen, technicians, craftsmen ... in lan- 
guages (verbal, graphic, and numeric) which must be precise 
and adequate to get things clone right. While it is desirable 
for everyone to know a language besides his own. in America 
it is essential that the engineer learn to use 1 Dglish well .is 
his verbal language. Unlike any other business or profession 
the other "languages" of engineering — graphic and numeric 
are universal. 



A 



■ N KNGINI 1 R, AHOVI til I I si. is \ REALIST. UNTII HE 
brings his visions, his dreams, his ideas . . . down to earth — 
down to reality — he is not practicing his profession and serv- 
ing society as an engineer. Analyses, plans, designs, reports, 
economic and feasibility studies, are all part ot an engineer s 
work in the early stages of a project. They are carried out 
by teams of men and women who help to work out the de- 
tails. It is the engineer's capability to conceive and design 
things that are useful to civilized man that is the hallmark 
of the professional engineer. 

While engineering involves mathematics and physical 
sciences, it involves even more the management of men and 
material resources to get things done adequately, economical- 
ly, usefully, and on time. So in the areas of mathematics and 
physical sciences that he can use, the engineer cannot be 
content merely to know — he must know his sciences, his ma- 
terials, his teams, and his other resources well enough to 
make them all work together usefully and realistically to come 
out adequately, economically, and on time with a useful or 
marketable product or process. 

In business, industry and public service an engineer will 
find himself handicapped unless he can plan and organize 
a job, and delegate and supervise parts of it — keeping things 
moving on schedule. An engineer must learn to manage team 
effort. As he practices engineering — whether it be in in- 
dustry, public service, or private practice — he has an im- 
portant job to organize, to delegate, to supervise ... in short, 
to do well his job, which is indeed an essential part of man- 
agement. 

Engineering involves the art of making decisions — de- 
cisions concerning methods, materials, money, men. . . "De- 
cision making" is more than "problem solving". Real engi- 
neering decisions are seldom based on absolutely clear-cut 
alternatives; and they are seldom made with complete evidence 
to support them. Yet when the time for analysis, talk, and 
further reflection runs out, someone must make an engineer- 
ing decision so that work goes on. In engineering enterprise 
that decision is made by an engineer. An engineer must learn 
to make decisions and not fret about them afterward: he 
cannot turn important decision making over to a committee 
or to a computer. Good decisions are the product of good 
mind-power and good experience — essentials to the practice 
of engineering at all times! 





Studies in turbulent flow in water. The pattern is illustrated 
by periodic electrical pulses in a submerged platinum wire. 




Studies in turbulent flow in air. A pattern is illuminated by 
an electric spark discharge. 



What do engineers do? What have engineers done? What 
will engineers be called on to do in the future? . . . Let's 
look at a leaf from recent history. . . . 

Today's engineers within my lifetime have linked science 
and management in countless ways. Transportation of per- 
sons and goods has evolved from horse-drawn vehicles and 
one-cylinder automobiles on mud roads to the automobiles 
and trailer-trucks on superhighways today. Airplanes — un- 
known in our early years — now fly coast-to-coast and round- 
the-world in a few hours. Voice communication has changed 
from the local party-line telephone and wax cylinder phono- 
graph to a world-wide telephone network at our finger-tips — 
to radio, TV, Hi-Fi, Telstar. . . . The private well and privy 
have been replaced by regional water supply systems and 
systems for collecting and disposing of wastes — and typhoid 
and dysentery are no longer known in American cities. 
Heat, light, and power are at our finger-tips in our homes, 
offices, and factories; this was not so 50 years ago. Nuclear 
fission and fusion conceived and developed by team effort of 
scientists, engineers, and industry and government, have pro- 
duced fantastic sources of power for both destruction and 
human betterment. Farming has been mechanized in progres- 
sive America, replacing the horse-drawn walking plow and 
cultivator; and the processing and distribution of food, as we 
know it today, would have been inconceivable 50 years ago. 
Through chemistry, scientists and engineers have created new 
products, new foods, synthetic fibers, plastics . . . whole new 
industries — just during a short part of our lifetime. To all 
of these things the professional engineer has contributed 
mightily. 




N, 



Flow patterns produced by dye streamers are used as an aid 
in the mathematical formulation pertaining to the generation 
of nuclear energy. 




OW LET US TURN THE PAGES OF HISTORY AND LOOK AHEAD. 

Start with the engineering student: the recent graduate of an 
academic program in high school who has completed four 
years of English, four years of mathematics, two years of 
physical sciences, history and social studies, and a foreign 
language — one who has really studied to stay in the top 
quarter of his class — what happens to him as an under- 
graduate in engineering at the University of Maryland? 

As a freshman, he and all engineering students take the 
same courses — elementary mathematical analysis, general 
chemistry, engineering graphics, introductory mechanics, com- 
position and American literature, physical education, and (for 
men) air science. Already the broad pattern of engineer- 
ing education and its five major elements stand out. They 
are as follows: (1) basic sciences including mathematics, 
chemistry, physics; (2) engineering sciences including me- 
chanics of solids and fluids, engineering materials, thermo- 
dynamics, electricity and magnetism; (3) liberal arts and 
social studies; (4) professional studies in his major field of 
engineering — which form the backbone of his junior and 
senior years' work; and (5) other required subjects such as 
physical activities and air science. 

By the end of the first year the engineering student will 
choose his major department. At Maryland this is one of six 
leading to the degree Bachelor of Science — in Aeronautical 
Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Elec- 
trical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, or Fire Protec- 
tion. The programs are arranged so that one can complete 
the requirements for the bachelor's degree in any one of 
these fields in four academic years; and the students who for 
one reason or another find themselves in difficulty as fresh- 
men or sophomores can usually get themselves straightened 
out during the summer terms following the freshman or 
sophomore years. The somewhat better than average engineer- 
ing freshman can expect to graduate in four years; and those 
"in mid-field" in one additional year if they really apply 
themselves. 

Engineering students, who as juniors and seniors rank in 
the upper quarter of their classes and show promise of 
creativity and leadership in engineering and the engineering 
sciences or in teaching and research, should plan to do gradu- 
ate work in engineering. Graduate work leads to degrees 



The boundary layer flow on a helicopter fuselage, made 
visual by using a fluorescent oil technique and illuminated 
with an ultra-violet light. 



of master of science and doctor of philosophy with a major 
in one of the engineering departments and a minor usually in 
one of the related sciences or management. There is an acute 
shortage of engineers with earned doctor's degrees — and 
there are challenging opportunities for able men with such 
top-level preparation. However, whether at bachelor's, or 
master's, or doctor's level, education for engineering la\s a 
broad base for continued learning after college, be it in pro- 
fessional practice, in business or industry, in public service 
or in teaching and research. 



B, 



'UT LETS GET BACK TO THE ENGINEERING FRESHMAN AND 

follow him quickly from his first days on campus to his junior 
year when he should be solidly established in his major de- 
partment. 

Each entering student at the University is invited to spend 
two days on the campus during the summer preceding his 
registration to acquaint himself with the campus, the 
libraries and the college in which he will enroll. In engi- 
neering, the entering student attends lectures by Associate 
Dean Allen of the College of Engineering and his assistants 
— men who help the student complete his registration for 
the first semester and introduce him to life and work on 
campus as a first year student in engineering. 




The first two years of an engineering curriculum at Mary- 
land are almost the same for all departments. Engineering 
sciences represent the interdisciplinary subjects so important 
to all engineers; and each engineering student, from the time 
he enrolls in his first engineering science course, is in per- 
sonal contact with at least one engineering teacher to whom 
he can turn for counsel and guidance. A team of advisers 
responsible to the Associate Dean of Engineering stand by 
for such help as may be required. It is important to main- 
tain the broad-based program in engineering for the first two 
years so that graduates of accredited junior colleges and 
high-quality academic programs elsewhere can transfer to 
engineering at the University at the close of their sophomore 
year. Sometimes this means that in effecting a transfer a 
student must spend an eight weeks' summer session in transi- 
tion to attain junior standing at the University. Returns on 
a student's investment in this kind of summer program 
between the end of the sophomore year elsewhere and the 
beginning of his junior year in engineering at Maryland are 
indeed significant. 

By means of live closed-circuit television every freshman 
student in engineering comes in contact with the ablest and 




most experienced teachers from his very first day on campus. 
As a part of organized instruction, these lectures are followed 
by problem work and class discussion in small groups by 
instructors who clarify and extend the lectures, and help 
the student learn new subject matter and ways of engineering 

An engineer has many tools of communication and com- 
putation — by words, by pictures, and by symbols. He learns 
the pictorial or graphic language in his first course in engi- 
neering: here he learns to communicate by means of sketches 
and diagrams. Also as part of this first course he learns to 
use a slide rule in arriving at numerical answers to prob- 
lems with an engineering flavor. Somewhat later he works 
on more sophisticated problems and learns to use digital 
computers and to program problems for modern computers 
in business, industry, and public service. But let me empha- 
size that he learns to do these things from the point of view 
of a thinking, planning, and reasoning engineer — not that 
of a technician. We understand that the University of Mary- 
land is one of the first schools to make use of closed-circuit 
television with intercommunication in engineering subjects: 
and one of the first to have its own digital computer that is 
compatible with the largest and most sophisticated com- 
puters in use today — one of which is now in the Computer 
Science Center, whose director is also a member of the 
faculty of the College of Engineering. 

Learning to be an engineer involves active learning which 
is something different from passively being taught. Accord- 
ingly the engineering students learn from one another outside 
of class as well as in the classroom. The engineering and 
physical sciences library is readily accessible to every engi- 
neering student. There are student chapters of the major 
professional societies — and at Maryland there are six: The 
American Society of Civil Engineers. The American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers, The American Institute of Chemi- 
cal Engineers, Institute o( Electrical and Hlectronics Engi- 
neers, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 
and the Society of Fire Protection Engineers. Each of these 
student chapters of professional societies has its own group 
of elected officers and a faculty advisor representing the 
major department, as well (usually) as contact members 
from State or regional chapters of the national society. 

There are also at the University of Maryland the follow- 
ing honor societies for which high ranking upper classmen are 
eligible for election: Tau Beta Pi (the Phi Beta Kappa ot 
Engineering) which includes all branches o\ engineering, 
Maryland's chapter o( Tau Beta Pi has the unique record 
of having been chosen twice in consecutive years the out- 
standing chapter among 1 10 chapters oi this national society 
— and it was awarded an honorable mention the third 
and fourth years. Chi Epsilon is the national civil engineer- 
ing honor society; Eta Kappa Nu, the national electrical 



November-December, 1963 



engineering honor society: Pi Tau Sigma, the national me- 
chanical engineering honor society. These societies, along with 
the student chapters of the professional societies each year 
carrv on many worthwhile student activities. One of these 
activities is the annual Open House which is held each Febru- 
ary as a part of National Engineers' Week. This open house 
involves planning, organization, and effective presentation 
of what students do and where they work. Open House has 
guided tours which have attracted upwards of five or six 
hundred visitors irrespective of weather. We consider these 
extra-curricular activities sponsored by students and their 
faculty advisers to be an important part of each participant's 
education to become an engineer. 

Is THIS EFFORT WORTHWHILE? CAN THE "AVERAGE" 

engineering freshman make it if he really tries? Yes, without 
question! And if he has that combination of ability, per- 
sonality, sincerity, and real dedication to his work and his 
team he will have opportunities for further learning and 
service in professional practice as an engineer in industry, 
public service, private practice, or in teaching and research. 
So let's see what kind of work Maryland's engineering gradu- 
ates do. Here are just a few examples: Aeronautical Engi- 
neers deal with problems of transporting people and things 
by air and through space; with aero-space sciences and their 
engineering applications to aircraft, rockets, and missiles and 
to their control in flight. . . Chemical Engineers develop 
and produce industrial chemicals, fuels, modern synthetics 
and other engineering materials. They apply thermodynamics, 
reaction kinetics, and nuclear science to design and operation 



in the chemical industries. . . Civil Engineers are planners, 
builders and managers of public works and private enter- 
prises. They play major roles in designing, building and 
managing industrial plants, public works, bridges, dams, water 
supplies, transportation facilities, large buildings. . . Electri- 
cal Engineers apply mathematics and physical sciences in 
the design of systems to generate and distribute electrical 
energy, to transmit and receive 'intelligence' — by telephone, 
radio, television, computers — and to automate industrial 
processes for industrial plants and often serve as industrial 
agents, managers, or sales representatives. . . Graduates in 
Fire Protection are concerned with scientific and technical 
problems of preventing loss of life and property by fire, ex- 
plosion, and related hazards; and they serve industry, public 
agencies, and insurance companies professionally. . . The 
Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
does fundamental research in theoretical and experimental 
fluid dynamics and in the application of mathematics to a 
vast area of science and engineering. . . The Wind Tunnel 
Operations conducts a program of experimental research 
and development in cooperation with the aircraft industry, 
agencies of government, and other industries with problems 
concerning aerodynamics. . . The Fire Service Extension 
provides in-service training for volunteer municipal, and 
industrial firemen; and serves in an advisory capacity in 
matters of fire prevention, fire protection, and fire safety 
regulations. . . The Engineering and Physical Sciences 
Library, which supplements the general University Library, 
is in the north wing of the Mathematics Building. This library 
has a reading room on the first floor and three decks of book 
stacks with a capacity of over 100,000 volumes. 




Mr. Robert C. Byrus, 

Director, Fire Service 

Extension. 



Professor Charles T. G. Looney, Civil 
Engineering. 



Professor C. A. Shreeve, Jr., 

Mechanical Engineering. 






Professor Monroe H. Martin, Director, Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 



Professor 
A. Wiley 

Sherwood, 
Aeronautical 
Engineering. 





PROI I ss(i!< ROBI i< I H 
Hi < KM \N\. ( lirnil, ,;/ / fl- 

ginet > 



PROI ESSOR How \kd I 

I omi'kins. / !<■< /;•/'< (// En- 
gineering. 




Professor John L. Bryan, Fire Pro- 
tection. 




Mr. Donald S. Gross, Director, Wind Tunnel Operations. 





Mr. Gordon O. Allen, Engineering and Physical Science* 
Librarian. 



w 




HAT ABOUT THE FUTURE OF TOMORROWS ENGINEERS? 

Remember — these are the engineering graduates of today. 
Graduates of 1963 will be at the peak of their careers at the 
beginning of the Twenty-first Century; and more and more 
of them will have had graduate training than did yesterday's 
engineers. Last summer our Nation's largest brokerage firm 
predicted a "tremendous U. S. surge within two decades." 
Maryland's engineers of today will be helping to push along 
all these advancements. 

But we hear the cry of professional obsolescence in this 
rapidly changing world. Can engineering graduates of today 
continue to be at the front? Must they continually be going 
"'back to school"? Yes; and no! Professional advancement 
or obsolescence in engineering is the natural consequence 
of an attitude of mind and gumption — or lack of it. Profes- 
sional, technical, and scientific societies hold meetings, spon- 
sor lectures, publish papers, and provide countless 
opportunities for committee service. Their publications are 
available to members at a small charge, and they are on file 
in many libraries. Yet many graduates — and many employers 
— seem to think that teaching stagnates and obsolescence takes 
over unless the course that each individual wants at a given 
moment is offered for credit, after hours, in his own building 
by one of his colleagues (or a University professor) at little 
or no cost or effort to himself. . . . 

Maryland, along with most first-rate engineering schools, 
avoids narrowly specialized curriculums. Fundamental 
knowledge is stressed; and the techniques are postponed 
until the student is on the job. Techniques change con- 
tinually, but fundamentals remain the same. An editorial 
in a leading newspaper last summer noted that Russian engi- 
neering students today study in some 200 specialized cur- 
riculums, compared to about 20 in the U.S. (Maryland has 
still fewer.) The editor pointed out that a young man in 
the Soviet Union does not major in the broad field of elec- 
trical engineering, but rather in a narrower division such as 
"Electrical Transport" or "Lighting Engineering and Princi- 
ples". A Russian engineer, trained in narrow specialized 
fields, probably would have difficulty in shifting to another 
field if his job became obsolete. An American engineer, with 
his broad, fundamental technical background, should easily 
be able to make whatever changes may be necessary as tech- 
nology and science advance. 

It's obvious then that a good engineer never can stop learn- 
ing. To be a leader today — or tomorrow — he must continually 
study and find new and better ways to do things. Every 
forward-looking engineer does just that, whether he was gradu- 
ated 50 years ago or last June. 

For example, Charles M. White was graduated from Mary- 
land in 1913 with a degree in mechanical engineering. He 
was the only mechanical engineering graduate that year; and 
the entire engineering graduating class numbered only nine 
men. The engineering curriculum then, as now, was based 
on science, mathematics, and humanities, although some 
courses differed considerably from today's courses. Twenty- 
two-year-old Charles wrote a thesis titled "Some Engineering 
Data". . . . Lack of space does not permit me to tell how 
Mr. White grew from his first job as a mill-wright helper to 
become chairman of the board of one of the Nation's largest 
steel companies and one of America's most influential and 
highly-respected industrialists. 

Thirty years later, in 1943, Henry W. Price, Jr. was gradu- 
ated at Maryland in Electrical Engineering in a class of 76 
engineers. His curriculum was based on many of the same 
subjects as Mr. White's; but they had been changed to meet 
the needs of World War II. He studied "engineering data"; 
but it was not the same as that of a student of 1913. The 
curricula of the 1940's for all their individual differences 
from those of earlier years, had yet a certain sameness in 
basic pattern that had not changed much in many years. After 
a term with the Merchant Marine, Henry returned to the 
University of Maryland to begin his graduate work in prepara- 
tion for an academic career. He now is Associate Professor 



8 



the Maryland Magazine 




Professor Henry W. Price, 

'43. 





Mr. Daniel P. Boyd, '63. 



Dr. Charles M. White, '13. 



of Electrical Engineering, and the chief adviser to under- 
graduate students in Maryland's largest engineering depart- 
ment. 

Another twenty years passes: Daniel P. Boyd was gradu- 
ated from Maryland in Chemical engineering with the class 
of 1963 which numbered 229 young men and women. The 
curriculum of the 1960's that Dan Boyd studied differed from 
the other two mentioned above; but it still was based on the 
same fundamentals. He realized that engineers need more 
and more formal education. Since he wants to enter the 
field of research, he is enrolled for graduate work; and he 
plans to continue at the University of Maryland until he 
completes his doctor's degree. 

These men, over a span of 50 years, have studied engi- 
neering subjects based on common fundamentals. They 
completed curricula which were in step with the best in engi- 
neering schools anywhere. The graduate of 1913 became one 
of our Nation's top leaders by formal graduate work, further 
self-study, and the gumption which develops top men in 
industry by way of engineering. The 1963 graduate aims 
to complete his graduate work — including research — before 
he sets his course for the more distant future. The 1943 
graduate is "in the middle" — in the main-stream of profes- 
sional service as a distinguished engineer and teacher whose 
formal learning is active; whose consulting service is in keen 
demand; and whose dedication to developing undergraduate 
and graduate students in engineering is the backbone of front- 
line engineering education looking toward the twenty-first 
century. The University of Maryland can be proud of the 
engineers of whom these three are so representative. 

But don't get the notion that engineering doesn't change 
at Maryland — or at any leading University — merely because 
you do not read constantly of "firsts" or "news" in the public 
press. Marylanders will recognize a difference between an 
oyster bed and an ant-hill — and they will realize it takes 
time and proper environment to grow things of real value. 
There is no need for sensationalism in engineering. Facilities 
for instruction and research change; faculties change; attitudes 
change; opportunities change; responsibilities change ... we 
think for the better! A look at the Maryland campus and 
engineering facilities will show superficially where we stand 
today; but a look into the classroom, laboratory, library, 



and student's study rooms show more. If everyone isn*t 
running around (as ants in an ant-hill) it does not mean 
that learning is not being developed — fundamental knowledge 
and capacity to use it as engineers in the Twenty-first Century. 



W, 



HAT ARE OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENGINEERS TODAY? If YOU 

want to see the picture right around home, drive around the 
Baltimore-Washington area and note names on the fronts 
of industrial buildings. In 1960, the Board of Trade of Metro- 
politan Washington listed 144 Research and Development 
Companies in this area which provided jobs for 20.000. Look 
at the list and count how many were not even in existence 
ten years ago; and how many develop products even un- 
heard of ten years ago. Remember that engineers who are 
heading some of these modern industries today were formally 
educated by way of college curriculums that were in effect 
15 or 20 years ago. in. say. the I940's. . . . 

How can one prepare himself to be ready for other new 
and challenging opportunities as an engineer? Let me stress 
again, that such an engineer must always continue to learn. 
He must first learn the fundamentals of engineering; and 
then he must always continue learning the rest of his active 
life. This does not mean continuing to "take courses" for 
credit! Anyone who has learned to study can continue to 
read, study, and learn on his own — and he must never let 
habits of active learning lapse if he wants to be in the best 
market for his professional services today — or tomorrow. 

Tomorrow's engineers who will combine science and man- 
agement with engineering — who will conceive and design 
goods and services that people want and arc willing to pay 
for — will never be without stimulating and challenging work. 
Tomorrow's engineers who are preparing themselves today, 
have professional opportunities the like of which no one has 
yet seen. 

Yet tomorrow's engineers will do many oi the same kinds 
of things engineers of today and yesterday have done — and 
they will find better ways to do them. Moreover thej will 
do things we have not yet dreamed of! The future of the 
engineering profession could not be in better hands than in 
the hands of tomorrow's engineers! p^> 



November-December, J 963 



Mr. Charles A. Chaney, II. 





Mr. W. F. Clark, '59. 



Maryland Engineering Alumi 



D, 



ID YOU KNOW THAT ROCKVILLE, 

Maryland, in nearby Montgomery 
County, has twice been named All- 
America City of the year by Look 
Magazine and the National Municipal 
League? It was so designated in 1954 
and again in 1961. 

Rockville has a population of 33,000, 
sixty of whom are engineering gradu- 
ates of the University of Maryland. 
This is one Maryland engineering 
graduate to each 550 persons in the 
community; and if there were no other 
engineers in that area it would be about 
the national average distribution of 
engineers. 

Here, right around home, we thought, 
is a ready-made laboratory to find out 
something about a sample of Mary- 
land's engineering alumni: who they 
are; where they live and work; what 
they do — at work and otherwise; and 



how they helped to make Rockville an 
All-America City — twice. So we set off 
for Rockville, carrying along the alumni 
list. 

We headed first for City Hall to inter- 
view William F. Clark '59 who is the 
Assistant to the Director of Public 
Works. Bill said that he is helping tc 
develop Rockville's six-year capital-im- 
provements program; and he showed us 
the model for the Mid-City Urban Re- 
newal Project. He explained that since 
many industries are located in the area 
surrounding Rockville, many persons 
choose to live there. Consequently, over 
the past ten years, Rockville has been 
the fastest growing municipality in the 
State. 

Armed with a map, we set off to ex- 
plore the city and visit others on our 
list. Down the street, we found J. Ward 
Wisner, Jr., '23 in the midst of moving 



from the house in which he had lived 
for almost 40 years to a new one in the 
suburbs. He now has retired from 
teaching in Rockville's High School. 

George W. Edmunds '52 was busy 
designing flow meters for the Engineer- 
ing Physics Company. Sharing the same 
building was the Thomas M. Yoder Co., 
Inc., General Contractors. There we 
found R. F. Simi '56 and William 
Moore '63. They were working on 
plans for a bomb shelter for Rockville. 

Allan Morton Thomas, Jr. '35 is 
President of A. Morton Thomas and 
Associates, Inc. He and his company 
have been instrumental in helping to de- 
velop many of Rockville's improve- 
ments. 

Since Charles A. Chaney had gradu- 
ated in 1911, we thought he might be 
leading a leisurely life and we could 
interview him at his attractive home in 



10 



the Maryland Magazine 



Mr. George W. Edmunds, '52. 





Mr. Bruce H. Burnside, '44. 



an All -America City 



the outskirts of Rockville. We were 
wrong; so we headed for the office of 
C. A. Chaney & Associates, Marina 
Consultants, where we found him work- 
ing on the design for his 510th marina. 
He began designing marinas in the mid- 
1930's and, since then, he has desigred 
most of the important marinas in the 
United States, plus five in South Ameri- 
ca, two in Europe, one in South Africa, 
and two in Australia. He has written 
five books on marina planning. He is 
regarded as the nation's authority on 
that subject. 

P. F. Barry '59 and R. R. Locke '60 
work for the IBM Corporation. John 
Pavlides '56 and C. M. Stretmater III 
'59 are structural engineers. E. R. Ruck- 
er '50 is a zone manager for the Clay- 
ton Manufacturing Company. 

We also visited the beautiful Civic 
Center which is the hub of Rockville's 



many recreational, cultural, and social 
activities. We wondered how many 
Maryland engineers contribute to these 
organizations. By continuing our inter- 
views, we found that Maryland's Engi- 
neers who live in Rockville are active 
in community affairs and the list of their 
hobbies is a long one. For example. 
J. C. Tomasello '56, a project leader at 
the Harry Diamond Laboratories, is 
President-elect of a local civic associa- 
tion and a delegate to the County Civic 
Federation. Others were active with 
churches, the P.T.A., scouting, profes- 
sional societies, the Toastmaster Club, 
and lodges. 

Golf and fishing tied for first place as 
favorite recreations of the groups, with 
home carpentering second. Other 
favorites were bowling, hunting, soft- 
ball, gardening, photography, camping, 
art, music, politics, and barbershop-sing- 



ing. B. H. Burnside '44 v\ho is a mem- 
ber of a team that tests atomic sub- 
marines, is an officer of the Potomac 
Appalachian Trial Club. As an o\er- 
seer of the Club, his specific responsi- 
bility is to supervise and assist in the 
maintenance of a six-mile stretch o\ the 
trail near Rockville. 

Much more could be said in this re- 
port of Maryland's Engineering Alumni 
in Rockville. If you were to go to 
Baltimore, or Philadelphia, or Cleve- 
land, or New York . . . you would find 
the makings of other stories of Mary- 
land's engineers in professional practice, 
industry, business, public service, teach- 
ing, research . . . and you would fin J 
that there are more opportunities for 
good engineers than there are men and 
women prepared to fill them 7>& 



November-December, 1963 



II 



W. FAYETTE ST. 



\N. BALTIMORE ST. 




W. REDWOOD ST. 



W. LOMBARD ST. 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 



A New Professional Campus 
Takes Shape in Baltimore 



A CAMPUS THAT REALLY LOOKS LIKE A CAMPUS IS BEGIN- 
ning to evolve in Baltimore. The sight of open spaces 
and the promise of grass and trees and new buildings 
are lifting everyone's spirits. 

A four-acre tract of newly cleared ground west and south 
of the Baltimore Union on Lombard Street — the University's 
Urban Renewal Project One — is being prepared for planting, 
parking lots, and courts for tennis and handball. Handsome 
brick walls are rising to enclose a central courtyard. 

The landscaping, which will be completed in January 1964, 
is only the first phase of Project One. There are plans for a 
future gymnasium and swimming pool here. 

Meanwhile, demolition is almost 95 percent complete in the 
nine-acre Project Two at the north edge of the campus. As 
many as four cranes at a time worked, sometimes around 
the clock, to accomplish this. The old Biltmore Hotel has 
gone, to make way for the new law building complex, for 
which ground will be broken around the first of the year. 

The few buildings awaiting destruction have a doomed look 
among the ruins. Al's Restaurant is still there, visited daily 
by a few faithful partons, and temporary quarters next door 
for the University's purchasing and personnel departments 
have been spared, awaiting completion of their new offices in 
Howard Hall. 

The open spaces lend stature to University Hospital and 
the buildings around it and reveal the beauty of historic old 
Westminster Church and its graveyard, where Edgar Allan 
Poe is buried. Motorists on the Baltimore-Washington Park- 
way on Greene and Paca Streets can no longer pass by the 
campus without seeing it. 



Cleared areas in this project will ultimately provide sites 
for a new hospital building, new dental building, and quarters 
for house officers and graduate students, as well as the new 
law buildings. Adequate off-street parking will be included, 
according to Urban Renewal regulations. 

Project Two acreage also includes properties that the Uni- 
versity acquired in 1959 by purchase from the Hecht Com- 
pany. 



J ohn Eager Howard Hall, with its new brick facing 
and beautiful new lobby on Redwood Street, doesn't even 
faintly resemble the old department store that it used to be. 
and nobody ever thinks of it as that any more. Renova- 
tion is substantially complete in the six-story Hall. 

One of the first departments to move in was the Medical 
School's new Institute of International Medicine, founded in 
1960 to train medical researchers here and abroad and to 
conduct research in international health problems. The Insti- 
tute's new laboratories are located on the fifth floor, and 
eventually a computer center will be added there. 

Other new occupants are the Medical School's basic science 
departments — biochemistry, biophysics, microbiology, path- 
ology and clinical pathology, pharmacology, and physiology — 
which occupy three and a half floors. These departments hail 
been scattered throughout the campus in crowded and out- 
dated quarters in the old Medical Technology Building and 
Gray Laboratory, as well as the newer Bressler Research 
Building (built in 1940). where the space freed was badly 
needed for expansion of other medical research. 



by Beth Wilson, Associate Director of University Relations 



November-December, 1963 



13 



Dr. George Entwisle and Dr. Paul Richardson confer 
in Al's Restaurant before the cranes move in. 





On the sixth floor a modern new animal farm is being in- 
stalled and an award of bid has been made for construction 
of a new radiobiology unit. 

With the more than seven acres of added floor space that 
Howard Hall provides, medical students now have more 
classrooms and all students studying basic sciences, under- 
graduates, as well as graduates, have been assigned individual 
laboratory areas where they can work around the clock if they 
wish. Eventually, Howard Hall will provide space for several 
central administrative offices and campus maintenance 
services. 

Costs of remodeling and fixed equipment were about $2.75 
million, including Federal funds. 

Across the street from Howard Hall, at the corner of 
Redwood and Penn Streets, the former department store's 
335-car parking garage, now University Garage, is doing 
something to ease the campus's acute parking shortage. Next 
door to the garage, a former service building has been re- 
modeled; one floor of this building, renamed Redwood Hall, 
is being used temporarily by the University's two-year-old 
School of Social Work (which enrollment jumped 50 percent 
this year), and the other three floors are being used to store 
campus supplies. When the new law buildings are completed 
the School of Social Work will move to the present law 
building. 

Renovation is continuous in University Hospital, built in 
1934, and in the connecting Psychiatric Institute, added in 
1953 with a junctional wing to the main hospital. 



A larger and greatly improved cobalt machine, called a 
Theratron, has just been installed as one treatment unit in the 
newly remodeled radiation wing of the Hopital. Another form 
of radiation therapy will be initiated here when the Nation's 
most powerful betatron to be used for anticancer treament 
goes into operation next spring. The betatron, installed last 
March, is being tuned up electronically and calibrated for 
use in cancer research and for the treatment of deep-seated 
tumors in such areas as the bladder, lung, esophagus, and 
pelvis. 

A 14-bed inpatient unit for child psychiatric patients has 
been in operation for nearly two years; a ten-bed clinical re- 
search unit for fundamental studies of disease in man, opened 
last year, is now in full operation. 

Other modernization includes adaptation of the ninth floor 
in the hospital for neurological patients, who require in- 
tensive care; expansion of the newborn nursery on the sixth 
floor, the physical therapy department on the eighth, and the 
kitchen and cafeteria on the basement and first floor; 
modernization of all ten operating rooms on the seventh 
floor; conversion of the twelfth floor from house staff quar- 
ters to a 53-bed unit for patent care; and the addition of an 
elevator. 

The Hospital has plans for complete renovation, floor by 
floor. Besides the other floors mentioned, the tenth floor, for 
private patients, has been partially remodeled, and the eleventh 
floor will soon be modernized. 

A pilot unit for research on the metabolic and biochemical 



14 



the Maryland Magazine 



,t the height of demolition, 
altimore faculty referred to 
leir campus 
>s "the disaster area." 




#arc/er £ D'crsc, 



vret/i-ccrf 



aspects of shock has been installed on the fourth floor, and 
future plans call for construction of an entire wing of the 
Hospital devoted to the study and treatment of patients in 
shock. 



r our new University buildings on Lombard Street, 
all built within the past six years, have done much to im- 
prove the campus: Dunning Hall, the pharmacy school build- 
ing; Whitehurst Hall, the nursing school building; the Balti- 
more Union; and the three-year-old Health Sciences Library, 
across the street from 151-year-old Davidge Hall (which has 
recently been refurbished with fresh paint, new floors, and 
new steps). 

Next door to the new Baltimore Union, the original Uni- 
versity Hospital, parts of it built in 1823, still serves as the 
outpatient department in spite of its deteriorated condition. 
Plans call for its being replaced by an eight-story building, 
which will also provide 100 additional patient beds. 

Ultimately, expansion to 13 stories is contemplated, to 
provide more outpatient services and more hospital beds. 
Long range plans contemplate a total of about 1,200 beds, 
to meet growing demands of the city and State. 

The Medical School must expand its educational program 
to fill the urgent need for more physicians; in 1962 the fresh- 
man class was enlarged from 100 to 128. Expanded hospital 



November-December, 1963 



services, besides meeting essential community needs, will also 
provide clinical experience for more medical students. 

When the pesent outpatient building is razed, the Baltimore 
Union will be enlarged on this site to triple its present housing 
capacity of 195. 

In January, g/ound will be broken near the corner of Paca 
and Fayette Streets for a group of three new buildings to 
replace the present law building, built in 1931. One building 
will house the law library, with initial stack space for 80.000 
volumes; another will provide administrative offices and 
classrooms for the Law School: and the third will be a 600- 
seat auditorium for use by all schools on the campus. As 
soon as these new buildings are available the present law 
building will be turned over to the School of Social Work. 

Dental school enrollment is also growing, and plans are 
being drawn up this year for a new denial building to provide 
for new research facilities, new special clinical areas for 
graduate and postgraduate studies, larger laboratories for the 
basic sciences, and a training school for dental hygienists 
and other auxiliary personnel. Meanwhile. 40 new dental 
chair units have been installed to modernize the present 
dental school clinic. Along with the building plans, the 
dental school is also engaged in revaluation of its curriculum. 

New buildings and new equipment greatly increase campus 
electrical needs, and the initial phase of a master switching 
station is being designed, to be located underground, between 
the A and B wings of the Hospital. £^ 



15 



3,715 Alumni contribute $116,235 
to the Greater University Fund 



T 



HE GREATER UNIVERSITY FUND HAS 

mailed to alumni The Annual Report 
and list of contributors for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1963. 

Hailing the '63 program as the most 
fruitful to date, Chairman Albert E. 
Goldstein, M. D., and National Canvass 
Chairman Howard Filbert, Engineering, 
stated: 

"This is the way that we as alumni 
join hands with the faculty and students 
in making a greater University. As 
alumni, our help in the enrichment of 
our libraries, in student aid and in the 
Distinguished Faculty Program gives us 
an active part in the continuous ad- 
vancement of higher education at the 
University of Maryland. 

"We know that fund volunteers from 
all over the country share with us the satis- 
faction that comes from active partici- 
pation in this program. We hope each 
one of you will want to be part of the 
'64 Program by serving as a Sponsor 
for the Fund. It is a vital and worth- 
while service." 

During the '63 season the number of 
contributors reached a record high of 
3,715. The total amount contributed 
was $116,235. 

The total contributions to the Fund 
have exceeded $805,000. 

"Since 1958," said Mr. Filbert, 
"alumni of the University of Maryland 
on 18,168 occasions have reached into 
their own pockets to say, 'We believe in 
the University of Maryland, and we 
want to help. It is not what we can 
get out of the University that is import- 
ant but what we can put into it.' This is 
the spirit we need, and this is the spirit 
of thousands of our graduates. It is one 
of the greatest assets of the University." 

Subsequent to the issuance of the an- 
nual Financial Report, the Fund organ- 
ization compiled a "Round-up of Sample 
Projects Sponsored in whole or in part 
by the Fund" during the past five years. 
This list follows: 



For Outstanding Students 

MORE THAN $155,000 HAS BEEN USED 
IN THE STUDENT AID PROGRAM AND 
OVER 400 STUDENTS HAVE BEEN 
HELPED SO FAR. 

At least one scholarship for each school 
and college, under alumni auspices; 

Special named scholarships for many of 
the schools and colleges of the Uni- 
versity; 

Special student aid and loan programs 
for Nursing, Law, Pharmacy, Engi- 
neering, Art, Music, Agriculture and 
Medicine; 

Annual Art students awards; 

Two new emergency loan funds; 

Annual prize for scholarship in the field 
of Mathematics; 

Annual prize for excellence in Surgery; 
and a 

Fellowship program in Agronomy. 



For Outstanding Faculty 

MORE THAN $150,000 HAS BEEN USED 
IN THE FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PRO- 
GRAM. 

University-wide Outstanding Teaching 
Awards program; 

New Visiting Professors program; 

Distinguished lecture series in Radi- 
ology; 

Distinguished lecture series for the Law 
School; 

Television teaching apparatus for Den- 
tistry; 

Special research funds in Pharmacology; 

Funds for advanced study for Engineer- 
ing faculty members to secure their 
doctorate; and 

Research funds for advanced study in 
heart surgery and cardiology. 



For Outstanding Libraries 

MORE THAN $45,000 HAS BEEN USED FOR 
ENRICHMENT OF THE LIBRARIES. 

Many special collections of practical 
and historic interest acquired for li- 
braries on both campuses; 

Outstanding German music collection 
acquired; 

Special fund for medical libraries; 
Class of '62 gift for special library col- 
lections; 

Class of '63 gift for library use; and a 
Special collection of Civil War docu- 
ments and papers of prominent Balti- 
more political figure secured. 



For Environment for 
Outstanding Work 

MORE THAN $450,000 HAS BEEN USED 
IN THESE AND OTHER SIMILAR PRO- 
GRAMS. 

Furnished the Baltimore Union, a major 
addition to the Baltimore Campus; 

A new Comparative Literature Journal 
sponsored; 

Sent University Chapel Choir to Inter- 
national Music Festival and to Car- 
negie Hall; 

Support for projects in the University 
Theater; 

Special recitals and concerts; 

Programs of the University's Madrigal 
Singers sponsored; 

Funds for helping to establish the new 
Betatron Unit for cancer research; 

Assistance in establishing a Metabolic 
Research Clinic in the Hospital; 

Renovating project at historic Ross- 
borough Inn: and 

Support for individual projects in many 
of the schools and colleges. 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 




HOMECOMING 



SEVERAL THOUSAND ALUMNI RETURNED TO COLLEGE 
Park in the traditional football week-end. More than 
500 alumni enjoyed an informal buffet luncheon in 
the main dining hall. 

Following the game, a sellout in which the Terrapins lost 
to the Nittany Lions of Penn state, 17-15, alumni were enter- 
tained at a coffee hour in the ballroom of the Student Union. 
President and Mrs. Wilson H. Elkins were on hand to greet 
the several hundred persons present, and members of the 
Prince Georges Alumni Club, with Dr. John Cronin as Presi- 
dent, served as hosts. 

"Maryland Hits the Books" was the theme of this year's 
Homecoming festivities. Price-winning floats were: fraternity, 
first place, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, "The Gladiators," second 
place, Zeta Beta Tau, "Breakfast at Nittany's" or "Cat on a 
Hot Tin Pan"; and dormitory, first place, Belair, "Gone With 
the Wind," and second place, Calvert C and D, "How the 
Rest Was Won." 

House decoration winners, judged earlier, were: dormitory, 
first place, Dorchester, "Rally Round the Goal, Terps," 
second place, Carroll, "Matchbook — Maryland Strikes Again"; 
sororities, first place, Sigma Kappa, "A Farewell to Nittany," 
second place, Sigma Delta Tau, "Nittness for the Prosecution," 

While the band played "I Enjoy Being a Girl," Homecom- 
ing Queen candidates were escorted onto the field by mem- 
bers of the Pershing Rifles. Ingrid Uldrikis of Carroll Hall 
was crowned Homecoming Queen of 1963 by President Elkins 
and was presented a bauquet of roses by Dr. Edward Stone, 
president of the Alumni Association. Assisting were Jim 
Beattie, president of S.G.A.; Carol Gebert, overall Home- 
coming chairman; and Kathy Walsh, Baltimore campus 
Homecoming Queen. 

First Queen runnerup was Judy Cohen, Alpha Epsilon Phi; 
second, Terry Etienne, Kappa Kappa Gamma; third, Pat 
Missel, Alpha Chi Omega; and fourth, Bridgette Forshew, 
Delta Gamma. 

The Queen and her court and the prize-winning floats rode 
in parade at halftime, and the Maryland band presented 
"Maryland Victory Through the Ages." 

Billy May's Orchestra furnished music for the dance in the 
evening, which was attended by approximately 2,400 persons. 
The theme, "Hitting the Books" was carried out in the dance 
decorations, which featured a giant crepe paper mug filled 
with rulers and pencils. Vocalists for the evening were 
the Coasters. Jim Beattie recrowned Queen Ingrid and pre- 
sented her with a silver tray. 




November-December, 1963 



17 




DECEMBER 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 
JANUARY 



20 Christmas Recess Begins After 
Last Class 

27 Basketball, Evansville, Indiana, 

Away 

28 Basketball, Evansville, Indiana, 

Away 



6 Christmas Recess Ends 

9 S.G.A. Cultural Committee, 

National Symphony 
1 1 Basketball, Navy, Away 
13 Basketball, North Carolina, 

Away 
16 Band Concert 



18 Basketball, North Carolina 

State, Away 
20 Basketball, Wake Forest, Away 
2 1 Pre-Examination Study Day 
24-29 Semester Examinations 

FEBRUARY 

3 Spring Semester Registration 



Faculty, Students, Citizens 
are Honored By the University 



University of Maryland awards for 
excellence in teaching, the first ever 
given, were presented to five faculty 
members at the Third Annual Honors 
Convocation. Each of the faculty mem- 
bers received an award of $1,000. 

Also honored at the Convocation 
were 354 academically superior students 
and three Maryland citizens who have 
exemplified the ideals of the Univer- 
sity. 

Recipients of the teaching awards, 
all assistant professors, were Dr. Gor- 
don Atkinson, Department of Chem- 
istry, Dr. Norton T. Dodge, Depart- 
ment of Economics, Dr. David M. 
Farquhar, Department of History, Dr. 
John Portz, Department of English, 
and Dr. Edgar P. Young, Department 
of Animal Science. 

In announcing the awards, Vice Pres- 
ident for Academic Affairs R. Lee 
Hornbake said: 

"The University of Maryland's basic 
purpose in granting this award is to 
search out and reward excellence in 
teaching, with specific attention given 
to our young faculty members. 

"The selection procedure acknow- 
ledges the differences among the dis- 



ciplines and places emphasis upon 
creative, resourceful approaches to 
teaching," Dr. Hornbake concluded. 

Dr. Atkinson, 33, a native of Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. holds degrees from Lehigh 
University and Iowa State College. Be- 
fore coming to the University of Mary- 
land in 1961, he was a member of the 
faculty at the University of Michigan. 

At Maryland, Dr. Atkinson teaches 
freshman and sophomore chemistry as 
well as upper division courses. In ad- 
dition, he is the advisor of two under- 
graduate National Science Foundation 
Follows, four graduate students and 
four post-doctoral fellows from India, 
Japan, England and Italy. His interest 
in teaching extends also to the secon- 
dary school level where he has partici- 
pated in judging high school science 
fairs. 

Dr. Dodge, 36. who holds degrees 
from Cornell and Harvard Univerities, 
is a native of Oklahoma City. Before 
coming to the University of Maryland 
in 1956, he was a member of the 
faculties of the University of Vermont 
and Wellesley College. 

An expert on economics in the 
Soviet Union resulting from extensive 



research and personal visits to the 
USSR, Dr. Dodge teaches both under- 
graduate and graduate level courses. 
He initiated and organized the first 
graduate level program in economics 
of the Soviet Union to be offered at the 
University and is currently assisting in 
the planning of an interdepartmental 
curriculum in Soviet studies. A prolific 
writer, Dr. Dodge serves as a consultant 
on Soviet affairs for a number of gov- 
ernmental agencies. 

Dr. Farquhar, 36, is a native of 
Silver Spring. He holds degrees from 
the University of Washington and 
Harvard Universities. He is a graduate 
of Montgomery Hills Junior High and 
Montgomery Blair High Schools and 
attended Georgetown University. Dr. 
Farquhar, who is an expert in Chinese, 
Japanese, Mongolian and European 
languages, was instrumental in develop- 
ing the area of Far Eastern studies at 
the University of Maryland which has 
attracted a large number of students. 

Dr. Portz, 49, was born in Pottsville, 
Pa. He holds degrees from Duke and 
Harvard Universities. Before coming 
to the University of Maryland in 1947, 
he was a member of Northwestern 
University faculty. 

He teaches basic freshmen and 
sophomore courses and upper division 
courses in English, and American 
literature. In addition to his academic 
work at College Park, Dr. Portz taught 



18 



the Maryland Magazine 



courses in modern literature to high 
school teachers throughout the State of 
Maryland. 

Dr. Young, 35, was born in Van 
Wert County, Ohio. He holds degrees 
in animal science, agricultural eco- 
nomics, physiology and anatomy from 
Ohio State University. A member of 
the faculty at College Park since 1958, 
he teaches animal husbandry to both 
upper and lower division students. He 
serves as advisor to the undergraduate 
majors in his department and to a num- 
ber of student organizations. 

John G. Palfrey, a member of the 
Atomic Energy Commission and a 
former dean of Columbia College, pre- 
sented the principal address: "Govern- 
ment and the Distracted Scholar." 

During the ceremony 354 students 
were cited for achieving an academic 
average during the 1962-63 school year 
of 3.5 or above, out of a possible 4.0 
points. 

President Wilson H. Elkins presented 
Regents' Distinguished Service Awards 
to three individuals who in the opinion 
of the Board of Regents exemplify the 
ideals for which the University of 
Maryland stands. 

They are The Honorable Edward S. 
Delaplaine, of Frederick; Walter N. 
Kirkman, of Baltimore; and James M. 
Cain, of Hyattsville. 

Delaplaine, author and jurist, gradu- 
ated from Washington and Lee Univer- 
sity and studied law at Washington and 
Lee and the University of Maryland. 
He served as a member of the Mary- 
land House of Delegates, from 1916 to 
1918, city attorney of Frederick from 
1919 to 1922, was admitted to practice 
before the Supreme Court in 1932, and 
was Chief Judge of the Sixth Judicial 
Circuit and Associate Judge of the 
Court of Appeals of Maryland from 

1938 to 1957. 

In addition, Delaplaine is the author 
of several books including Roger B. 
Taney: His Career as a Lawyer; The 
Dred Scott Case; and Religious Liberty 
and the Courts. 

Kirkman became associated with the 
State Department of Health in 1910, 
was appointed Secretary and later Chief 
of the Division of Personnel and Ac- 
counts. In 1921 he was appointed State 
Purchasing Agent in addition to his 
duties on the Board of Health. From 

1939 to 1948 Kirkman served as State 
Budget Director of the Department of 
Budget and Procurement. 

Kirkman has also served as Director 
of the Maryland Medical and Chirur- 
gical Faculty and as Chairman of the 
sub-committee on policies and financing 
of Maryland's medical and hospital pro- 
grams. In 1961 he was appointed a 
member of the State Board of Health 
and Mental Hygiene. 

Cain, a newspaperman and a na- 
tive of Annapolis, is the author of 
many sketches, novels and plays. He 



has been on the stall ol the Baltimore 
Sunpapers from 1918 to 1923. and 
served as a Professor of Journalism at 
St. John's College for one year. He was 
an editorial writer for the New York 
World from 1924 to 1931. His novels 
include The Postman Always Rings 
Twice; Serenade; Mildred Pierce; Love's 
Lovely Counterfeit; Past all Dishonor; 

and Galatea. 



New Infirmity 



A new student health services facilitj 
has been opened at College Park. 

Located adjacent to the Student 
Union Building here, the new facility 
was constructed at a cost of $455,000 
appropriated by the 1961 Maryland 
General Assembly. 

Modern physicians offices and ex- 
amining rooms, in-patient pantry, x-ray 
facilities, an operating room for minor 



surgery, physical therap) room and 
laboratory facilities are among the new 

services which will be available to stu- 

dents. 

I he new building will provide beds 

for 25 patients on the second Boor 

I he third or attic Root can be utilized 
foi additional bed space in an emer- 
gencj 

I he stall ol three lull lunc and live 

part-time physicians, headed by its 

director. Dr. I ester \1 l)\ke. saw 
25.000 patients during the 1962-63 

academic year, an increase ol 2500 
over the previous year, ["he physicians 

are assisted b) I I nurses, one technician 
and four hospital attendants. 

I he new building will replace the 
old health services building which w.is 

originally built in 1901 and renovated 
in 1940 and 1957. The old building 
is currently being used as a dormitory 

for men. 




Dr. Day named 'Outstanding Young Scientist' 



Dr. Thomas Brannock Day, associate 
professor of physics at the University, 
has been named by the Maryland Acad- 
emy of Sciences as the State's "Out- 
standing Young Scientist of 1963." 

Dr. Day, 3 1 , was cited for his "brilli- 
ant research in high energy physics 
and his significant contributions to the 
theory of elementary particles." 

He received an engraved plaque bear- 
ing the citation and a $500 cash grant. 
The award was presented by Mayor 
Theodore R. McKeldin, of Baltimore, 
a member of the Academy's Board of 
Trustees. 

The Academy also gave special 
honorable mention to two of the seven- 
teen scientists nominated for the award. 
They are Dr. Joseph F. Bird, of the 
Johns Hopkins University, for his "out- 
standing contributions to the under- 
standing of unstable burning of solid- 
fuel propellants" and Dr. James L. 



Gimmick, of Loyola College, for his 
"contributions to science teaching and 
his significant research in physical 
electronics." 

The Outstanding Young Scientist 
Award was established by the Maryland 
Academy of Sciences in 1959 to help 
stimulate the interest of young people 
in science and to recognize their efforts. 

Dr. Day's selection was made by a 
committee of three judges who evalu- 
ated the achievements of the nominees. 

The judges were Dr. Ralph D. 
Bennett, vice president. Nuclear Divi- 
sion, Martin Company; Dr. Alvin 
Nason. professor of biology and asso- 
ciate director, McCollum Pratt Institute. 
Johns Hopkins University and Dr. John 
W. Townscnd. assistant director. Godd- 
ard Space Flight Center. National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Greenbelt, Md. 

Dr. Day, who lives at 10600 Pine- 



Nov ember-December, 1963 



19 



Ja'e Drive, Silver Spring, received his 
B.S. in 1952 from the University of 
Notre Dame and his Ph.D. in 1957 
from Cornell University. At the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, he engaged in both 
theoretical and experimental research 
in high-energy physics. 

His principle theoretical investigation, 
conducted at Cornell and Maryland, 
demonstrates that certain elementary 
negatively-charged particles which come 
to rest in matter interact with this 
matter in only a limited number of 
ways. This discovery means that the 
possible explanation for observed phe- 
nomena is reduced to a manageable 
number and this theoretical work is, 
therefore, a powerful tool for experi- 
mental research on elementary particles. 

Recently, Dr. Day participated in an 
experiment that demonstrated a sim- 
ilarity between two different elementary 
particles — the sigma and lambda 
hyperons which are particles having 
respective masses about 2300 and 2200 
times as heavy as an electron. This 
result lends support to recent theoret- 



ical efforts to understand elementary 
particles and their interactions. 

Another experiment which examined 
the decay or break-up of sigma hy- 
perons made it clear that a major 
research effort would be required if 
the picture of these decays is to be 
completely understood. In addition to 
these theoretical and experimental 
efforts, Dr. Day has been a leader in 
developing new methods in the use 
of high speed computers for the analy- 
sis of high energy physics experiments. 

He has written numerous technical 
articles and reports, and has published 
in such journals as the Physics Review, 
the Journal of Applied Physics and the 
Bulletin of the American Physical 
Society. 

Dr. Day is the University of Mary- 
land representative on the Southern 
Regional Accelerator Committee, Oak 
Ridge National Laboratory; chairman 
of the committee's subcommittee on 
high energy physics, and is a represent- 
ative at Argonne User's Group, 
Argonne National Laboratory. 



Some Recent Grants to the University 



For continued research in surgery. 
The Pangborn Foundation to De- 
partment of Surgery 
$6,000. 
* 

For a continued program of research 
and training. 

General Electric Foundation to 
Department of Physics and Astron- 
omy 
$5,000. 
* 

For research on the organic chemistry 

of high polymers. 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company 

to Department of Chemistry 

$10,000. 

* 

For research on the operating efficiency 
of firms marketing agricultural prod- 
ucts. 

U. S. Department of Agriculture 
to Department of Agricultural 
Economics 
$10,000. 
* 

To support studies concerning the anal- 
ysis residues of Chemagro experimen- 
tals in plant and animal tissues. 
The Chemagro Corporation to De- 
partment of Entomology 
$2,000. 
* 

To provide funds for a counseling and 
guidance training institute. 
U. S. Office of Education to Col- 
lege of Education 
$20,216. 



For graduate research and study. 
General Electric Foundation to 
Department of Physics 

$5,000. 

For studies on lysin requirements of 
starting chicks. 

Merck & Company, Inc. to Depart- 
ment of Poultry 
$3,000. 

For computer-oriented research in the 

space related sciences. 

National Aeronautics and Space 

Administration to Computer 

Science Center 

$700,000. 

For research on the dynamics of astro- 
physical plasmas. 

National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration to Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics 
$97,622. 

For study of agricultural education in 

the United States. 

Carnegie Corporation of New York 

to University 

$200,000. 

To expand the master's program in gen- 
eral psychiatric nursing and in develop- 
ing the newly-established master's pro- 
gram in child psychiatry nursing. 
National Institute of Mental 
Health to School of Nursing 
$1,579,661. 




1895-1919 

Dr. Andrew Loughnan, m.d. '01, 
of Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, died on 
October 4, 1962. He was 89. 

Dr. Robert E. Booker, m.d. '02, of 
Lottburg, Virginia, died on March 25, 
1963. 

Dr. Andrew Colin Gillis, m.d. 
'04, died of a heart attack at Mercy 
Hospital in Baltimore on March 12, 
1963. Dr. Gillis was an internationally- 
known psychiatrist and neurologist. He 
was 83. 

Mrs. Page Edmunds (Millicent 
Geare), Nurs. '05, died on January 31, 
1963, following a carriage accident, 
while vacationing in Nassau, British 
West Indies. 

S. Bradford Downes, Pharm. '06, 
died on March 6, 1963, at the age of 
82. 

Dr. James Herbert Bates, m.d. '07, 
died at his home in Elkton, Maryland, 
on March 21, 1963. Dr. Bates practiced 
medicine in Elkton for more than 40 
years. He was 78. 

Dr. Harry M. Robinson, m.d. '09, 
died at the age of 78 in March, 1963, 
at Mercy Hospital in Baltimore. He had 
been ill for some time. Dr. Robinson 
was professor emeritus of dermatology 
at the University of Maryland Medical 
School. 

Dr. William E. Martin, m.d. '09, 
is in the general practice of medicine. 
He lives in Randallstown, Maryland. 
Dr. Martin has one son. 

Major General 
Lindsay McDonald Silvester 

Major General Lindsay McDonald 
Silvester of Washington, D. C, a 1911 
honor graduate of the Maryland Agri- 
cultural College, died recently at the age 
of 73. Burial was in the Fort Myer 
Chapel, Arlington, Virginia. 

A native of Portsmouth, Virginia, 
General Silvester began his military 
career soon after college. When he re- 
tired in 1949, he was a veteran of 38 
years, including service in the 1916 
Mexican Punitive Expedition and both 
World Wars. 

He was awarded the Distinguished 
Service Cross for gallantry in action 
during World War I, as well as the 
Silver Star, Purple Heart and the French 
Croix de Guerre. 

During World War II, General Sil- 
vester trained armored units and was 
given command of the "Lucky Seventh" 



20 



the Maryland Magazine 




Among principals at the 13th annual M Club Awards Banquet on December 7 
at the Statler-Hilton Hotel in Washington, D.C. were the Honorable J. Millard 
Tawes, Governor of Maryland, and Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of the Uni- 
versity, pictured with the three newest members of the Maryland State Athletic 
Hall of Fame (holding framed certificates), and M Clubbers. Left to right. John 
D. Poole, banquet chairman: C. Robert Boucher, M Club President; William M. 
Werber, batting star of the 1940 World Series while playing with the champion 
Cincinnati Reds; "Dutch" Lentz, triple-threat athlete who enjoyed a distinguished 
career in football, basketball and baseball in the early 1900's; Governor Tawes; 
Dr. Elkins; and Robert "Bobby" Pool, lacrosse player and one-time coach at 
Harvard University. Some 600 persons filled the Statlcr's Presidential Ballroom 
to witness the award presentations. At the same time, Governor Tawes was made 
an honorary member of the M Club. 



Armored Division when it spearheaded 
General Patton's dash across France and 
liberated many French towns. 

General Silvester was past president 
of the Izaak Walton League in Bethesda 
and the University of Maryland "M" 
Club. 

Survivors include his wife, Mildred 
Turner Silvester, Washington, D. C; 
two sons, Colonel Lindsay M. Silvester, 
U.S.A.F., stationed in California, and 
Edward M. Silvester of Falls Church, 
Virginia; and five grandchildren. 

Dr. William P. Mahoney, d.d.s. 
'12, of Millbrook, New York, has been 
President of the Board of Education, 
The Community Center, The Dutchess 
County Dental Society, and Chairman 
of the Boy Scout Committee. He is also 
a bank director, and a church trustee. 

Dr. Paul N. Fleming, m.d. '13, has 
been in Otolaryngology since 1914. In 
addition he is a 32nd Degree Mason, 
and an active member of many Medical 
Societies. Dr. Fleming resides in Silver 
Spring. 

Dr. Theodore H. Morrison, m.d. 
'15, of Baltimore, was formerly clinical 
professor of Gastro-Enterology at the 
University. He continues practice, and 
is a member of numerous boards, in- 
cluding the American Board of Internal 
Medicine, 
cine. 

Bernard F. Senart, Engr. '17, is 
now retired in Sarasota, Florida. He 
was an aeronautical engineer with the 
Air Materiel Command, U.S.A.F., from 
1920-1951. 

1920-1929 

Cornelius D. Hogan, d.d.s. '29, of 



Burlington, N. J. is in private Dental 
practice, and also is Senior Dentist at 
the N. J. State Prison at Trenton. He 
holds membership in a number of Den- 
tal Societies, including the American 
Dental Assn. He is a Medical Advisor 
of the Local Draft Board. He is a 
member of Psi Omega Fraternity, the 
Elks and the Knights of Columbus. 

(Mrs.) Sophie Nordenholz Thau, 
ll.b. '29, has a private law practice, 
been president of the Woman's Bar 
Ass'n of Baltimore, and Founder of 
Mates of Baltimore Yacht Club. 

Hon. R. Dorsey Watkins, ll.b. '25, 
is United States District Judge for the 
District of Maryland. His long and 
distinguished legal career has been in 
Baltimore where he served as President, 
The Bar Association. Memberships in 
Honor Societies include Phi Beta 
Kappa, ODK, and The Order of the 
Coif. 

Dr. Nicholas N. Briclia, m.d. '25, 
of Philadelphia, has had a general prac- 
tice in this area since graduation. 

Dr. Irving Topchick, ph.g. '25 and 
m.d. '27, was previously a Hospital 
Pharmacist. He is now a retail Phar- 
macist in Brooklyn, New York. 

Robert D. Blackistone, A&S, '26. 
is the owner of the Plaza Hotel in 
Washington, D. C. He has been Direc- 
tor of The Hotel Association in Wash- 
ington, and of The First National Bank 
of St. Mary's in Leonardtown. He is 
also a member of The Board of Trus- 
tees of Charlotte Hall Military Acad- 
emy and on the School Board in St. 
Mary's County. 

Dr. Charles W. Edmonds, m.d. '26. 
is in the General Practice of Medicine 
in Towson. He is a member of the 



Medical .mil ( birurgical Facultj >>i the 
State ol Maryland, I Ik- KM \ and a 
member ol Boumi I emple. 

Ki nm iii I Sim \( i . I ngr, '27. is 
Director ol 1 ngineering Roofing (ir.m- 
ule Division ol I lie Ruberoid ( om- 
pany, with headquarters in Hagerstown. 
He is Directoi ol the \ M< V and a 
member ol the Optimist ( lub 

Nh kon B. (Mike) Stevens, I du 
'27, is a Patent Attorney, played pro- 
fessional ball, was a ( aptain ol Ord- 
nance in World War II. and served .is 
Alumni President tor Sigma Nil I i.i 
ternity. He has also been Vice Presi- 
dent of the University's "M" Club, and 

resides in Bethesda. 

Dr. Byruth Lenson-Lambros, m.d. 

'27. is in both private practice and 
Industrial Medicine in Baltimore. She 
is a member of the Women's Medical 
Society and also the American Medical 
Women's Association. 

Dr. Mark Wi i sh. m.d. '28, is now 
retired as a member of the Maryland 
Live Stock Sanitary Service. He was 
also Director of the Animal Industry 
Division for Lederle Laboratory, now 
with the American Cyanamid Com- 
pany. He and his wife Claribel, also a 
graduate of the University, live at "In- 
dian Purchase" at Secretary. Maryland. 

1930-1939 

Curry N. England (Mrs. Harri- 
son), Edu. '30, of Rockville, Maryland, 
previously taught Home Economics in 
Montgomery County and was As-,'i 
Prof, of Home Management at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. She has been 
President of several Women's Clubs, 
and of her fraternity Kappa Kappa 
Gamma. 

Joseph J. Smith, m.d. "30. is Chief 
of the Dept. of Internal Medicine of 
Bridgeport Hospital, at Bridgeport. 
Conn, where he resides. He is a Diplo- 
mate of the American Board of Internal 
Medicine, Dir. of Health at Easton. 
Conn., and Pres. of the Connecticut 
State Heart Assn. 

Florence C. McLeod, A&S '30. of 
Alexandria. Va.. also holds a B.S. degree 
from Simmons College. Boston. This 
is in the field of Library Science and 
was received in 1937. Her present posi- 
tion is as an Education Specialist. U. S. 
Navy Training Publications Center. 
She previously was Librarian. Chil- 
dren's Dept., Public Library of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia. She holds the rank 
of Lieutenant in the USNR. She has 
had texts published basic to Navy cor- 
respondence courses, namely Financial 
Management in the Navy, and Elec- 
tronics Administration and Supply. 

C. E. MARGESON, D.D.S. '31. of Balti- 
more, is currently practicing Dentistry. 
He holds memberships in a number of 
Dental Societies, and had the rank o\ 
Captain in the Armed Forces. 

WALTER Kohn, m.d. '31. of Balti- 
more, is a practicing physician, and was 



November-December, 1963 



21 




David L. Brigham, former Director of the Office of Alumni 
Relations, was honored "for a job exceptionally well-done" 
at a dinner November 1 at the Emerson Hotel. Among the 



more than 400 persons attending were Governor J. Millard 
Tawes and State Comptroller Louis Goldstein. 



a Lt. Commander, MC, USNR. He be- 
longs to Phi Lambda Kappa Medical 
Fraternity, the Baltimore City Medical 
Soc, and is on the Faculty of Mary- 
land University in the Medical & Chi- 
rurgical Dept. His paper on Fetal Can- 
didiasis was published in the Maryland 
State Medical Journal of 1954. He is a 
32nd degree Mason, and a Shriner. 

David E. Wells, A&S '31, who re- 
sides in College Park, has also received 
a degree in Law from formerly Na- 
tional University (now George Wash- 
ington) in 1934. He was a Special 
Agent with the FBI, and is now a Part- 
ner in the Fuel Business of G. T. Wells 
& Sons, and is a member of several 
civic clubs including the Hyattsville 
Lions Club. 

Stephen I. Rosenthal, m.d. '32, of 
Scranton, Pa. is a practicing physician, 
and belongs to various medical socie- 
ties. He attained the rank of Major in 
the Army from 1942-1946. 

Ben Goodkin, d.d.s. '32, of Lincoln 
Park, N. J. is a practicing Dentist. He 
has held positions of Dentist with the 
State Dept. of Health. The Lincoln 
Park School and the Board of Child 
Welfare. He holds memberships in The 
American Dental Assn., N. J. Dental 
Assn. and others. He has been Dir. of 
Barnet Temple YMHA, and is a mem- 
ber of Kiwanis. 

Frederick E. Beachley, ll.b. '32, 
of Wash., D. C, practices Law. He was 
formerly a member of the Maryland 
General Assembly, Maryland State In- 
come Tax Atty., U. S. Civil Service 
Comm. Atty., and D. C. Gov't. Legal 
Auditor. He was admitted to the Court 
of Appeals, Md. in 1934, the Tax Court 



of U. S. in 1941. He is a member of 
B.P.O. Elks. 

Ralph B. Garrison, m.d. '33, of 
Hamlet, N. C. is a practicing physician. 
He has been a Dir. of Hamlet Savings 
Loan and Southern National Bank. He 
has been a member of the N. C. State 
Med. Soc. Executive Council; Past Pres. 
of N. C. Academy General Practice and 
the Executive Board of NCAGP, the 
Lions Club, and Rich. Co. Med. So- 
ciety. 

Filbert LeRoy Moore, d.d.s. '33, 
of Towson, Maryland, is specializing in 
the Orthodontics field. He held the rank 
of Lt. Col. with the Army. He is a mem- 
ber of the Baltimore City and Mary- 
land State Dental Societies, is on the 
Board of Presbyterian Hospital, and is 
a member of the Optimist Club of 
Baltimore, the Masons, and is a Shriner. 

Harvey F. Connick, A&S '33, re- 
sides in Louisville, Ky. and is presently 
Supervisor, E. I. DuPont Co., Neoprene 
Synthetic Rubber. Formerly he was 
Supt. of Smokeless Gun Powder Mfg. 
during World War II at E. I. DuPont 
de Nemours Co. He is a member of 
Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity and the 
American Chemical Society. 

A. E. Penn, ll.b. '34 is president of 
the Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. Prior 
to receiving his Law degree from the 
University of Maryland, he attended 
the Baltimore College of Commerce in 
1928 and received his CPA in 1930. 
He belongs to numerous clubs, and is a 
member of Doric Lodge AF&AM, 
Beauseant Commandery, and also the 
Baltimore Royal Arch Chapter No. 40, 
Boumi Temple. 

Catherine Dennis Thomason, H. 



Ec. '34, has been teaching in the Win- 
netka, Illinois Public Schools and for 
the past two years she has been direct- 
ing the Learning Laboratory for Junior 
High Schools, which she initiated, and 
which has become very successful. She 
is moving back to Baltimore, where her 
husband has accepted a new position. 

Robert F. Healey, m.d. '34 of 
Baltimore, is a practicing surgeon. He 
is on the attending staffs of St. Agnes 
& Bon Secours Hospitals. He is a 
member of the American College of 
Surgeons, the Medical Chir. Faculty of 
Maryland, the American Medical As- 
sociation, and belongs to Phi Delta 
Theta, Omicron Delta Kappa and Phi 
Chi Fraternities. 

Dr. Ferdinand Fader, m.d. '35 of 
East Orange, New Jersey is a practicing 
physician. 

Henry Karl T. Schaaf, A&S '35 of 
Catonsville, Maryland is at present 
treasurer of Schaaf, Inc. He previously 
was assistant foreman in the X-ray 
Division of Westinghouse Electric Com- 
pany. He served as an E. T. Mate 2nd 
Class for 19 months in the Armed 
Forces. He is a member of the Ma- 
sonic Order-Sincerity Lodge No. 181. 

Maurice Skoblow, d d.s. '35 of 
Tenafly, New Jersey is a praticing 
dentist. 

Dr. Conrad L. Richter, Pharm. '36 
of Baltimore, is the medical director of 
Martin, Inc. He also holds member- 
ship in the Baltimore Medical Society, 
the Med. & Chir. Faculty, and the 
American Medical Association. 

Dr. O. G. Klotz, d.d.s. '36 of Glou- 
cester, New Jersey has a general prac- 
tice in dentistry. He served in the 



22 



the Maryland Magazine 



armed forces from 1943-1946 and holds 
the rank of Lt. Cmdr. USNR. He was 
on the Board of Education of Glou- 
cester City for eight years, is past 
president of the Lions Club, and is 
active in many social and civic organi- 
zations. He has been director of the 
Terrapin Club of the U. of M. 

William Stanton, A&S '36, Ph.D. 
'41. of Westfield, New Jersey, is a 
chemist laboratory director for Dupont 
Co. at Darlin, New Jersey. He is a 
member of the American Chemist So- 
ciety, the Society of Motion Pictures 
and Television Engineers, Society of 
Photography Scientist & Engineers, and 
the American Institute of Chemists. 

Dr. Lewis H. Shipman, d.d.s., '36 
of Worcester, Massachusetts is a prac- 
ticing orthodontist. He attained the rank 
of captain in military service from 1942 
to 1946. He is president of the Wor- 
cester District Dental Society; a staff 
member of Worcester City Hospital, 
president of the Greendale Kiwanis 
Club, and secretary to the Worcester 
District Dental Society. He is also a 
32nd Degree Mason. He has had sev- 
eral papers published on dentistry. 

Amiel Kirshbaum, Agr. '37, of 
Bethesda, Maryland, is the chief of the 
Control Testing Branch of the Division 
of Antibiotics at the U. S. Food & 
Drug Administration. He holds the 
rank of major in the U. S. Army, and 
was in service from 1940-1946. He is 
a member of the Society of American 
Bacteriologists, and has had numerous 
scientific papers relating to antibiotics 
published. 

Harold L. Kelly, Jr., Engr. '37 of 
Hyattsville, Maryland is maintenance 
superintendent of the physical plant of 
the University of Maryland. Previously 
he was a colonel in the U. S. Army; a 
structural engineer of the Public Build- 
ing Administration in Washington, D. 
C, surveyor and construction engineer 
for J. E. Greiner Co. Consulting Engi- 
neers of Baltimore and assistant on the 
Engineer Corps of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad. 

F. Rowland McGinity, Pharm. '37, 
of Baltimore, is the owner of a phar- 
macy. He was formerly an instructor 
at University of Maryland. 

Donald H. Williams, Agr. '38, now 
resides in Kensington, Maryland. He is 
presently technical director of Dairy 
Industries Supply Association. He was 
previously employed as dairy technolo- 
gist, International Association of Ice 
Cream Manufacturers, dairy Technolo- 
gist at the Bureau of Dairy Industry, 
USDA. He holds the rank of Lt. Col., 
USMC (Ret.), and served actively in 
the armed forces from 1941-1946. He 
holds memberships in the Institute of 
Food Technologists, American Dairy 
Science Association, International Asso- 
ciation of Milk & Food Sanitarians, is 
a Fellow of the American Association 
of Adv. Science. He is also a member 



of Cosmos Club oi Washington, I) ( 

He has had about 35 papers and articles 
published. 
Dr. Theodore Woodw uu>, m.d., '38 

is a practicing physician ol Baltimore. 
He formerly held the position of pro- 
fessor and head of the department ol 
Medicine at the University ol Man- 
kind School of Medicine. He reached 
the rank of l.t. Col. in the M ( . during 
the period [941-1946. He holds mem- 
berships in a number of medical organi- 
zations among which are the American 
Medical Association, the American Col- 
lege & Physicians, American Society ol 
Clinical Investigation and the American 
Board of Internal Medicine. He has 
had one monograph ami numerous 
papers published. 

Dr. Joseph M. George, Jr., m.d. 
'38 is now residing in Las Vegas. Ne- 
vada. He is a practicing physician. He 
was a flight surgeon from 1942-1945 
and attained the rank of major in the 
Army Air Corps. He carries mem- 
berships in the American Medical 
Association, Nevada State Medical As- 
sociation, the American Academy of 
General Practice of which he is a past 
president. He also belongs to the Ki- 
wanis Club, the Elks and the Veterans 
of Foreign Wars for which he served 
as past state commander and national 
surgeon. He currently serves on the 
Governor's Mental Health Advisory 
Committee. 

Dr. Leonard L. Levin, d.d.s. '38. 
of Norfolk, Virginia is a practicing den- 
tist. He served with the Navy from 
1942-1946 as a dentist. 

Dr. Hans H. Griesbach, d.d.s. '39 
lives in Naugatuck, Connecticut where 
he is practicing dentistry. He is a mem- 
ber of the Waterbury Dental Society, 
the Si Psi Phi Dental Fraternity, and 
the Elks. 

Dr. Herbert Lapinsky, m.d. '39 of 
Brooklyn, New York also received his 
M.S. degree from the University of 
Maryland in 1935. He served in the 
U.S. A. A. F. and reached the rank of 
major. He is a physician in private 
practice. 

John P. Smith, Jr., Engr. '39, of 
Alexandria, Virginia, also studied law at 
the Georgetown University for two 
years. He served in the Seebees during 
World War II and carried the rank of 
Lt. (jg) U.S.N. He is vice president 
of the Charles H. Tompkins Co. He is 
a member of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers, the Washington Board 
of Trade, and The University Club. 

1940-1949 

Fred S. Kefauver, Agr. '40 lives in 
Middletown, Maryland. He is the man- 
ager of Plumbing & Heating Sales of 
the Frederick Trading Co. He is a 
major in the U.S.A.R., having had 4 J /2 
years active duty in World War II. 

Joseph Levin, BPA '41 is living in 




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Washington, D. C. He also holds an 
LL.B. '49 and an LL.M. '50 from 
George Washington University. He is 
an attorney in private practice. He 
served three years in the armed services 
during World War II. 

Margaret T. Smedley (Mrs. Wm. 
M.) Agr. '41 is a homemaker and the 
wife of Professor W. M. Smedley of 
the U. S. Naval Academy. She is a 
member of the Alpha Xi Delta sorority 
and has held the office of president of 
that organization. 

Howard C. Filbert, Jr., Engr. '41, 
M. Engr. '48, M.S. '53 is a resident of 
Baltimore. He is executive vice presi- 
dent and general manager of Miller Re- 
search Laboratories, and formerly held 
the position of chief of the Engineering 
Division of NOL at White Oak, Mary- 
land. He is a member of the American 
Rocket Society, having been a director 
and past president of the Maryland 
Chapter. He also holds memberships 
in the American Ordnance Asso- 
ciation, National Society of Professional 
Engineers and Registered Professional 
Engineers of Maryland. He belongs to 
Tau Beta Pi, ODK, Phi Kappa Phi and 
Sigma Tau Fraternities. 

Donald C. Hennick, Educ, '41 of 
College Park, Maryland has retired. He 
formerly held positions of assistant pro- 
fessor of Mechanical Engineering at the 
University of Maryland; lab. assistant 
with the U. S. Bureau of Public Works 
and Maryland State Roads Commis- 
sioners, estimator and draftsman for 
Contractor, Supervisor of N. J. A., and 
assistant to mechanical engineer on con- 
struction work. He was a corporal with 
the Armed Forces from 1918 to 1919. 
He is a member of the American Asso- 
ciation of University Professors and the 
Washington Society of Engineers. He 
belongs to Phi Delta Kappa — B Ep 
Campus Chapter, past president and co- 
ordinator of Iota Lamda Sigma — Nu 
Chapter. He is an historian of the 
American Legion, and a Mason and 
Shriner. 

Dr. James G. Stegmaier, A&S '39, 
M.D. '42 is living in Cumberland, 
Maryland and is practicing surgeon. He 
is a member of the American Medical 
Association and the Allegany-Garrett 
County Medical Society; a Fellow of 
the American College of Surgeons; and 
a member of the Southeastern Surgical 
Congress, among others. He is a mem- 
ber of the BPOE. He is co-author of 
Benign Tumors of the Esophagus. 

Dr. Wallace H. Sadowsky, m.d. '42 
of Havre de Grace, Maryland is a 
practicing general surgeon. He was a 
Lt. (M.C.) and is in the U.S.N. R. He 
was in active service from 1943-46. He 
holds memberships in the Medical & 
Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, the 
Harford County Medical Society, the 
American Association of Railway Sur- 
geons, the American Medical Associa- 
tion, and is a Fellow in the American 



24 



the Maryland Magazine 



College of Surgeons. 
Theodore J. Stei.i 



A&S '42 is now 



living in Denver, Colorado. He is an 
agent with the Connecticut General 
Life Insurance Company. He previous- 
ly was production manager of K.OA- 
TV, with Public Relations, City & 
County of Denver, and senior field 
project planner of The Martin Co. He 
is a major in the AF Reserves, having 
served actively from 1942-45 and Aug. 
1951-Oct. 1953. He was past state com- 
mander of the Air Force Association, 
Colorado Wing, and a member of the 
Junior Chamber of Commerce of Den- 
ver. He has been active in the Ameri- 
can Legion Post, and is a member of 
the Reserve Officer's Association, and 
Civitan International. He was a dele- 
gate to National Defense Strategy Semi- 
nar, Wash.. D. C. in 1961. 

Dr. Lewis C. Toomey, d.d.s. '42 of 
Silver Spring, Maryland is currently an 
orthodontist. Besides his degree from 
Maryland, he studied orthodontics at 
the University of Montreal. Previously 
he practiced general dentistry, and was 
an assistant professor at the University 
of Maryland Dental School. He served 
in the Dental Corps of the Armed Serv- 
ices from 1942-1946. He has been presi- 
dent of the Alumni Association of the 
University of Maryland Dental School, 
past president of the Southern Mary- 
land Dental Society, and is a member of 
Psi Omega Fraternity and OKU Honor- 
ary Fraternity. He is also a member of 
the Kiwanis Club of Silver Spring. 

Kenneth A. Richer, A&S '43 re- 
sides in Baltimore, and is currently an 
electronic scientist-chief. Radiation & 
Propagation Section, Ballistic Research 
Labs, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Mary- 
land. He was formerly a radio engineer 
with Bendix Radio Corporation and the 
same with the Naval Research Labora- 
tory. From 1944-1945 he was an En- 
sign in the USNR. He is a member of 
the American Ordnance Association, a 
past president of the PTA and the 
local improvement associations. He is 
very active in his church. He has had 
numerous technical reports published on 
Ballistic Research Labs. 

Dr. Paul B. Foxman, d.d.s. '43, of 
Bridgeport, Connecticut is a practicing 
dentist. He holds the rank of Lt. Col., 
having served in the Army from 1943- 
1946 and again from 1950-1953. He 
is a member of the Gorgas Odontologi- 
cal Society, the American Dental Asso- 
ciation, Bridgeport Dental Association 
and the Connecticut Dental Associa- 
tion. 

Mrs. Patricia Hazel, Educ, '43, 
supervisor for Army Service Clubs in 
U. S. Army, Europe, at Heidelberg. 
Germany, formerly served as club di- 
rector for Army Special Services in 
Korea from 1956-59, and personnel di- 
rector, Hecht Co., Silver Spring. 

Merton B. Lilly, ll.b. '43, has 
been appointed assistant director of The 

November-December, 1963 




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Washington 1. D. C. NAtional 8-6478 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

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Dow Chemical Company's Patent De- 
partment. He holds his A.B. degree 
from Oberlin College, and also attended 
George Washington University, and was 
in the U. S. Chemical Warfare Service, 
after which he earned his degree from 
Maryland. He has been a patent solici- 
tor for Western Electric, supervisor of 
the Patent Department of Battelle Me- 
morial Institute, a patent attorney for 
a private firm in Toledo, and director 
of the Wyandotte Chemical Corporation 
Patent Department. He joined Dow in 
1955 as a patent attorney and became 
staff counsel in 1957. 

Dr. C. V. Latimer, Jr., M.D. '43 is 
living in Hudson Falls, New York. He 
is a general practitioner, having served 
in the armed forces for two years and 
carried the rank of first lieutenant. 

John F. Miller, BPA '43 of Balti- 
more, is president of Dulany-Vernay 
Inc. Printing Co. He served as a cap- 
tain in the Armed Forces from 1943- 
1946. He is a Mason. 

Lloyd Eugene Church, d.d.s. '44, 
of Bethesda, Maryland is practicing oral 
surgery, and is affiliated with the Subur- 
ban and Montgomery County General 
Hospitals. Besides his degree from the 
University of Maryland, he has an A.B. 
degree from West Virginia University, 
an M.S. and a Ph.D. degree from The 
George Washington University. He 
served in the Dental Corps from 1946- 
1948 as a captain. He has served on 
many committees, including the Presi- 
dent's Committee on Employment of 
the Physically Handicapped from 1961- 
1964 and the International Society for 
Rehabilitation of the Disabled (United 
States Committee), 1962-1964. He be- 
longs to several alumni associations, and 
was sponsor of the University of Mary- 
land Alumni, 1958-59. He is a mem- 
ber of some 17 professional societies, 
including the American Dental Asso- 
ciation. Sigma Xi is his honorary so- 
ciety, and he is listed in "Who's Who," 
plus other directories. He has had six 
papers published, and has given many 
professional talks. 

Dr. George C. Rasch, Jr., A&S '45, 
M.D., '47, of Munster, Indiana, is a sur- 
geon in private practice. He was a 
captain, M.C., U.S.A. from 1954-1956. 
He is a Fellow of the American College 
of Surgeons and a Diplomate of the 
American Board of Surgery. Delta Sig- 
ma Phi is his fraternity. Several of his 
medical papers have been published. 

Ruth Lingle Rasch, Jr. (Mrs. 
George C.) H.Ec. '45, of Munster, In- 
diana, is a homemaker, and a member 
of Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. 

Dr. Joel C. Fink, m.d. '47, of 
Smithtown, New York, also holds a 
B.S. degree from the University of Ala- 
bama. He has a private practice in 
dermatology. He reached the rank of 
major in the Medical Corps from 1943 
to 1954. He is a Fellow in both the 
American Medical Association and the 



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26 



the Maryland Magazine 



Academy of Dermatology & Syphilogy. 
He is a member of several dermatology 
societies, and a consultant of dermato- 
logy at many hosiptals in N. Y. He also 
belongs to the Association of Military 
Dermatologists. 

William R. Lewis, Engr. '49, of 
Riverdale, Maryland is a principal copy 
preparer for Offset Lithography. He 
was an aviation cadet with the Navy 
from 1943-1945. 

Dr. John E. Parent, d.d.s. '49, who 
now lives in North Miami Beach, Flor- 
ida, is a dentist in general practice. He 
was a Lieutenant with the U.S.N, from 
1943-1945 and from 1949-1955. He 
was the president of the No. Dade 
Dental Society in 1959, 1960, and 1961. 

Charles W. Martin, BPA '49, has 
recently been named manager of life, 
accident and health lines at The Travel- 
ers Insurance Companies of Washing- 
ton, D. C. Joining the company in 1950 
as a field supervisor in Washington, he 
was promoted to assistant manager in 
1952; manager at the Erie, Pennsylvania 
office in 1955, and manager of the 
Central City office in Philadelphia in 
1960. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees 
from the University of Maryland. 

1950-1959 

Maj. Thomas M. McKee, Agr. '50 
of East Meadow, New York is serving 
with the USAF. A member of Phi 
Kappa Phi Fraternity, he is also a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Columbus. 

Anna S. Mills, M. Ed. '50 is a 
resident of Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
She is currently a teacher of social stud- 
ies and guidance counselor of the Mar- 
tinsburg Senior High School. Her for- 
mer positions were teacher and acting 
principal of Bunker Hill High School, 
West Virginia and teacher of Bruns- 
wick High School, Maryland. She is 
a member of the National Education 
Association, National Council for the 
Social Studies and others. Her sorority 
is Delta Kappa Gamma. 

Lt. Col. John J. Mayer, d.d.s. '50 
is attending a course at the U. S. Army 
Command and General Staff College at 
Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Col. Mayer 
has been in the Army since 1943. He 
also holds a B.S. degree from The 
Citadel, and he is a member of Omi- 
cron Kappa Upsilon Fraternity. 

Dr. Joseph E. O'Malley, m.d. '50 
of Orlando, Florida is a plastic sur- 
geon. He is a member of the Certified 
American Board of Plastic Surgery. 

Roy H. Robertson, BPA '51, is a 
resident of Farmingham Center, Mass- 
achusetts. He is the New England Divi- 
sion sales manager for Johnson & John- 
son First Aid Products. He has served 
with the same firm as territory represen- 
tative. Prior to this, he was territory 
representative for Proctor & Gamble 
Distributing Co. for the Midwest & 
Hawaii. 



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November-December, 1963 



27 








PORCH & TERRACE HAND 

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1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



Ray Krouse, Ed. '5 1 football star, 
and his wife Marjie, recently had a son, 
Raymond Francis. Jr. The Krouses also 
have four girls. 

Bette Davis Levy (Mrs. David), 
Educ, '51, is a housewife. She is a 
member of Phi Sigma Sigma Sorority. 

Dr. R. Gary Roop, Agr. '51 of Adel- 
phi, Maryland also holds a D.V.M. 
from the University of Georgia, and is 
a practicing veterinarian. He is a cap- 
tain in the Army Reserve Veterinary 
Corps, having been on active duty from 
1957-1959, and is presently in the Ac- 
tive Reserve. He is a member of the 
AVMA, the Maryland State Veterinary 
Med. Association, D. C. Academy of 
Veterinary Medicine, D. C. Veterinary 
Med. Association, Association of Mili- 
tary Surgeons. His fraternity is Sigma 
Phi Epsilon. 

Mary Young Varley, A&S '52 lives 
in Rochester, New York, and is a house- 
wife. 

John Stuart Lambert, ll.b. '52, of 
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, also holds a 
B.S. degree from Lehigh University. He 
is presently an arbitration attorney of 
the Bethlehem Steel Co. at Bethlehem, 
Pennsylvania, having previously been a 
management's representative at the 
Bethlehem-Sparrows Point Shipyard. He 
is a member of Delta Upsilon Fra- 
ternity. 

Harold Vernon Jordan, M.S. '52, 
Ph.D. '57, lives in Bethesda, Maryland. 
He is a senior scientist with the U. S. 
Public Health Service. He served with 
the U. S. Army Air Forces as a 1st Lt. 
from 1943-1945. He is a member of 
the American Association for Advanced 
Science, the International Association 
Dental Research, and the American So- 
ciety of Microbiology. He is a member 
of Sigma Xi Fraternity. He has had 
published several articles in the field 
of dental research. 

Milton Herbert Mitchell, Jr., 
BPA '53 of Baltimore is a supervisor of 
employment with Bendix Radio Divi- 
sion, The Bendix Corporation. Previ- 
ously he was assistant personnel director 
of Hoover Electronics Division, the 
Hoover Co., and supervisor of employ- 
ment with Aircraft Armaments, Inc. He 
served as a 1st Lt. with the Armed 
Forces from 1954-1956. He is a mem- 
ber of Personnel Administration Asso- 
ciation, and is on the Curriculum Ad- 
visory Committee of Baltimore Junior 
College. He also belongs to the Bendix 
Radio Management Club. 

Dr. Johnson Soy Long Ling, Ph.D. 
'53, M.D. '62, is residing in Flushing, 
L.I., New York, and has an internship 
in medicine at Roosevelt Hospital, New 
York City. 

William Everett Brooke, A&S '53 
and ll.b. '55 of Beltsville, Maryland 
is a lawyer. 

Victor H. Jungk, Jr., BPA '54 is 
living in Calverton. Beltsville, Mary- 



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28 



the Maryland Magazine 



land. He is sales representative for 
IBM. 

Lorene Ladd Jungk (Mrs. Victor 
Jungk) H.Ec. '54 is a housewife. She 
was vice president of Kappa Kappa 
Gamma Sorority. 

Dr. Theodore E. Evans, m.d. '54, 
residing in Baltimore, Maryland, is in 
the general practice of medicine. He 
was a captain with the U.S.A. R. and 
was in active service from 1955-1957. 
He is a member of the Optimist Club — 
Perry Hall. 

Virginia Lee Franklin, Nurs. '54 
lives in Towson, Maryland. She also 
holds a MN degree from Emory Uni- 
versity. At present she is an instructor 
in surgical nursing at The Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital School of Nursing. Pre- 
viously she was staff and head nurse at 
the University of Maryland Hospital; 
instructor, Neurosurgical Nursing at 
Emory University and instructor, In- 
Service Education, University of Mary- 
land Hosiptal. 

John C. Meggers, Educ. '55, lives 
in Bethesda, Maryland, and is assistant 
manager of the Brightwood Garage. He 
was formerly with the U. S. Army Ord. 
Corps. Aberdeen Proving Ground. He 
carried the rank of SP/3 from 1955- 
1957. He is a member of the American 
Ordnance Association and the National 
Rifle Association. 

Selma M. Brawner. Nurs. Edu. '52, 
M.A. '55, residing in Aurora, Colorado, 
is a psychiatric nursing supervisor at 
Fitzsimons General Hospital, Denver. 
She has been employed in teaching and 
administration in nursing since 1933. 
She is a Lt. Col. in the Army Nurse 
Corps, and has been in that service 
since 1942. She is a member of the 
American Nurses Association and the 
National League for Nursing. 

Frederick O'Neill Mitchell, Agr. 
'55 of Perryman, Maryland, holds a 
position in Food Processing as vice 
president of F. O. Mitchell & Bro., Inc. 
He is a member of the Rotary Club of 
Aberdeen, Maryland. 

Dr. Charles M. Henderson, A&S 
'55 and m.d. '57, resides in Baltimore 
where he is the resident physician in 
neurosurgery at University Hospital. He 
is a captain in the USAF Reserves. He 
holds membership in several fraterni- 
ties, namely, Sigma Chi, Scabbard & 
Blade, Nu Sigma Nu — Medical and 
Alpha Omega Alpha, Medical Hon- 
orary. 

Dr. Martin Jerome Feldman, m.d. 
'55, of Reisterstown, Maryland, is a 
practicing physician in that area. He 
held the rank of T/3 with the Armed 
Forces from 1943-1945. He belongs to 
the Baltimore County Medical Associa- 
tion. 

Lt. Col. Chester J. Chojecki, Mil. 
Sc. '56, is living in Laurel, Maryland. 
He is an army officer and carries the 
rank of Lt. Col. He is a member of 
the U. S. Army Association, the Tech- 




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nical Writers Association of America, 
and the Institute of Industrial Sciences. 

Alexander W. Astin, M.A. A&S 
'56, ph.d. '58, has been advanced from 
research associate to program director 
in the research division of the National 
Merit Scholarship Corporation, where 
he joined the staff in 1960. Before join- 
ing NMSC he was concurrently assist- 
ant chief of the psychology research 
unit of the Veterans Administration 
Hospital in Baltimore, and assistant pro- 
fessor of psychology at the University 
of Maryland. 

Lt. Col. Evarice C. Mire, Jr., 
M.A. '56, maintains residence in Mont- 
gomery, Alabama. He is presently chief, 
Operations Plans Division at Bunker 
Hill AFB, Indiana. He has been in 
military service since 1940 and has been 
a pilot, squadron commander and com- 
mand pilot. He is a member of Phi 
Kappa Phi and Pi Sigma Alpha Fra- 
ternities and also the Knights of Co- 
lumbus, 3rd degree. His thesis was pub- 
lished. 

Donald Beveridge Taylor, Engr. 
'56 of South Bend, Indiana, also holds 
an M.S. from the University of Notre 
Dame. He is a senior engineer in Struc- 
tural Dynamics Analysis at Bendix 
Corporation, Mishawaka Division. He 
is a member of the National Society of 
Professional Engineers. 

John Francis Bianchi, A&S '56, 
ll.b. '59 resides in Yonkers, New York, 
and is associated with the law firm of 
Close, Griffiths, McCarthy & Gaynor in 
White Plains, New York. 

Lt. Col. Charles E. Billinger, 
BPA '57, USAF, (Ret.) has completed 
his teaching credential requirements at 
the University of California and has 
accepted a position on the faculty of 
Norte Vista High School in Riverside, 
California, where they reside. 

Rev. Ned Heeter, A&S '57, curate 
of St. Matthew's Episcopal Chuch in 
Hyattsville, has accepted a call as rector 
of St. Matthew's Church, Sunbury, 
Pennsylvania. Father Heeter has been 
associated with the Hyattsville Church 
since June, 1960. After graduating 
from the University of Maryland he 
was graduated from Berkley Divinity 
School at New Haven, Connecticut. 
While in this area, he served on the 
Diocesan Committee on Ecumenical 
Relations and was a member of the 
Washington Area Council on Alcohol- 
ism. He was chaplain of the Hyatts- 
ville Fire Department. 

Dorothy J. Burdick (Mrs. Martin), 
H.Ec. '57 of K. I. Sawyer AFB, Michi- 
gan, is now doing some substitute teach- 
ing, having taught full time for two 
years previously. She belongs to Alpha 
Gamma Delta Sorority, and also the 
American Association of University 
Women. 

Bozhana J. Trost, A&S '57 lives in 
Washington, D. C, and is assistant ref- 
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30 



the Maryland Magazine 



Department of Justice. 

F. R. Hagan, Jr., A&S '57 of Balti- 
more, is the engineering editor of West- 
inghouse Electric Corporation. He 
joined the Maryland Air-National 
Guard in 1957 and is presently a S/Sgt. 
He holds membership in the Institute 
of Radio Engineers. 

Dr. Robert B. J. Mui.vaney, m.d. 
'58, has recently graduated from the 
School of Law of Fordham University 
at Lincoln Center, New York. He is 
currently serving his legal clerkship 
with the firm of Schopira, Steiner and 
Schopira in Newark. He is also physi- 
cian to the Essex County, New Jersey 
Penitentiary, and chairman of the 
Medical Social Welfare Committee of 
the Essex County, New Jersey Medical 
Society. 

Ellen K. Coale (Mrs. C. W.), 
H.Ec. '58, of Adelphi, Maryland, was 
formerly an administrative dietitian. 

C. W. Coale, Jr., Agr. '59, lives at 
Adelphi, Maryland, and is currently a 
graduate student at the University of 
Maryland. He was with the USNR for 
three years, having the rank of Lt. 

David James Washington, M.Ed. 
'59, of Washington, D. C, is presently 
a high school teacher. He is a member 
of many organizations, including the 
National Education Association. He 
also belongs to PDK and MSTA. 

Harry Wilson Roberts, U.C. '59, 
who resides in Silver Spring, Maryland, 
is a military personnel specialist with 
the U. S. Government. He was for- 
merly an officer in the U. S. Army, 
having attained the rank of Lt. His 
fraternity is Phi Kappa Phi. 

Valerie Regardie, Nurs. '59, M.S. 
'63, is living in Chevy Chase, Maryland. 
She is a registered nurse, and an in- 
structor, School of Nursing. She has 
also been a head nurse and a staff 
nurse. Among the associations she be- 
longs to are the American Nurses Asso- 
ciation, National League for Nursing, 
and others. She belongs to Sigma Theta 
Tau Sorority. Her article "Nursing 
Outlook," was published in 1959. 

Maurine Knatvold Hayter, A&S 
'59, of Baltimore, is working part-time 
at Hutzler's Department Store while 
working on her M.A. degree. Previ- 
ously she worked as secretary and sub- 
stitute teacher at W. Annapolis School; 
a computer, U. S. Navy Experiment 
Station, and in the Book Department at 
Hutzler Store. Her husband, Comdr. 
Huber M. Hayter, USN, was killed in 
action in 1942. She is a member of 
PEO, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Alpha Theta, 
and a former member of AAUW — Pen 
Women and Kappa Beta Pi, legal so- 
rority. Has had an article published in 
SHIPMA TE Magazine. She witnessed 
the attack at Pearl Harbor, and 
christened the USS Hayter. 

Dr. Gerson Asrael, m.d. '59, A&S 
'57, Houston, Texas, is resident in 
urology at Baylor University. 



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November-December, 1963 



31 



Roy Dragone. ll.b. '59, is living in 
Baltimore. He holds a BSCE from Le- 
high University and an MCE from New 
York University. At present he is an 
attorney-engineer, vice president of 
Engineering Corporation of Baltimore. 
He previously was sales engineer for 
Dorr-Oliver, Inc. He was a corporal in 
the Armed Services from 1943 to 1945. 
He is a Diplomate. American Academy 
of Sanitary Engineers. He also belongs 
to a number of engineering associations, 
among them the American Society of 
Civil Engineers. He has had several 
articles published. 

Reinhard J. Buss. C.S.C.S. '59, of 
Decorah, Iowa, has joined the faculty at 
Luther College as an instructor in Ger- 
man. He also holds an M.A. from the 
University of California in Los Angeles. 
He served as translator-interpreter in 
the U. S. Army in Europe, and has been 
a graduate assistant in the Department 
of German at the University of Cali- 
fornia. 

Lt. Col. Wm. L. Bost, M.A. '59, is 
living in Atlanta, Georgia. He is a 
career officer in the regular Army and 
is at present Chief of Medical Plans 
Operations, 3rd U. S. Army. He has 
served in 15 foreign countries, including 
England, France, Germany, Belgium, 
Korea and Japan. His fraternity is Phi 
Alpha Theta, and he is a Scottish Rite 
32nd degree Mason. 

Thomas Harold Varley, Engr. '59, 
of Rochester, New York, is a project 
engineer of the Cas-Hoyt Corporation. 
He was previously manufacturing engi- 
neer and equipment engineer for Car- 
rier Corporation at Syracuse, New 
York. He served from 1950-1952 as a 
S/Sgt. in the armed forces. He is a 
member of ASME. His fraternities are 
Pi Tau Sigma and Tau Beta Pi. He 
also belongs to the Rochester Industrial 
Management Council. 

Si Duk Lee, M.S. '59, ph.d. '62, re- 
sides in Durham, North Carolina, and is 
a biochemist and Postdoctoral Fellow 
(NIH). He is a full member of Sigma 
Xi. He has had several papers pub- 
lished. 

THE SIXTIES 

Wayne H. Bethards, BPA '60, of 
Hyattsville, Maryland is a marketing 
assistant at Rixon Electronics, Inc. in 
Silver Spring, Maryland. He is a PFC, 
having served six months with the 
Armed Forces. He is a member of 
Phi Sigma Kappa, Alumni Association 
of the University of Maryland. He 
also belongs to the Loyal Order of 
the Moose, the B.P.O.E. Elks, and 
the Jaycees. 

Dorothy C. Brewer, Nurs. '60, re- 
sides in Baltimore. She is a staff nurse 
at the Psychiatric Institute of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. She is a member 
of Gamma Phi Beta. She also belongs 
to the Nurses' Alumni Association and 
the American Nurses' Association. 



Raymond W. Goodman, Jr., Engr. 
'60, is a resident of Silver Spring, Mary- 
land. He is an electrical engineer at 
Vitro Laboratories, and is a member of 
the Institute of Radio Engineers. 

Donald F. Herndon, LL.B. '60 lives 
in Silver Spring. Maryland and is with 
the safety regulations division of the 
Federal Aviation Agency. He pre- 
viously was employed at Martin Com- 
pany as an aero-engineer. He served 
with the Armed Forces from 1943- 
1946 and from 1950-1953, and attained 
the rank of Captain in the U. S. Army. 
He also holds a B.S. Mechanical Engi- 
neer degree, which he received from 
GWU in 1950. 

John F. Thompson, Agr. '60, is a 
resident of Mechanicsville, Maryland. 
He is at present enrolled in Graduate 
School, and is employed as a Voca- 
tional Agricultural Teacher at Margaret 
Brent High School. He has been the 
secretary of St. Mary's County Teach- 
er's Association, and secretary to the 
Mechanicsville Lions Club. He has 
had several papers published in the 
Maryland Vocational Agriculture News. 

Beverly R. Friedland, Edu. '61, 
lives in Silver Spring, Maryland, and is 
a teacher at High Point High School. 
Previously she was an assistant instruc- 
tor at the Maryland University College 
of Business & Public Administration 
from '61 -'62. She holds memberships 
in the National Education Association, 
United Business Education Associa- 
tion, Maryland Business Teacher's As- 
sociation, Maryland State Teachers 
Association and the Prince Georges 
County Teachers Association. 

Arnold Creste Mascolo, U.C. '61, 
resides in W. Long Branch, New Jersey. 
He is a field engineer, with PHILCO 
Corporation, working as a project 
officer in the doctrine and training liter- 
ature office of the Signal School, at 
Fort Monmouth, New Jersey. He served 
in the Armed Services for 20 years, 
having retired as a Major in December 
of 1960. He is a vice president of 
the local PTA and member of the 
Monmouth County Civil War Round 
Table. 

Carole E. Nortrup, H. Ec. '61, of 
New York City, New York, is a 
Therapeutic Dietitian at The New 
York Hospital. She is a member of 
Omicron Nu, and also belongs to the 
American Dietetic Association. 

Kristen L. Struebing, A&S '61, is 
residing in Sausalito, California. She 
is a teller at the Savings & Loan Co. 
Formerly, she was recreation worker 
and program director for the American 
National Red Cross, attached to the 
U.S. Army in Korea. She was record- 
ing secretary for Delta Delta Delta, 
and also belonged to Phi Kappa Phi, 
Alpha Lamda Delta and Tau Beta 
Sigma. She was a member actress of 
Pan Players-Childrens Theater, and San 
Francisco Adult Theater. 



Directory of Advertisers 



Acme Iron Works 28 

Alcazar 26 

American Disinfectant Co 26 

Anchor Post Products Co., Inc 27 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co., Inc 30 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn. ... 24 

Bard Avon School 26 

Bergmann's Laundry 29 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., Inc 30 

Bon Ton Food Products 26 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc 31 

D. Harry Chambers, Opticians 26 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 31 

Del Haven White House Motel 28 

Embassy Dairy 29 

Farmers Cooperative Assn 30 

J. H. Filbert 28 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn 28 

Fuller & d'Albert, Inc 29 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co 24 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 26 

Harvey Dairy 26 

Hotel Harrington 30 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc 24 

King Bros., Inc 26 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 28 

Lustine Chevrolet 25 

Maria's Restaurant 31 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 29 

Modern Machinists Co 26 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc 27 

North Washington Press, Inc 26 

Norman Motor Company, Inc 25 

Oles Envelope Corp 25 

Park Transfer Co 25 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 28 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co., Inc 27 

Seidenspinner Realtor 31 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 24 

Mrs. Smith's Colonial Baking Co 27 

Strayer College 24 

Student's Supply Store 30 

Sweetheart Bread 30 

Thomsson Steel Co.. Inc 29 

Wallop & Son, Insurance 25 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange Inc. . 31 

Westinghouse Electric Corp 2i 

Perry O. Wilkinson 26 

Williams Construction Company, Inc 27 

J. McKenny Willis &• Sons. Inc 25 

Windjammer Cruises 30 

York Wholesalers. Inc 31 

Duke Zeibert's Restaurant 24 



32 



the Maryland Magazine 



SPRING REUNIONS 

May 16 

Mark your calendar now to join 
your classmates at College Park 

Further information will be published in the next issue of the Maryland Magazine and in the Alumni 
Newsletter. Class officers interested in forming class reunion groups should contact with the alumni 

office at College Park. 



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How to make 




work like 





Our Red Cross does it, not with mirrors 
but with volunteers — volunteers who do- 
nate hundreds of millions of dollars' worth 
of free time and services. Total expendi- 
tures for 1962-63 by the Red Cross were 
$99,154,343. Here's how your Red Cross 
dollars were spent: Services to the Armed 
Forces, Veterans and their Families 38.7%, 
Disaster Services 9.3%, Blood Services 
14.1%, Nursing and Safety Services 8.6%, 
Youth Activities 4.0%, Services and Assist- 
ance to Chapters 5.1%, Other Community 
Services 0.7%, International Services 0.3%, 
Public Information 2.8%, Membership En- 
rollment and Fund Raising 3.1%, General 
Management-Planning and Administra- 
tion 13.3%. 



Like any business, the Red Cross has to 
budget its expenditures in advance. Each 
year the budget is examined in depth by 
business, labor and professional leaders 
who are members of the organization's 
national Board of Governors. Also, as re- 
quired by law, Red Cross expenditures are 
audited annually by the Department of 
Defense and a firm of independent public 
accountants. The audit report is sent to 
Congress by the Secretary of Defense. 

So, you can depend 
on the Red Cross to 
make your dollars 
work hard. And the 
Red Cross depends 
on you. 



Always there . . . with your help 







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